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Publication numberUS1714760 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1929
Filing dateMay 18, 1927
Priority dateMay 18, 1927
Publication numberUS 1714760 A, US 1714760A, US-A-1714760, US1714760 A, US1714760A
InventorsBloomberg Joseph E
Original AssigneeBloomberg Joseph E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe jacket
US 1714760 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 28, 1929. j E, BLOQMBERG 1,714,760

I SHOE JACKET Filed May 18, 1927 WI TN ESSES Patented May 28, 1929 UfaiiE STTE 1,714,7e Fries,

JOSEPH n. BLOOMBERG, or MILWAUKEE, Wisconsin.

SHOE JACKET.

Application filed May 18,

The invention further consists in the several I features hereinafter set forth and more particularly defined by theannexed claims.

In the accompanying drawings,

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a skate-carrying shoe having applied thereto a shoe jacket embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a similar view of a modified form of'shoe j acket; V

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the skate with the shoe jacket in place Fig; 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of Fig. 1, and i l F i g. 5 is a transverse sectional detailviewof the shoe jacket taken on the line 55 of Fig. 1.

In these drawings, the numeral 10 designates an ice skate of conventional type including the usual pillars 11, 12 and 18, permanently attached to the bottom of a skating shoe 14, the pillars 11 and 12 being of hollow tubular construction and the shoe 14 being provided with the usual front lacing 15 for closing the shoe on the foot.

In that form of the invention shown in Fig. 1 the shoe jacket or cover comprises a lined upper 16 secured to a bottom 17, the upper covering the shoe 14 from toe to heel in the manner of an overshoe, and the bottom 17 engaging the bottom or soleof the shoe 14; while in that form of the invention shown in Fig. 2 the upper 16 and bottom 17 cover only the forward portions of the shoe. In each instance the upper is formed of complementary right and left halves, which are joined at their forward toe portions by a sewn leather strip 18, and the remaining parted forward portions of the upper are joined by a lacing 19, there being a gusset 19 under the lacing. The interior of the upper is lined with a suitable heat-insulating material 20, preferably sheepskin, and this is preferably finished at exposed edges by binding 21. The upper 16 is secured to the bottom 17 in any suitable manner, such as indicated in Fig. 5, and the bottom 17 is provided with a central longitudinal slit 22 which extends the entire length of the bottom except for that portion of the 1927. Serial No. 192,343.

bottom forward of the front skate pillar 13, the upper 16 having a slit 22 down its rear portion communicating with the slit 22. .The slit 22 merges at intervals with enlarged openings 23, 24 and 25, the edges of which fitclosely about the skate pillars 11, 12- and 13, and the interior of the bottom is provided with a lining 26 sewn thereto to provide both reenforcement and additional heat insulation.

In order to close the bottom 17 of the shoe jacketalong the sole of the skate shoe, the bottom 17 is provided along its parted edges with hooks 27 receivinga crossed lacing 28 which passes on oppositesides of the skate pillars 11 and 12 and is tied preferably at .the forward end of the skate. For closing the rear parted portions of the upper 16 about the rear portion of the skate shoe 14 transmay then be spreadlaterally and. embraced about theskate shoe, the glove fasteners 30 being then closed, and the lacing 28 being engaged along the bottom hooks 27 to substantially. close the gap along the bottom. The operation is similar with the shoe jacket of Fig. 2, except that the clasps are omitted and the jacket is prevented from becoming displaced since the enlarged openings in the bottom closely surround the forward skate pillars 12 and 13. When placing the skate shoe on the foot the usual front lacing 15 of the shoe is opened, as well as the front lacing 19 of the shoe jacket, and these lacings are then closed in succession.

When it is desirable to employ a skate strap 31, the forward portion of the strap bears against the lined upper of the shoe jacket,

thereby preventing uncomfortable localized 10o pressure on the foot. When removing the skate shoe from the foot, the lacings 19 and 15 are opened in succession and the shoe jacket can be left on the skate.

By means of the shoe jacket of this inven- 105 The shoe jackets also protect the shoes and feet against injury by the skate blades ofother skaters. Since the shoe'jackets are of such construction that they can be secured snugly and firmly in place on the skate shoes, the ankles are given additional support, thereby dispensing with the use of ankle braces.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. The combination, with a shoe having a skate thereon, of a shoe jacket comprising a lined upper receiving said shoe, a bottom socured to said upper to substantially cover the sole portion of the skate shoe and parted longitudinally for receiving skate elements therethrough, and a lacing for securing said parted bottom sections about said skate elements.

2. The combination, with a shoe having a skate thereon including spaced supporting pillars permanently attached to the sole of said shoe, of a shoe jacket comprising a lined upper receiving said shoe, a bottom secured to said upper and parted longitudinally to closely surround said pillars, and means for securing together the parted portions of said bottom.

3. The combination, with a shoe having a skate thereon, of a shoe jacket comprising a lined upper receiving said shoe and having a closable top opening, a bottom secured to said upper to substantially cover the under surface of the skate shoe and parted longitudi-- nally for receiving. skate elements therethrough, the opening between said parted bottom sections continuing upwardly along the rear of said upper, and means for securing together the parted portions of said bottom and the rear parted portions of said upper.

4. The combination, with a shoe having a skate thereon, of a shoe jacket comprising a heat-retaining upper receiving said shoe and having a closable top opening, adjustable means for closing said opening, and a bottom secured to said upper to substantially cover the sole portion of the skate shoe and secured together along said sole portion, whereby said jacket may be secured in snugly fitting engagement with said shoe to form an additional bracing means for the foot.

The combination, with a shoe having a skate thereon, of a shoe jacket comprising a heat-retaining upper receiving said shoe and having a closable top opening, adjustable means for closing said opening, a bottom secured to said upper to substantially cover the sole portion of the skateshoe, said bottom being longitudinally slotted along its central portion to receive skate elements therethrough, and means for securing together the slotted portions of said bottom along said sole portion.

6. The combination, with a shoe having a skate thereon, of a shoe jacket comprising a lined upper receiving said shoe therein, a bottom secured to said upper to substantially cover the sole portion of the skate shoe and being parted longitudinally for receiving skate elements therethrough, and detachably fastening means for securing the parted bot tom sections along said sole portion and about said skate elements.

In testimony whereof, I aflix my signature.

J OSEPH E. BLOOMBERG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3027660 *May 23, 1960Apr 3, 1962Werner Arnold JWrap-around overshoe for skater's shoe
US3178195 *Jun 14, 1962Apr 13, 1965Metcalf Phyllis CSkate warmer
US4351537 *Jan 16, 1980Sep 28, 1982Warrington Inc.Multipart skate
US5234230 *Dec 10, 1992Aug 10, 1993Crane Scott AAnkle and foot protective device for attachment to a skate
US7021663 *Oct 14, 2003Apr 4, 2006Moran Richard JPuck deflecting hockey skate covering
US7293782 *May 20, 2005Nov 13, 2007Angela L. JenningsCar model attachment for standard skates
US20050258629 *May 20, 2005Nov 24, 2005Jennings Angela LCar model attachment for standard skates
US20080203719 *Feb 26, 2007Aug 28, 2008Phyllis BakerRe-New a Skate
US20100223814 *Mar 6, 2009Sep 9, 2010Jennifer Yi IgnacioSkate cover
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/811
International ClassificationA43B5/18, A43B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/18
European ClassificationA43B5/18