Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1714293 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1929
Filing dateOct 12, 1926
Priority dateSep 9, 1925
Publication numberUS 1714293 A, US 1714293A, US-A-1714293, US1714293 A, US1714293A
InventorsBatdorf Charles S
Original AssigneePurity Cup Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper cup
US 1714293 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. S. BATDORF May 21, 1929.

PAPER CUP Original Filed Sept. 9, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet ATTORNEY y 1929- c. s. BATDORF PAPER CUP Original Filed Sept. 9, 1925 ZSheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR (249/2159 5f 542000,:

ATTORNEY Patented May 21, 1929.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

CHARLES S. BATDORF, F BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, ASS IGNOR T0 PURITY CUP CORPO- RATION, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION oF DELAwARE.

PAPER, CUP.

Original application filed September 9, 1925, Serial No. 55,301. Divided and this application filed October 12, 1926. Serial No. 141,157.

This invention relates to the type of cups other material, such for example as ice cream or the like. Heretofore paper cups, by reason of their construction, had to be made of fairly thick paper, usually freely coated with paraffin, not only because a cheap grade of paper is used but because the paraflin serves as a stiffening means for tending to hold the various formations of such paper cups in set position. The method incidental to the manufacture of such paper cups usually requires the use of heavy paper stock so that the cups will stand up, and the use of moisture and heat to prevent cracking while the necessary folds are being made.

Under the present invention dry and unmoistened water-resisting paper of a comparatively high grade is preferably employed, such paper being much thinner than paper previously employed for paper cups, it being possible under the present invention to make use of paper which is no greater than three thousandths of an inch in thickness, or even somewhat thinner, because of the fact that the cup of the present invention is constructed in such way as to make it possible to use such thin paper. Hence, the improved cups can be made much lighter than cups heretofore on the market.

Also, under the present invention a cup of special construction is provided wherein the sides or side wall of the cup has certain angular flutes, so arranged as to reinforce the cup made preferably of very thin paper, and the mouth edge or lip of the cup being provided with a special beading which isso firm and compact as to be capable of resisting expansion of the lip of the cup or distortion bv ordinary use; so that by reason of such flutes and the heading there is provided a durable self-sustaining, cup capable of convenient handling, and requiring the use of much less paper stock.

These being among the several objects of panying drawings illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention in which,

a Figure 1 is a side elevation of the improved paper cup, which is usually smaller in size than as illustrated;

Figure 2 is a plan, looking into the cup; Figure 3 isa transverse section on the line 3-3 of Figure 1, showing how the flutes commence to turn toward the body of the cup;

Figure 4 is an enlarged vertical sectionthrough one half of the cup, on the line 1-4, Figure 2, for the purpose of more clearly bringing out the flutes, plaits and beading;

Figures 5 and 6 are transverse sections, respectively on the lines 55 and 66, Figure 4;

Figure 7 is an underside plan view of the cup; and 1 Figures 8 and 9 are transverse sections, respictively on the lines 88 and 9-,9, Figure Referring to Figures 1 and 2, the cup is preferably made from one sheet of relatively thin paper and provided with a bottom 10 formed integrally with the side wall 11 which terminates at the lip or mouth end of the cup with a heading 12. Referring to Figures 1, 4, 7. 8 and 9, the paper cup is shown as formed with a series of upwardly extending flutes 13. which are arranged in annular series or otherwise about the side wall 11 of the cup.

the present invention, the same consists of certain features of construction and combinations of parts to be hereinafter described and then claimed with reference to the accom- These flutes form a special feature of the present invention. flutes 13 also stand outwardly or radially from the axis of the cup for a substantial distance through the height of the cup, and these and intermediate portions are of prefcrably flattened V-shape in transverse section, that is the walls of the flutes are flattened against each other, thus tending to reinforce the cup and make it self-sustaining, so as to offer resistance to the pressure of any liquid, for example, which is in the on Furthermore, the outwardly standing utes 13 form somewhat rough ridges or lines of contact for the fingers of the hand which hold the cup, thereby pressing into the soft flesh of the hand and enabling the cup to be held without danger of slipping from the hand It will be seen that the Ill and to offer resistance against crushing by the pressure of the hand. Such flutesalso offer resistance against objectionable yielding to the holding pressure of the fingers, so that in practical use, that is with the cup containing a liquid, they do not crush or flatten down.

The outwardly standing flutes 13, as shown more clearly in Figures 1, 4, 5 and 6, merge, in the upper part of the cup, into plaits 14. which are formed as extensions of the flutes, the flutes being gradually turned toward the main body of the cup and eventually flattened down at 15 on the intermediate portions 16 of the side wall 11 of the cup. It will be seen that at the lip of the cup the flattened down plaits 14 and the intermediate side wall portions 16 are in multiply formation and are turned outwardly, downwardly and inwardly in a curl so as to form the bead ing 12 which reinforces the lipof the cup. At the same time the manner in which the beading is formed tends to lock and hold the plaits 14 together and prevents their unfolding.

The improved cup is preferably of frustoconical shape and hence tapered toward the bottom of the cup. It will be observed that the flutes 13 are preferably so formed that as a whole their outer ridges or lines of contact 17 are of greater taper than the taper of the intermediate portions 16 of the side wall of the cup; that is to say, the ridges 17 of the said flutes, from the bottom of the cup upwardly, slant away from the portions 16 of the side walls which are intermediate of the flutes. This formation imparts a gradually increased reinforcement to the cup from its bottom upwardly. It will be seen that the beading 12 is formed with transverse folded edges 18 throughout its length. which are formed by the juncture between the side walls 16 and the plaits 14. Itwill also be seen that the flutes preferably extend above the intermediate diameter of the cup, and that the flattened down plaits. at the beading follow the circumference of the lip of the cup.

This application is a division of co-pendin g application Serial No. 55,301, filed September 9, 1925.

It is obvious that the invention as described and illustrated is susceptible of more or less modification without departing from the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A paper cup having its sidewall formed about it with a series of upwardly extending, outwardly standing. flutes, the walls of which are flattened against each other, and the outer edges of which, from the bottom of the cup upwardly, slant away from the portions of the side wall which are intermediate the flutes.

2. A tapering paper cup, the srrialler end of which is at the bottom, and the wider end is at the lip, and the cup having its side wall formed about it with a series of upwardly extending, outwardly standing, substantially non-yieldable and non-crushableflutes, the' outer edges of which have a greater taper toward the lip of the cup than the portions between the flutes.

. -3. A paper cup having its side wall formed about it with a series of upwardly extending, outwardly standing, substantially non-yieldable and non-crushable flutes, said flutes extending above the intermediate diameter of the cup and terminating in flattened plaits which follow the circumference of the lip of the cup.

- 4. A paper cup, comprising a side wall and a beading at the lip, the side wall formed about it with a series of upwardly extending, outwardly standing substantially non-yieldable and non-crushable flutes, said flutes extending above the intermediate diameter of the cup, and terminating in flattened plaits, said plaits successively overlapped at their terminals, whereby the beading is formed from the terminals of the plaits and of the intermediate portions of the side wall.

5. A paper cup, comprising a side wall and a beading at the lip, the side wall formed about it with a series of upwardly extending, outwardly standing, flutes, which are of substantially flattened V-shape in cross-section, said flutes extending above the intermediate diameter of the cup and the flutes being overturned, and terminating in flattened plaits, and the beading formed from the terminals of the plaits and of the intermediate portions of the side wall, the outer edges of the said flutes converging from the plaits toward the bottom of the cup.

6. A paper cup, comprising a side wall and a heading at the lip, the side wall formed about it with a series of upwardly extending, outwardly standing, substantially non-yieldable and non-crushable flutes, said flutes extending above the intermediate diameter of the cup, and being over-turned and terminating in flattened plaits before reaching the beading, and the beading formed from the terminals of the plaits and of the intermedlate portions of the side wall, the cup tapering and the outer edges oftlie flutes havmg a greater taper than the portions between the flutes.

7. A paper cup having its side wall formed about it with a series of npwardly extending, outwardly standing, substantially non-yieldable and non-crushable flutes, said flutes extending above the intermediate diameter of the cup and being over-turned and terminatmg in plaits which are flattened plaits and overlapped following the circumference of the l p of the cup, and means for holding and binding the plaits in flattened down position.

8. A paper cup tapered toward the bottom and having its side wall formed about it with a series of upwardly extending, outwardly standing, substantially non-yieldable flutes which are substantially of flattened V-shape in cross-section.

9. A paper cup, the side wall of which is formed about it with a series of upwardly extending, substantially non-yieldable and noncrushable flutes, the flutes being laterally over-turned and flattened into plaits at the top of the cup before reaching the rim of the 10 cup, and the plaits and the adjacent portions of the wall of the cup being formed into a heading at the rim of the cup.

CHARLES S. BATDORF.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5501039 *Jul 26, 1994Mar 26, 1996Highland Supply CorporationMethod of forming a flower pot or flower pot cover with controlled pleats
US5577988 *Feb 15, 1994Nov 26, 1996Southpac Trust International, Inc.Flower pot or flower pot cover with fins
US5616378 *May 30, 1995Apr 1, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5616382 *May 30, 1995Apr 1, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5618596 *May 30, 1995Apr 8, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5620761 *May 30, 1995Apr 15, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5622754 *May 30, 1995Apr 22, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5633056 *May 30, 1995May 27, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5674577 *May 30, 1995Oct 7, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5677021 *May 30, 1995Oct 14, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5681625 *May 30, 1995Oct 28, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5683765 *May 30, 1995Nov 4, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5753327 *May 30, 1995May 19, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5976647 *Aug 7, 1997Nov 2, 1999Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US6311431Jun 21, 2000Nov 6, 2001Southpac Trust International, Inc.Pot cover with preset folds
US6427381Aug 24, 2001Aug 6, 2002Southpac Trust Int'l. Inc.Pot cover with preset folds
US6484442Aug 4, 2000Nov 26, 2002Southpac Trust International, Inc.Sheets of material having forming indicia for forming into flower pots or plant covers and methods
US6615541Aug 6, 2002Sep 9, 2003Southpac Trust International, Inc.Sheets of material having forming indicia for forming into flower pots or plant covers and methods
US8484891Nov 30, 2012Jul 16, 2013Wanda M. Weder & William F. StraeterDecorative flower pot cover formed of polymeric materials having a matte or textured finish simulating the texture and/or appearance of paper
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/400, 229/4.5
International ClassificationB65D1/26, B65D1/22
Cooperative ClassificationB65D1/265
European ClassificationB65D1/26B