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Publication numberUS1706704 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1929
Filing dateApr 1, 1927
Priority dateApr 1, 1927
Publication numberUS 1706704 A, US 1706704A, US-A-1706704, US1706704 A, US1706704A
InventorsRoss M G Phillips
Original AssigneeHarry V Whipple
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Safety system for burning fuel oil under pressure
US 1706704 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. M. G. PHlLLlPs Zffiamh 26, 1929.

SAFETY SYSTEM FOR BURNING FUEL OIL UNDER PRESSURE Filed April 1, 1927 5 Sheets-Sheet R555 MG. F'Hmupa March 26, 1929. R.- M. G. PHILLIPS 0 SAFETY SYSTEM FOR BURNING FUEL OIL UNDER PRESSURE Filed Aprill, 19 27 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTy.

March 9 v R. M. cs. PHILLIPS 1,706,704

SAFETY SYSTEM FOR BURNING FUEL OIL UNDER PRESSURE Filed April 1,1927 5S heets-Sheet 5 WR R5355 M; G. PHILLIPS By o " ATTy March 26, 1929. R. M. G. PHILLIPS SAFETY SYSTEM FOR BURNING FUEL OIL UNDER PRESSURE Filed April 1, 1927' 5 Sheets-Shae? 4 INVEpfiETQ M. G. PHILLIPS R055 By March 26, 1329., R. M. G. PHILLIPS SAFETY SYSTEM FOR BURNING FUEL OIL UNDER PRESSURE Filed April 1927 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVE FUR R EE M [3. PHILLIPS By AT Ty Patented Mar. 26, 1929.

UNITED sTATEsrA'rENr ROSS M. G. PHILLIPS, OF NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TU HARRY V.

WHIPPLE, OF NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT.

SAFETY SYSTEM FOR BURNING FUEL OIL UNDER PRESSURE.

Application filed April 1,

This invention relates to improvements in safety systems for burning fuel oil under pressure, and an object of the invention is to provide a safe means whereby the burning of fuel oil under pressure may be substituted for the burning of coal or other fuel in connection with the use of furnaces and the like. In carrying out this general object, further specific objects are to provide in connection with the fuel oil source of supply and the conduit therefrom to the burner a safety release mechanism whereby upon any irregularity in the pressure flow of the fuel oil in the conduit, such as excessive pressure, over-supply, or escape of fuel oil, said flow will be automatically diverted and returned to the source of supply; to provide a fuel oil conduit extending from the source of supply to the burner and adapted in the event of leakage anywhere therein, to care for the safe storage of the escaping fuel oil and by means of the storage thereof, to automatically operate a safe-- ty release adapted to divert and return the fuel oil from the conduit to the source of supply; to provide a gravity tripping mechanism that shall include a movable container which will receive the escaping fuel'oil from the pump and the supply conduit, the predeterinined weight of such fuel oil being adapted to operate through tripping mechanism a safety release to divert and return the fuel oil from the supply conduit to the source of supply; to provide, in the event of 5 excessive pumping of fuel oil into the air pressure tank forming a part of the supply conduit, means by which a diaphragm provided by a safety pressure cylinder connected with the pressure tank may operate 40 the gravity tripping mechanism independently of the weight of stored fuel oil within the movable container; to provide a float tripping mechanism, including a fixed container and a float therein, adapted to be raised by the storage of fue1-oil escaping from the supply conduit, the pressure oil burner, or the fuel oil supply valves to the enerator and the burner, and received by the container, the raising of the float being adapted to operate by means of the tripping chanism, the safety release to divert and eturn the fuel oil from the supply conduit and connected parts to the source of supply; to provide a pressure fuel oil burner adapted to be readily disassembled for easy installa- 1927. Serial No. 186,272.

tion through the door of and within the ash pit of a furnace of ordinary construction; to provide a generator in connection with the pressure fuel oil burner, having arbon catchers therein; and to provide electrical means whereby when the pressure flow of fuel oil is automatically diverted and returned from the supplynconduit anti connected parts to the source or arpply through the happening" of any of the contingencies 5 provided frag-an alarm will he sounded to indicate that the burner is no longer lighted, WVith these and other objects in View, as will more fully hereinafter appear, the invention consists in certain features of novel 7o construct-ion and arrangement of parts hereinafter described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings and particularly pointed out wherein patentable novelty is claimed, it being understood that within the scope of what hereinafter thus is claimed various changes in form, proportion, size, and minor details of the construction, can be made without departing from the spirit or modifying any of the advantages of the invenso tion.

The following is the description of an embodiment of the invention, reference being had to the accompanying drawings in which- Figure l is an elevation of the associated elements embraced in the system;

Figure 2' is an elevation of the safety re lease mechanism;

Figure 3 is an elevation of the gravity w tripping mechanism;

l igure 3 is a perspective view of "'l slide switch, the parts in section being t generally upon lines 33 of Figure 3;

Figure 4 is an elevation of the float trip--- ping mechanism;

Figure 5 is an elevation of the pressure fuel oil burner including the generator;

Figure 6 is an end elevation of the and generator;

' Figure 7 is an elevation on an enlarged scale of the generator, partly in section;

Figure 8 is a cross sectional elevation a portion of the generator, taken upon 8-8 of Figure '3;

Figure 9 is a similar view taken generally upon line 99 of Figure 7; and

Figure 1.0 is a fragnientary view of a section of the fuel oil supply conduit.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, in which similar parts are similarly numbered, the invention provides a pressure fuel oil burning system, which in addition to the certain well known employment of safety 'l'uses, the destruction of which by excessive heat. operates to discontinue the sup ply of :l'uel oil to the burner introduces novel means whereby oil supplied to the burner under pressure may be used as a fuel without the previously attending hazards due to the leakage in the supply conduit and con nected parts, excessive pressure, overtlow and other reasons. The system embraces a source ot" supply which is illustrated as a ;-npply tank 1, a pump 2, a safety release mechanism 3. a pressure tank 4, a pressurestat 5. a gauge (3, a gravity tripping mechanism 7, a tloat tripping mechanism 8, a tinnacc t), a pressure fuel oil burner 10, a generator 11, and pipe connections including that section of the supply conduit 12 which is enclosed within a larger conduit 13 providing a chamber 14 between the. inner and outer conduits, which chamber it leads to both ot the tripping mechanisms 7 and 8 hereinafter more fully described. Figure 1 illustrates generally the. relation of some of these elements. The tripping mechanisms 7 aml 8 form important parts of the system and while on illustrated as operated by a gravity weight and the other by a buoyant float, it is not intended that either shall. be confined to its illustrated mode of operation as a distinguishing feature. The tripping mechanism 7 is placed near the pressure tank 4 and the pump 2 as a matter of conveniem-e; tor the outlet 15 of the pipe 31 for the fuel oil escaping from the pump 2, as well as one end of the chamber l t surrounding the supply conduit 12, a section of which is illustrated in Figure 10, terminates at and etl'ects this mechanism as does also a diaphragm 75 of safety pressure cylinder ll provided by the pressure tank 4. In Figure 2 the safety release mechanism 3 comprises a one-way valve 16 located at the junction of the pipe 17 connected at one end to the sup ply tank 1 and the supply conduit 18 leading from the pump 2. Normally this valve 16- is closed so that the impulses ot' the pump 2 force the flow of fuel oil past the closed valve 16 and along on its course to the pressure tank 4. Connected to the gate 19 of the valve 16 is a rod 20 which against the tension of coiled spring 21 may be made to maintain the gate 19 in closed position. The toggle mechanism comprises links 22 and 23 pivotally connected by pivot 24. The upper end of the link 22 is pivotally connected with the fixed collar 77 by pivot 25 while the link 23 is pivotally connected by the pivot 26 to an adjustable plug 78 connected with the valve 16. The arm 27 connected with I i the link 23 extends at an angle therefrom.

When the arm 27 is operated to the position of the dotted line in the same figure the link 23 thereby swung upon its pivot 26, its other end carrying with it the lower end of the link 22 to which the link 23 is pivoted by the pivot 2-l. As the links 22 and 2.; can take these. positions only by shortening the distance between the pivots 2t and 27 the toggle action moves the rod 2t) with the aid of the spring 21 to move the gate it) to its open position. \Vith the valve lti thus opened the impulses ot the pump 2. it continued, will force the fuel oil along the course of the least resistance through the open valve it; and by way of pipe 17, back to the supply tank l; for the l'uel oil in the pressure tank t and its connections leading to the burner 10 having been under pressure while the valve 16 was closed, reacts now that the valve lti is open and such reaction releasing the pressure, causes the return of the fuel oil therein to the supply tank 1 as the source of supply. l n Figure I} the gravity mechanism 7 comprises an arm 2h extending from the toggle 29 of similar construction to that ol the sat'ety release toggle. above described. but mounted in reverse position and adapted for the two extreme po sitions illustrated by t'uil and dotted lines. Suspended from the. arm 25 by the rod Ill is a container 30, the weight of which alone is insutlicient to operate the arm 26 to such dotted position, when, however, a predetermined quantity of escaped fuel oil is stored therein and thus reclaimed through the medium ot' the pipe 231, leading from the pump overflow basin 32 and pipe 3 leading from the chamber ll surrounding the supply conduit 12, the additional weight thcreot gravitates the container 30 and moves such arm to its dotted position. This action op rates the sa'l'ety release mechanism through the medium of the rod 35 to divert and return the fuel oil from the pressure supply tank l and its connections to the supply tank 1, as above dcseribed. As the arm 2h rocks to th dotted position it actuates a sliding member through the link 36 and operates an electric switch 38 to discontinue the motor, by means of which the pump 2 is operated. The electric connections for this switch are illustrated in Figure l. .ltlxtending from this link 36 is a contact arm 39 adapted upon the movement of member 256 to which it is fixed to make an electrical connection with a switch member 40 to operate the alarm 41. The alarm mechanism is illustrated to include a hell but it may be a buzzer or any other approved form of alarm'devme. dependently from this gravity o inn th arm 28 having an offset portiongtig dj t to the toggle mechanism is adapted to be moved by a lever 43 mounted on the saf r pressure cylinder 41-4 connected with the pr sure tank 4 by the pipe 74: for the engage. ment with the offset portion 42 when the lever 43 is moved through the action of the diaphragm 75, illustrated as forming the bottom of the cylinder 44. The normal action of the diaphragm is inwardly so that theahnormal compression of oil within the cylinder 44 will move the diaphragm outwardly when excessive pumping has delivered to the pressure tank 4 a greater pressure of fuel oil than the pressurestat is set for. The toggle mechanism 2t) is provided with the spring 45 to aid the tripping movement and the lever 43 is provided with the. adjustment spring 46 to help return such lever to its normal position. The screw 80 provides a convenient means for varying the relative timing of action of the arm 28.

in Figure 4 the float tripping mechanism 8 comprises the arm 47 associated with the tog-- gle mechanism 48, the construction of which is similar to that of the mechanism 29.

The extreme positions of the arm 47 are illustrated by full and dotted lines. Suspended from the arm 47 by the rod 49 is a float 50 normally resting on the bottom of a fixed container 51. This container receives the escaped fuel oil which passes through the pipe 52 from the drip basin 53, thus reclaiming the escaped fuel oil from the chamber 14, the valves 55 and 5G, and also through the pipe 54 leading from the burner 10 to reclaim a surplus supply. The accumulation of this fuel oil causes the float 50 to rise and when a predetermined quantity has been thus accumulated the float 50 will have risen suiiiciently to lift through the medium of the rod 49, the arm 47, the toggle mechanism 48, and the rod 57, rocking the lever 58 mounted on the box 59 containing the float tripping mechanism. :13 the lever 58 is moved to its dotted position (see Figure 4) the cord (31 mounted on the pulleys 62 is slightly released to permit the gravity movement of the weight 63 which contacts a hall 64 or the like carried by the cord 61, with the arm 27 of the safety release mechanism 3 and thereby operates the valve 16 to divert and return the fuel oil from within the supplyconduit and its connections to thesupply tank 1. Connected with the valves 55 and 56 are the fuel oil supply pipes 65 and 66, respectively, leading to the electric generator (not shown) associated with the generator and the pressure fuel oil burner 10 The pressure fuel oil burner 10 is construct ed for quick disassembly and assembly of the manifold for the convenience in passing the parts through the ash pit door of the furnace of ordinary construction to be readily set up Within the ash pit and connected for use. For this purpose the pressure burner manifold 76 is adapted to slip over the tubing end 67. The generator 11 is provided with carbon catching disks 68 mounted on rods 69 extending through them, the disks being spaced apart by bushings 7 0 and tank 4 under air pressure through the sup ply conduit 12 to the valves and 5h. inc valve 55 is now opened and a supply of fuel. oil passes through pipe to the electric generator (not shown) of ordinary type and from thence through pipe 120 and is delivered in a vapor spray 119 to the mixing chamber 72 in the auxiliary hurne'. lift.

This is now lighted manually and permitted to burn until the generator 11 is heated. The valve 58 is now opened and t l oil passes through pipe 66 to the generator This oil is vaporized by contact with ti heated generator 11., rises and travr c through conduit 112 to chamber 113 in standard 114, through the 115 into the mixing chamber 72 and to the burner 10 through the tube 67 and manifold 76. The valve 55 is closed after the valve 56 is opened. A needle valve 116 of any preferred construction determines the volume of vapor admitted to the mixing chamber 72,

In the operation of the multiple safety means which the system introduced by the invention affords, let us tirst suppose that through excessive heat either of the sa fuses 73 associated With the cord til is destroyed. he Weight (33 is thereby released drops and contacts the bail til carried by the cord 61 with the arm 27 thereby operating the safety release mechanism to open the valve and thcrethrough and through the pipe 17 to divert and return from the pump 2 am 2 ipply conduit 12 and its connections the fuel oil hack to the tank 1 and releasing all pressure in the pressure tank 4 and pipe connections to the burner 10 and putting out the the burner 10. Again let us suppose that through the escaped and reclaimed fuel oil from the pump 2 or from one end of the chamber 14- surrounding the conduit the gravity container Sill receives the predeten mined quantity of reclaimed fuel oil, container ill) will then drop and through i to medium of the rod 34 andithe arm 28 the log gle mechanism 29 will move the rod and hence the safety release mechanism 3 to open the valve 16 to divert and return from the pump 2 the supply conduit 12 and its connections the fuel oil back to the supply tank and releasing all pressure the press tank 4 and pipe connect-ionsito the burner 10 As the arm 28 is rocked with the of the container 30 the ending no 4'9- is moved, its movement operating the electric switch 38 to stop the motor attached to the pump 2. This movement of the member 36 electrically contacts the arm 39 carried thereby with the switch member 40 having wired-connection with the alarm device 41 to sound an alarm indicating that the burners 10 and 111 are no longer lighted, the supply of fuel oil having been discontinued through the opening of the valve 16. Should thepump 2 provide an excessive supply of fuel oil to the pressure tank 4 the diaphragm 75, provided by the cylinder 44 connected with the pressure tank 4, will be sprung outwardly by the excessive high pressure within the tank 4 and communicated to the cylinder 44. This action of the diaphragm moves the lever 43 into engagement with the offset portion 42 of the arm 28 to trip the gravity tripping mechanism 7 independently of the means of operation provided by the gravity movement of the container 30. The pressurestat 5 ordinarily controls the pressure within the tank 4 by automatically stopping and starting the motor attached to the pump 2 when the pressure reaches the normal high and low points. Let us further suppose that none of the contingencies arise for which provision is made by the safety fuses 73 or by the different ways of tripping the gravity tripping mechanisi'ii 7, but that the fixed con tai'ner 51 receives the predetermined quantity oi}, reclaimed fuel oil from the drip basin 53 tir-3.; the pipe 66 from the burner 10. The

' float will then rise and through the rod 49 the arm 47, the toggle mechanism 48, the rod 57, the lever 58, the cord 61, the weight 63, and the ball 64, the arm 27 of the safety release mechanism 3 is operated to open the valve 16 to divert and return from the pump 2 the supply conduit 12 and its connections, the fuel oil back to the supply tank 1 and releasing all pressure in the pressure tank 4 and the pipe connections to the burner 10. Thus every contingency requiring the care of escaping fuel oil through. excessive pressure, leakage, over-supply or overflow is provided for by this system in combination with the safety fuses providing for the contingency arising through excessive heat.

The tank 4 is entirely closed at the top, the bottom being riveted and brazed therein or secured by any other preferred means. Oil is admit-ted and' discharged from the tank near the bottom thereof. Thus, as the oil is pumped into the tank its level is above the top of the inlet and outlet pipes and when the amount pumped into the tank exceeds that drawn therefrom, the level of the top of the oil is raised. In such case the air between the top of the tank and the oil is compressed and exerts its pressure to force the oil from tank to the burner, where it is consumed. lVith this type of tank there can be no escape of air and the only possible leakage is of oil at the bottom of the tank, and is therefore visible. Heretofore in tanks of this type the oil was admitted at the top of the tank and thus it first passes through the air chamber; and again, the air gauge, pressurestats, etc., are usually connected directly with this tank at the top. Thus several openings are required at the top of the tank to accommodate fittings, for the purpose above indicated. All of these openings are possible sources of leakage of air from the tank whereby'the pressure of air therein is reduced or entirely destroyed. This leakage being of air is not readily discovered.

\Vhat I claim as new is 1. A safety release for a fuel oil burning under pressure system, said system embracing a supply tank, a burner, and connections, including a pump and a pressure tank, between the supply tank and the burner to conduct fuel oil under pressure to the burner, said release con'ip-rising a one-way valve provided by a pipe connected at one end to the supply tank and at the other end coupled to said connections intermediate the pump and the pressure tank, the gate of the valve being controlled by a spring-pressed rod secured to the gate and extending cxteriorly of the valve casing for a sliding movement through a rigid support provided by said pipe, the spring tension tending to maintain the gate in its open position; a tripping mechanism comprising a toggle pivotally connected to the rod and to the valve casing, and thus adapted when in alignment with the rod to maintain the rod in valve closed position against its spring tension, the toggle having a rigid arm extending at an angle therefrom and adapted for a rocking move ment to swing the toggle upon its valve pivot to collapse the toggle and to permit the spring-pressed rod to operate the valve ate to its open position, thus providing a s iort course of the least resistance for the pumpforced fuel oil back to the supply tank and at the same time providing a channel of escape for the fuel oil contained in the said connections under pressure; and automatic means for the operation of the arm, and hence the tripping mechanism, upon the hap pening of certain contingencies requiring care for the safe continuance of the heating system.

2. A gravity tripping mechanism for a safety fuel oil burning under pressure sys tem, said system embracing a supply tank, a safety release, a burner, and connections, including a pump and a pressure tank between the supply tank and the burner, said tripping mechanism having a toggle pivoted to an upper rigid supportprovided by the base plate upon which the mechanism is mounted and to a shoulder carried by a spring-pressed rod extendiig through both the upper support and a lower rigid support also provided by the base plate, the toggle while in alignment with the rod being adapted to maintain the rod ina position compressing its spring means; an arm associated rigidly with and extending at an angle from the toggle, the arm being adapted for a rocking movement upon the rigid support pivot to collapse the toggle, the collapse being aided by the release of the spring-pressed rod;

and a gravity container associated with the arm and adapted upon receiving a predetermined quantity of escaped fuel oil reclaimed and stored therein to rock the arm by gravity and thus collapse the toggle, the arm operating through the medium of a rod, the safety release to provide-by said release a channel of escape for the fuel oil under pressure from said connections. I

3. A gravity tripping mechanism for a safety fuel oil burning under pressure system, said system embracing a supply. tank,

, a safety release, a motor attached to a pump,

a source of electrical power to operate the motor, a burher, and connections, including a pump and a pressure tank, between the supply tank and the burner to conduct fuel oil under pressure to the burner, this tripping mechanism comprising a toggle pivoted to an upper rigid support provided by the base plateupon which the mechanism is mounted and to, a shoulder carried by a spring-pressed rod extending through both the upper support and a lower rigid support also provided by the base plate, the toggle while in alignment with the rod being adapted to maintain the rod in a position compressing its spring means; an arm rigidly associated with, and extending at an angle from the toggle the arm being adapted for a rocking movement upon the rigid support t pivot to collapse the toggle, the collapsebeing aided by the release of the spring-pressed rod a gravity container associated with the arm and adapted upon receiving a predetermined quantity of'escaped fuel oil reclaimed and stored therein to rock the arm by gravity and thus collapse the toggle, the

arm operating through the medium of the rod, the safety release to provide by said release a channel of escape for the fuel oil under pressure from said connections; and a sliding member associated with the base plate and connected with the arm and also with an electric switch controlling the motor, said member being adapted to disconnect and connect the source of electrical power from the motor as'the arm is rocked.

4. A gravity tripping mechanism for a safety fueloil burning under pressure system, said system embracing a supply tank, a safety release, a motor attached to a pump, an electric alarm device, a-(source of electrical power to operate the motor and the alarm device, a burner, and connections, including a pump and a pressure tank, be-

tween the supply tank and the burner to conduct fuel oil under pressure to the burner, this tripping mechanism having a toggle pivoted to an upper rigid support provided by the base plate upon which the mechanism is mounted and to a shoulder carried by a spring-pressed rod extending through both the upper support and a lower rigid sup port also provided by the base plate, the toggle while in alignment with the rod being adapted to maintain the rod in a position compressing its spring means; an arm rigidly associated with and extending at an angle from'the toggle, the arm being adapted for a rocking movement upon the rigid support pivot to collapse the toggle, the collapse being aided by the release of the spring-pressed rod; a gravity container associated with the arm and adapted upon receiving a predetermined quantity of escaped fuel .oil reclaimed and stored-therein, to rock the arm by gravity and thus collapse the toggle, the arm operating through a rod, the safety release to provide a channel of escape for the fuel oil under pressure from said connections; a sliding member associated with the base plate andconnected with the arm and with an electric switch controlling the motor, said member operating the switch as the arm is rocked; and a bifurcated contact member provided by the sliding member to contact upon the rocking of the arm, with a switch member associated with the base plate and electrically wired to the alarm device.

5. A gravity tripping mechanism for a safety fuel oil burning under pressure system, said system embracing a supply tank, a safety release, a burner, and connections, including a pump and a pressure tank be tween the supply tank and the burner to conduct fuel oil under pressure to the burn er, this tripping mechanism having a toggle pivoted to an upper rigid support provided by the base plate upon which the mechanism is mounted and to a shoulder carried by a spring-pressed rod extending through both the upper support and a lower rigid support also provided by the base plate, the toggle while in alignment with the rod being adapted to maintain the rod in a position compressing its spring means; an arm rigidly associated with and extending at an angle from the toggle for a rocking movement upon the rigid support pivot to collapse the toggle, the collapse being aided by the release of the spring-pressed rod, the arm being provided with an offset portion adjacent the toggle; and a diaphragm provided by an air cylinder connected with the pressure tank and normally sprung inwardly, being adapted to be sprung outwardly by excessive pressure within the pressure tank and to engage through the medium of a lever mounted on the cylinder, the offset portion to operate the arm and collapse the toggle, the arm opcrating through a rod the safety release to thereby provide a channel of escape for the fuel oil under pressure from said connecs tions.

6. A float tripping mechanism for a safety fuel oil burning under pressure system, said system embracing a supply tank, a safety release, a burner, and connections, including a pump and a pressure tank between the sup ply tank and the burner to conduct fuel oil under pressure to the burner, this tripping mechanism having a toggle pivoted to an upper rigid support provided by the base plate upon which the mechanism is mounted and to, a shoulder carried by a spring pressed rod extending through a lower rigid sup port also provided by the base plate and through the upper support to connect/with an overhead lever, the toggle while in alignment with the rod being adapted to maintain the rod in a position compressing its spring means; an arm rigidly associated with and extending at an angle from the toggle for a rocking movement upon the rigid support pivot to collapse the toggle, the collapse being aided by the release of the spring-pressed rod advancing to operate the overhead lever; a fixed container provided by the base plate; and a float member normally resting within the container and associated with the arm, the float being adapted as the container accumulates a predetermined quantity of escaped fuel oil reclaimed and stored therein, to gradually rise, rock the arm and thereby collapse the toggle, the released spring-pressed toggle rod aiding the collapse and lifting the overhead lever and permitting aweight, connected thereto by a cord, to drop and through a member carried by the cord to operate the safety release, thereby providing a channel of escape for the fuel oil under pressure from said connections.

v 7. A tripping mechanism comprising a base plate; a toggle pivoted to the plate and to a shoulder carried by a spring pressed rod associated with the plate, the rod while the toggle is in alignment therewith being maintained in a position compressing its spring means; an arm rigidly connected with and extending at an angle from the toggle and adapted for a rocking movement upon the toggle base pivot to collapse the toggle, such collapse being aided by the release of the spring-pressed rod; and a gravity member associated with the arm and adapted to move the arm to trip the toggle at predetermined times, the movement of the arm being communicated to auxiliary mechanism.

8. A tripping mechanism comprising a base-plate; a toggle pivoted to the plate and to a shoulder carried by a spring-pressed rod associated with the plate, the rod While the toggle is in alignment therewith being maintained in a position compressing its spring means; an arm rigidly connected with and extending at an angle from the toggle and. adapted for a rocking movement upon the toggle base pivot'to collapse the toggle, such collapse being aided by the release of the spring-pressed rod; a gravity member associated with the arm and adapted to move the arm to trip the toggle at predetermined times; and connectingmeans between one of the parts moved by said collapse and an auxiliary mechanism adapted to communicate motion thereto.

9. A tripping mechanism comprising a base'plate; a toggle pivoted to the plate and to a shoulder carried by a spring ressed ro'd associated with the plate, the re while the toggle is in alignment therewith being maintained in a position compressing its spring means; an arm rigidly connected with and extending at an angle from the toggle and adapted for a rocking movement upon the toggle base pivot to collapse the toggle, such collapse being aided by the release of the spring-pressed rod; and a diaphragm associated with a pressure tank and adapted to move the arm to trip the toggle at predetermined times, the movement of the arm being communicated to auxiliary mechanism.

10. A tripping mechanism comprising a base plate; a toggle pivoted to the plate and to a shoulder carried by a spring-pressed rod associated with the plate, the rod while the toggle is in alignment therewith being maintained in a position compressing its spring means; an arm rigidly connected with and extending at an angle from the toggle and adapted for a rocking movement upon the toggle base pivot to collapse the toggle, such collapse being aided by the release of the spring-pressed rod; a diaphragm associated with a pressure tank and adapted to move the arm to trip thetoggle at predetermined times; and a connecting means between one of the parts moved by said collapse and an auxiliary mechanism adapted to communicate motion thereto.

11. A tripping mechanism comprising a base plate; a toggle pivoted to the plate and to a shoulder carried by a spring-pressed rod associated with the plate, the rod while the toggle is in alignment therewith being maintained in a position compressing its spring means; an arm rigidly connected with and extending at an angle from the toggle and adapted for a rocking movement upon the toggle base pivot to collapse the toggle, such collapse being aided by therelease of the spring-pressed rod; and a float member associated with the arm and adapted to move the arm to trip the toggle when a container holding the float receives sufiicient fluid to raise the float, the movement of the rod being communicated to auxiliary mechanism. 1

12;. A. tripping; mechanism; comprisingv a base. plate a v toggle pivoted, to the plate: and.

to, a shoulder carried; by. a spring-pressed: rod associated with the; plate, the, rod' while; i the; toggle is in alignment therewith being maintained in -21. position compressing its s rin means-an armri idl connctedwith thespring-pressed rod; a float member associated. with the arm and adapted to move the arm totrip the toggle when a container holdingthe float, recelvessufiicient fluid to raise the float; and connecting means between one of the parts moved by said collapse and an auxiliary mechanism adapted to communicate motion thereto.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto aflixed my signature.

ROSS M. G. mum

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2660232 *Sep 20, 1949Nov 24, 1953Thompson Prod IncJet pump fluid flow system
US2870827 *Oct 4, 1954Jan 27, 1959Lucus T BrockbankAutomatic valve and switch for fuel burners
US2969799 *Dec 28, 1954Jan 31, 1961Phillips Petroleum CoPumping system
US5048552 *Jun 28, 1990Sep 17, 1991Bourne Douglas AUniversal trip valve operators and trip actuating seismic vibration sensors and transducers therefor
US5456595 *May 23, 1994Oct 10, 1995Henderson; Richard W.Device for preventing flareup in barometric-type wick-fed liquid fuel burners
US5551865 *Nov 17, 1995Sep 3, 1996Henderson; Richard W.Safety shut-off device for liquid fuel burners
US5662468 *Aug 14, 1995Sep 2, 1997Henderson; Richard W.Device that prevents flareup in liquid fuel burners
US5730115 *Jul 19, 1996Mar 24, 1998Henderson; Richard W.Device for preventing flareup in liquid fuel burners by regulating fuel flow into the fuel chamber
US5772425 *Jul 19, 1996Jun 30, 1998Henderson; Richard W.Device for preventing flareup in liquid fuel burners by containing sump vapors
US5899682 *Mar 31, 1997May 4, 1999Henderson; Richard W.Device for preventing flareup in liquid fuel burners by regulating fuel flow from the removable fuel tank
US5967765 *Aug 19, 1997Oct 19, 1999Henderson; Richard W.Device for preventing flareup in liquid-fuel burners by providing constant-rate fuel flow from removable fuel tank
US6254380May 30, 2000Jul 3, 2001Richard W. HendersonDevice for preventing flareup in barometric-type liquid fuel burners by preventing excessive temperature levels at removable fuel tank
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/73, 431/216, 137/558, 74/2, 251/72, 200/85.00R, 431/16, 431/208, 137/405
International ClassificationF23D11/46
Cooperative ClassificationF23D11/46, F23N2039/06
European ClassificationF23D11/46