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Publication numberUS1705042 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 12, 1929
Filing dateDec 13, 1926
Priority dateDec 13, 1926
Publication numberUS 1705042 A, US 1705042A, US-A-1705042, US1705042 A, US1705042A
InventorsAbraham Babitch
Original AssigneeAc Spark Plug Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gasoline filter
US 1705042 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March l2, 1929; v A BABn-CH 1,705,042v

GAsoLINE FILTER Filed Deo. 13, 1926 mento/a Patented Mer. 12,1929.

11,705,042 PATENTOFFICE.

ABRAHAM BABITCII, or PLINT, MICHIGAN, AssIGNoR 'ro A C sPABLx PLUG CoMPANY, f ,i or PLINT, MICHIGAN, A COMPANY or MICHIGAN. i .f Y p' e GASOLINE FILTER.

Application led December 13, .1928. lSerial No. 154,506.

This invention relates to strainers or filters particularly to that type of strainer employed with gasoline supply systems for internal vcombustion engines.

The invention is especially ada\table for use with that type of strainer em odying a dirt receptacle or settling chamber for sand or other foreign matter, often found in commercial gasoline or other combustible fluid, and which must be taken apart at regular intervals, for cleaning or removal of accumulated sediment.

One of the primary objects of.' the invention is to provide a device which will be efficient in use, economical to manufacture, of few parts and which may be easily and quickly disassembled for cleaning and reassembled with a minimum of effort.

Other incidental objects will-appear from the following specification and accompanying drawing, wherein Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view thru a gasoline strainer embodying the present invention. igure 2 1s an elevation of the strainer looking toward the left in Figure 1. Figure 3 is a bottom plan view of the screen or filter element. Figure 4 is a vertical sectional view of a slightly modified form of strainer used with a vacuum fuel supply system.

Referring to the drawing, the reference character 1 indicates a dirt receptacle or sediment chamber, preferably of glass or other transparent material, to enable visual ascertaimnent of dirt accumulation. The open end or top of the receptacle 1 is closed by a cap or head 2, containing the inlet and outlet passageways for the lreceptacle. An annular downturned fiange 3 overhangs the top of the receptacle or bowl 1 and a gasket or packing ring 4 may be provided to seal the Joint between the head and receptacle. Clamped between the head and top of the receptacle is the peripheral marginal edge of a filter or strainer element 5, of fine wire mesh screen-or cloth, which'm'arginal edge is providedwith a metal ring or ferrule 6, having a number of integral downwardly extended spring fingers 7 exerting an outward pressure to frictionally engage the side of the receptacle.y A central opening in the screen 5 is also'bounded with a metal band or ferrule 8, and thru this opening extends a dependent hollow stem or stud 9, which is slightly tapered downwardly,

and has a shoulder or enlargement 10, to bear against the band 8 at the marginal edge of the central screen opening. This shoulder 10 1s located below the'top of the rece tacle and peripheral edge of the screen, an consequently`,'the screen is slightly distorted and assumes a conical shape. The resistance of the screen to such distortion and its natural tendency to return to normal shape, places the screen under tension and the abutment of the shoulder 10 and band 8 is renderedv leakproof. The conduit or ,pipe 11, from a fuel supply tank, communicates with a passageway 12 in the top of the head 2, leading to the hollow stem 9, thru a valve chamber 13. To control the liquid flow, a valve stem 14, having screw threaded engagement in a central opening in the fitting 15,'screw threaded into the fitting. 15, in turn threaded into the mouth of the valve chamber 13, carries two enlargements or valve heads 14a and 14". Figure 1 illustrates the adjustment of the stem 14 to closed position, when the enlargement or valve head 14b seats against a shoulder formed by a communicating opening between the valve chamber 13 and the dependent hollow stem 9. In open position, the stem is turned back until the enlargement 14a contacts the end of the double fitting, thereby serving to seal the fitting against leakage, W-hile the strainer is in use. The open bottom ofA thehollow stem is plugged by the disc 9a, and the liquid enters the receptacle thru lateral ports 16, whereby the force of the stream is defiected and no agitation or disturbance of sediment lying on the bottom of the receptacle occurs.. Liquid admitted by the inlet flows upward thru the screen, the dirt being precipitated to the bottom of the receptacle, and leaves thru the .port 17 into the passageway 18 and conduit 19, leading to the engine carburetor.

It will be apparent that the construction permits the straining and continued collection of sediment, even though the receptacle is almost completly filled, and .that thev actiony andefficiency ofthe strainer isuniform thruout, untilsubstant-ially'the maximum capac-l ity of the receptacleis'accumulated.

Pivoted in the head 2'isthe swinging bail 20, which passesthru'jan eye 21 of a screw threaded stud22, theeyebeingfirmly held by a staking ory upsetting operationen aflat-` tened portion of the bail to maintain the stud' in an upright position. A knurled nut 23 has threaded -engagement on the stud, to move the cup shaped stamping 24 into and ment.

out of engagement with the bottom of the receptacle 1.

To remove the dirt receptacle, the nut 23 is screwed down, allowing the stamping to fall Y and the bail may be swung to one side. Upon disengaging the receptacle from the head, the spring fingers 7 carry the screen along with the receptacle, and the screen may be lifted with the fingers for access to the dirt. After removal of the dirt, the screen is again placed over the top of the receptacle and the spring fingers serve to properly position the screen on the top of the receptacle for the attach- The stem 9 being tapered, there will be no tendency for the inside marginal edge of the screen to cling or stick to the stem, offering no difhculty to the engagement and disengagement of the parts.

In Figure 4 is illustrated a strainer of the same general type applied to a vacuum fuel supply system. In this instance the supply 'conduit ll is connected directly to the inlet stem 9, and the outlet passageway 18 leads to the receiving end of the vacuum tank 25. The passageway 18 extends thru the arm 26, having a terminal eye 27, thru which projects the fastening stud or bolt 28, having a passageway leading to the interior of the vacuum tank. The construction and operation is otherwise as before described.

While the invention has been described more or less specifically, it is to be understood that such obvious modifications may be made as come within the scope of 'the appended claims.

Having described the invention, I claim:

1. In a strainer, the combination of a dirtv receptacle, a cap detachably engageable therewith, having an inlet and an outlet communicating with the receptacle, and a screen separating the inlet and outlet, detachably connected with and removably carried by the receptacle, into and out of clamped engagement between the top of the receptacle and cap.

2. In a strainer, the combination of a dirt receptacle, a cap detachably engageable therewith, having an inlet and an outlet communicating with the receptacle, and a screen separating the inlet and outlet, with its peripheral marginal edge clamped between the receptacle and ca and having a detachable connection with tiie receptacle, consisting of a portion in rictional contact with the receptacle whereby the screen is carried with the receptacle into and out of engagement with the cap.

3. In a strainer, the combination of a dirt I receptacle, a cap detachably engageable therewith, having an inlet and an outlet communicating with the receptacle, and a screen separating the inlet and outlet, with its marginal ed e held between the receptacle and cap, an having dependent spring fingers frictionallyengaging the side of the receptacle whereby the screen is carried by the receptacle as a unit upon detachment ot' the receptacle from the cap.

4. In a strainer, the combination of a dirt receptacle, a cap detachably engageable therewith, having an inlet andan outlet communicating with the receptacle, a screen separating the inlet and outlet having its peripheral edges clamped between the top of the receptacle and the cap, a binder element for said peripheral edges having dependent integral spring fingers engageable with the walls of the receptacle to detachably secure the screen on the receptacle and a dependent hollow tapered stem on said cap, slidablethru an opening in the screen to ail'ord said inlet connnunication and having a shoulder located below the top ot' the receptacle, against which the inner marginal edge of the screen opening has tensioned contacting abutment.

5. In a strainer, the combination of a dirt receptacle, a cap detachably engageable therewith, having an inlet and an outlet communicating with the receptacle, a screen separating the inlet and outlet having its peripheral edges clamped between the top of the receptacle and the cap, a binder element for said peripheral edges having dependent integral spring fingers engageable with the walls of the receptacle to detachably secure the screen on the receptacle and a dependent hollow stem on said cap, slidable thru an opening in the screen to constitute said inlet communication, said stem having an exterior taper to facilitate its sliding engagement with said screen opening.

6. In a strainer, the combination of a dirt receptacle, a cap detachably engageable therewith, having an inlet and an outlet communicating with the receptacle, a screen separating the inlet and outlet, having its peripheral edges held between the top of the receptacle and said cap, means to detachably connect thescreen with the receptacle for removal from the cap as a unit, and a dependent hollow stem on said cap projecting thru and beyond said screen and having a lateral opening constituting said inlet, located adjacent the top of the receptacle.

7. In a strainer, the combination of a head having inlet and outlet openings, a screen interposed between said openings, a receptacle for matter strained by said screen, and means to detachably engage the receptacle with the head, including a swinging bail pivoted t0 said head, a screw threaded stud having a terminal eye through which the bail extends, an adjustable nut thereon, and a spacer moved into and out of engagement with the bottom of the receptacle upon adjustment of said nut.

8. The combination with two members to be detachably connected to each other, of a swin ing bail pivotally carried by one of the mem ers, a screw threaded stud having a terminal eye through which the bail extends, the material o which is upset about a flattened portion of the bail to form a rigid connection, a nut adjustably engageable with the stud and a spacer moved by the adjustment of said nut into and out of engagement with the other of said members.

9. A strainer screen, adapted to have its peripheral edges clamped between two members detachably connected with each other, characterized by dependent spring ingers carried by the screen for rictional engagement with one of said members, to detachably secure the screen thereto so as to becarried thereby when the members are detached one from another. l

l0. A strainer of the. class described, including a head having an inlet and an outlet therein, and a unit detachably secured thereto including a dirt receptacle with which said i-nlet and outlet communicate, and a screen element removably secured to the receptacle and adapted t be clamped between the receptacle and head and to separate the inlet and outlet.

11. A strainer of the class described, including a head having an inlet and an outlet therein, a dirt receptacle detachably connected to the head with which the inlet and outlet communicate, a strainer element adapted to be clamped between the receptacle and cap to separate said inlet and outlet, and

means to detachably connect the strainer element and receptacle for removal from the head as a unit.

In testimony whereof I aiix my signature.

ABRAHAM BABITCH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2511726 *Apr 22, 1947Jun 13, 1950Clark Metal Products IncDehydrator plug
US2633146 *Mar 21, 1947Mar 31, 1953Witt Joseph BFuel pulsation dampener and pressure regulator
US2646884 *Nov 10, 1948Jul 28, 1953Findley John ESediment bulb for carburetors
US2772001 *Nov 16, 1953Nov 27, 1956Gen Motors CorpFilter for fluids such as gasoline
US2943036 *May 13, 1957Jun 28, 1960Beckman Instruments IncOxygen analyzer
US2979208 *Dec 17, 1956Apr 11, 1961Wix CorpFluid line supported filter and filter mounting
US3055503 *Oct 29, 1958Sep 25, 1962EverpureWater purifying apparatus
US3105042 *Oct 18, 1960Sep 24, 1963Vernon D RoosaFilter assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/439, 210/440, 220/314, D23/209
International ClassificationB01D35/00
Cooperative ClassificationB01D35/005
European ClassificationB01D35/00B