Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1710543 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1929
Filing dateOct 27, 1925
Priority dateOct 27, 1925
Publication numberUS 1710543 A, US 1710543A, US-A-1710543, US1710543 A, US1710543A
InventorsLeo Stephen J
Original AssigneeLeo Stephen J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carton for holding vacuum tubes and the like
US 1710543 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 23, 1929. L 1,710,543

CARTON FOR HOLDING VACUUM TUBES AND THE LIKE Filed Oct. 27, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet l 125 f I i s-J Sic 072cm c1560,

INVENTOR ATTORNEY wmqzsszs WW v EY April 23, 1929. a J, L O 1,710,543

CARTON FOR HOLDING' VACUUM TUBES AND THE LIKE Filed Oct. 27, 1925 2 Shets-Sheet 2 By. a

INVENTOR PATENT OFFICE.

STEPHEN J. LEO, OI JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY.

CARTON r03. HOLDING VACUUM swims an inn: LIKE.

Application filed October 27, 1925. Serial No. 65,172.

This invention relates to cartons made from pasteboard or similar material, and adapted to be used commerciall for holding vacuum tubes, electric light ulbs or the like, so asto protect the same from injury while being handled.

The general object of the invention is to provide a container which may be sealed, so that it is impossible to remove the tube therefrom, or to substitute a used tube, without breaking the seal or some other part of the carton, so that if the seal is unbroken, the customer may be sure that he is getting a new tube. The carton is so constructed, however, that the tube may be tested without removin the same from the carton.

The speci 0 construction of the invention, and its advantages will be more fully explained in connection with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate one embodiment thereof.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective view showing the container before the tube is placed therein.

Figure 2 is a central vertical section showing the tube in the container, and the latter sealed.

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the same with the cover removed.

Figure 4 is 'a horizontal section on the line 4-4 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a perspective view of the container after the tube is sealed therein.

Figure 6 is a perspective view of the outer casing before it is applied to the container.

Figure 7 is a perspective view of the inner box portion.

Figure 8 is a perspective view of the neck portion of the container.

Figure 9 is a perspective view of the corrugated paper lining.

The invention in its present embodiment is adapted to receive a vacuum tube 10 having a base'll provided with terminals 12. 'The carton comprises an inner rectangular box portion 13, open at the bottom, and having a top 14 with a central circular opening 15 through which the base 11 may protrude. This inner box portion is adapted to fit within an outer rectangular casing 16, and is permanently secured thereto by wire stitches 17, or other suitable means. The casing 16 has a fiap 18 at its lower end, which is initially left open, as shown in Figure 3, so that the tube may be inserted.

A rectangular neck portion 19 is adapted to fit within the upper end of the inner box portion 13, and the bottom of this neck portion 1s provided with a central circular openlng 20, sllghtly lar er than the opening 15, and adapted to fit the fragile ortion of the tube 10. In packing the tu in the carton, the bulb is surrounded with a protcctlve covering 21 of corrugated paper, or the like, and the bottom of the carton is filled with suitable wadding 22.

After the tube has been packed within the carton the flap 18 is closed and sealed by a suitab e binder 23, and the tube can not then be removed from the carton without breaking the seal, or destroying some other part of the carton. The inner box portion 13 pro ects somewhat above the outer casing 16, as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3, and is adapted to receive a cover 24. The base 11 of the tube projects above the inner box portion 1.3,

but is sufficiently protected by the cover 24.

When the latter is removed, however, the base portion 11 may be inserted in a suitable socket for testing the same without removing the tube from the carton.

The upper end 14 of the inner box portion is preferably provided with diagonal perforated lines 25, which may be easily broken when it is desired to remove the tube from the carton for use. As long as the lines 25 and the seal 23 remain intact, however, the purchaser may be assured that he is getting a new tube. The top 14 may, if desired, be inscribed with the notation that if the perforations are broken the guaranty. is also broken.

While I have shown and described one specific form in which the invention may be embodied, it is apparent that various modifications may be made in the size, sha e and proportion of the various parts thereo without any material departure from the essential features of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed is:

1. A carton for holding a vacuum tube or the like, comprising an outer casing, an inner box portion secured to the outer casing and projecting above the same and having a continuous integral top with an opening adapted to fit the base of the tube but not large enough to permit passage of the larger portion thereof, means for closing and sealing the lower end of said casing after the tube has been placed within the inner box portion with its base projecting through said opening, so that the tube cannot be removed from the carton without breaking the seal or some other partof the carton, and a removable cover adapted to fit over the projecting portion of the inner box to protect the base of the tube.

2. A carton for holding a vacuum tube or the like, comprising an outer casing, an inner box portion secured to the outer casing and having a continuous integral top with an opening adapted to fit the base of the tube, a flap adapted to close the lower end of the inner box portion, and means for sealing the lower end of the casing to retain the flap after the tube'has been placed within the inner box portion with its base projecting through said opening, said top having rows of perforations extending from said opening toward the side edges, so that it ma be easily ruptured to permit the removal 0 the tube through the top.

3. A carton for holding a vacuum tube or the like, comprising an outer casing, an inner box portion secured to the outer casing and projecting above the same and having a top with an 0 ening adapted to fit the base of the tube at not large enough topermit passage of the larger portion thereof, a neck portion fitting within the inner box portion beneath said top and having an opening to fit the smaller portion of the bulb, means for closing and sealing the lower end of said casing after the tube has been placed within the inner box portion with its base projecting through said opening, so that the tube may not be removed from the carton Without breaking the seal or some other part of the carton, and a removable cover adapted to fit over the projecting portion ,of the inner box to protect the base of the tube.

4. A carton for holding a vacuum tube or the like, comprising an outer casing, an inner box portion secured to the outer casing and projecting above the same and having a top with an opening adapted to fit the base of the tube, a neck portion fitting within the inner box portion beneath said top and having an opening to fit the smaller portion of the bulb, a flap adapted to close the lower end of the inner box portion, means for sealing the same after the tube has been placed within the inner box portion with its base projecting through said opening, said top having rows of perforations extending from said opening toward the side edges, so that it may be easily ruptured to permit the removal of the tube through the top, and packing adapted to surround the bulb between the fiap and said neck portion and to hold the latter against said top.

5. A carton for vacuum tubes and the like comprising, in combination, a sealed casing and a removable cover therefor, said casing having a. perforation in its top through which the neck of the tube projects into the cover so that it may be tested without removal from the casing, and having provision to be torn or ruptured so that the tube may be easily removed from the casing; the construction being such that a new tube may not be removed and an old one substituted therefor without detection.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own, I have hereto afiixed my signature.

STEPHEN J. LEO.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2868428 *Jun 1, 1955Jan 13, 1959Continental Can CoBottle shipping container with internal yieldable supports
US2971640 *Apr 7, 1958Feb 14, 1961Snelling Charles DPlastic foam packaging
US3353655 *Jun 23, 1966Nov 21, 1967Lockheed Aircraft CorpProtective package
US4099612 *Jun 1, 1976Jul 11, 1978Champion International CorporationDisplay carton for lamp fixtures
US5094641 *Aug 1, 1990Mar 10, 1992General Signal CorporationApparatus and method for protecting, installing and removing mercury-vapor lamps
US7377088 *May 3, 2007May 27, 2008Osram Sylvania IncMethod for packaging a light bulb
US20070209329 *May 3, 2007Sep 13, 2007Osram Sylvania Inc.Bottle-pack for light bulb
US20090173536 *Jun 4, 2007Jul 9, 2009Adam KotowiczProtective Cover for Lamps and Related Structural Unit
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/418, 206/459.5, 229/90
International ClassificationB65D5/50
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/5045
European ClassificationB65D5/50D4E