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Publication numberUS1705497 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1929
Filing dateDec 22, 1921
Priority dateDec 22, 1921
Publication numberUS 1705497 A, US 1705497A, US-A-1705497, US1705497 A, US1705497A
InventorsFrederick C Overbury
Original AssigneeFlintkote Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roof
US 1705497 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

FEEDER/Ch C. OVEEBUEY ATTY-S.

F. C. OVERBURY ROOF Filed Dec. 22, 1921 March 19, 1929.

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M u n m Imam-m I W WW llllllllll Patented Mar. 19, 1929.

UNITED STATES PATENT 'OFFICE.

FREDERICK C. OVERBURY, F HILLSDALE, NEW JERSEY, QSSIGNOR TO THE FLINT- KOTE COMPANY, OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION OF MASSACHU- snr'rs.

ROOF.

Application filed December 22, 1921. Serial No. 524,104.

This invention relates to roofs, more particularly of that type composed of sheet material such as is commonly formed of fibrous material impregnated or coated with asphalt with or without a surface coating of ground slate or similar granular material to provide a weather-resisting surface of 'pleasingcolor. One of the ob ections here- .tofore urged against such roofing has been that even though the material is out in the shape of shingles or strips which may be laid in overlapping courses the comparative thinness of the material causes the roof to appear thin and cheap. v I

This invention provides a construction by which this objection is obviated and by which ifdesired a variegated effect may be produced in patterns simulating different forms of tiles or similar heavy, substantial and highly ornamental construction.

For a more complete understanding of this invention reference may be had to the accompanying drawings in which Figure 1 is a plan of a portion of sheet roofing which may be formed in accordance with this invention.

Figure 2 is a perspective" of the sheet partly formed into a completed panel.

Figure 3 is a planof a completed panel or roof section.

Figures 4 and 5 are views similar to 1 and 3 showing a different design.

Figure 6 is a perspective similar to Figure 2, but showing a modified construction.

Figure 7 is a View similar to Figure 6 showing a further modification. r g

Referring to the'form shown in Figures 1, 2, and 3, a strip of roofing material as 1 is formed with pairs of fold lines 2 and 3 I about which the material may be bent on itself in opposite directions. Extending upwardly from the fold line 2 the portion 4 which .forms' the outer surface of the completed panel is formed with cut-outs 5, these 0 cut-outs preferably terminating at the fold line 2 but may, if desired, be carried therearound or placed thereabove. The strip 1' is then folded in the manner shown in Figure 2, portions 4 forming the upper faces of overlapping courses, the portions 6 forming the lower faces ofthese courses. Between the folds may then be placed ieces of sheet material 7 to extend down' su stantially to the fold lines 2 so that the material thereof may showv through the cutouts and presenttherewith a pattern when the folds are brought closetogether in the manner shown in Figure 3. If desired the inserted sheets 7 may be of contrasting colors to the surface-of the folded sheet so as to produce a variegated color effect.

In-Figures 4 and ,5 is shown a similar construction of folded material but in which the cut-outs are of different shape to show a different pattern when the panel is formed as shown in Figure 5. WVhile the fold lines have been shown as extending laterally of the sheet, it is evident that they As a further-modification the lower edgeof the inserted strip may be cut out or notchedas shown at 71 in Figure 6 to show the surface of the underlying folded ortion the pattern. The p0rtion'71 may be such that the inner edge of the cut-out of the portion 40 is merely bordered by the color presented by the inserted sheet or an en-' tirely different pattern may be formed thereon as desired.

In Figure '7 is shown a construction wherein the inserted sheet is notched to to present an additional variegated orm to i form tabs 72 which project below the fold line 20- simulating'the lowerfends of rectangular tiles on shingles, this construction as shown being merely a modification of' that of Figure 6. A similar construction might, however, be applied to the panel construction illustrated in Figures 1 to 5. It will be seen that with the construction shown it is possible to obtain a great variety of patterns and color effects and that the thickness of exposed edges of the roofin units may be varied from one to three thicknesses of the sheet material of which i I they are composed so as to vary the extent of actual relative relief of the various portions.

7 Having thus described certain embodiments of this invention it should be evident that many changes and modifications might be made therein without departing from its spirit or scope as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A panel composed of a sheet folded alternately in opposite directions, the outwardly facing portions having designs'cut outtherefro'in, and a sheet'placed between the folds and showing through said cut-outs.

2. A panel composed of a sheet folded alternately in opposite directions, the outwardly facing portions having designs cut.

out therefrom, and sheets placed between the folds and showing through said cut-outs,

.' said folded and other sheets being of different colors. I

3. A panel composed of a sheet folded alternately in opposite directions, the outsaid last mentioned sheets having cut-outs through which the surface of the underly-.

wardly facing portions having designs cut out therefrom, and= sheets placed between the folds and showing through saidcut-outs,

ing folded portion is visible.

4;. A panel composed of a sheet folded alternately in opposite directions, each outwardly facing portion having cut-outs extending from the line offold with its adjacent underlying portion, and sheets notched at their edges plac d between the folds, the notched edges appearing-through said cut-outs.

' 5. A roofcomprising a series of overlying and a piece of sheet material of different color than said folded material inserted between the folds a portion of said piece being visible.

7. A roof composed of a series of overlying courses,.each course com rising a portion of sheet material folded ack on itself, and a piece of sheet material inserted between the folds, the outwardly facing parts of said folded material having cut-outs extending from the line of fold.

8. A roof composed of a series of overlying courses, each course comprising a portion of sheet'material folded back on itself,

and a piece of sheet material of different color than said folded material inserted be-v tween the folds, the outwardly facing parts of said folded material having cut-outs through which the inserted sheet is visible. 9. Aroof composed of a series'ofoverlymg courses, each course'comprlslng a 'p ortion of material folded back on -i tself, and a piece of sheet material inserted between the folds, the outwardly facing parts of said folded material" having cut-outs through 'which the inserted sheet is visible, said inserted material being out along its lower edge to form a pattern with said cut-outs.

10. A roof composedof a series of overlying courses, each' course comprising a portion of sheet material folded back on itself, and a .piece of sheet material of different color than said folded material inserted be-' tween the folds, the outwardly facing parts of said folded material having cut-outs through which the inserted sheet is visible, said inserted material being out along its lower edge to form a pattern with said cutouts. a

11. A roofing element comprising a piece I of sheet material folded on itself and having cut-outs in its outer layer, and apiece of sheet material inserted within the -fold and visible through said cut-outs.

12. A roofing element having exposed areas of different colors arranged according to a predetermined pattern, said element also having exposed edges presenting portions of three different thicknesses.

In testimony whereof I have aflixed my signature.

FREDERICK o. OVERBURY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5611186 *Nov 30, 1994Mar 18, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5666776 *Aug 30, 1995Sep 16, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US6038827 *Dec 2, 1998Mar 21, 2000Building Materials Corporation Of AmericaTrilaminate roofing shingle
US6220329Mar 17, 1998Apr 24, 2001Tamko Roofin ProductsApparatus for making laminated roofing shingles
US6544374Dec 18, 2000Apr 8, 2003Tamko Roofing ProductsMethod for making laminated roofing shingles
US6933037Sep 18, 1997Aug 23, 2005Tamko Roofing ProductsTriple laminate roofing shingle
US9212487Sep 28, 2005Dec 15, 2015Elk Premium Building Products, Inc.Enhanced single layer roofing material
US20070068108 *Sep 28, 2005Mar 29, 2007Elkcorp.Enhanced single layer roofing material
USD369421Mar 17, 1995Apr 30, 1996Elk Corporation Of DallasRandom cut laminated shingle
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/557
International ClassificationE04D5/00, E04D1/00, E04D5/02, E04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D2001/005, E04D5/02
European ClassificationE04D5/02, E04D1/26