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Publication numberUS1715072 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 28, 1929
Filing dateDec 2, 1927
Priority dateDec 2, 1927
Publication numberUS 1715072 A, US 1715072A, US-A-1715072, US1715072 A, US1715072A
InventorsWalter K Medernach
Original AssigneeSouthern Asbestos Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulating tape
US 1715072 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

9 1929. w. K. MEDERNACH 1.7%,072

INSULATING TAPE Filed Dec, 2, 1927 Patented May 28,1929.

entree s'riaras PATENT 335,972 1 Fries;

WALTER K. HEDEBNAGE, OE CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA, ASSIGNOR TO SOUTH EBN 'ASBESTOS COMPANY, OOBEORA'IION OI DELAWARE.

INCORPORATED, OF-CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA, A.

msnra'rmc Tarn.

Application filed December 2, 1927. Serial No. 237,854.

The invention has relation to strips or tapes of the class employed for heat insulating purposes by being wrapped spirally about a pipe, for example a steam pipe, to form a covering 5 therefor" 'to prevent the loss of heat. One

known type of such insulating strips or tapes is in the form of a'tubular covering or sheath of asbestos fabric enclosing a body or filling of asbestos in the formof rovings.

The invention is more particularly an improvement in insulating strips or tapes of the type just mentioned. The proper sha e, &c., of such a fairly thick band, two or three inches'wide, and the strip or tape should be pliable to permit it to be laid in a close spiral about the pipe to which it is applied, as well as soft and conformable to enable it to be shaped and fitted smoothly to the exterior of the pipe with the successive turns of the spiral in snug contact with one another.

The general object of the invention is to produce a strip or tape answering the requirements just noted, and which while possessing the desired thickness, softness, pliability, and conformability, shall retain its flat shape, without liability to lateral displacement of the contained body or filling of heat insulating material. A special object in this connection is to produce an insulating strip or tape which a will not, in being handled, become compressed laterally into a more or less cylindrical or rope-like form requiring to be worked back into shape suitable for being wrapped spirally around a pipe or the like.

Illustrative emb diments of the various features which are comprised in the invention isshown in the drawings, in which latter,-'

Fig. 1 is a view showing the application of 40 an insulating strip or tape to a plpe. I Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a portion of tom of the next (passes between the two. When an insulatitng tape containing the said-features.

Fig. 3 is a view in cross-section on line 3, 3, of F 1g. 2.

1y thick body or filling composed of alseries composed of strip or tape is that of a at .The said layers are united or joined with ings.

of large, loose, soft rovings' 1, 1, &c., extending lengthwise of the tape and disposed side I by side and in close contact with one another; protecting and confining layers 2, 2, of fabric disposed above and below the said series and arns or threads of asbestos; and arms or t reads (referred to again later herein) intervening between the said rovings so as to confine the-respective rovings from lateral displacement and from overriding one another. The layers 2, 2, by which the rovings 1, 1, &c., constituting the core or'filling are pro-' tected and confined consist of coarse-textured loosely woven fabric produced by the interlacing of yarns or threads of asbestos; in this instance through the interweaving of weftthreads 21, 21, with warp-threads 22, 22. Other known methods of fabric-construction may be adopted in practice, if preferred.

each other at the ma gins of the strip, in this instance concurrent y with the production of the fabric, forming thereby a tubular fabric sheath enclosing the rovings. The tubular sheath form of covering is preferred, though sometimesthe layers may remain not omed at the said margins. I

The yarn or threads by which the respective rovmgs are confined from lateral displacement and from overriding one another comprise, in Fig. 3, certain of the weftthreads, and binder-war sso-called binders13, 13. The weft-t reads which serve to confine the rovings from lateral displace ment extend transversely of the series of rovthe other, and are interwoven with the rov- Each of such weft-threads alternately overlies and underlies successive rovlngs, and in passing from the top of one to the hotand in the bottom layer, so that'they connect upon thebinder-Warps alone to confine the.

the strip or tape properly to a tending large, loose,

and bind together the two layers. They extend between adjacent rovings, 1npass ng from one layer to the other. In addition to their function of holding the rovings from lateral displacement, they keep the layers of fabric from spreading apart. Thereby they operate to maintain the flat shape of the strip or tape. i

'In some cases I m y omit the binder-warps or binders, as in Fig. 4, and depend upon the weft-threads alone to confine the rovings from displacement relative to layers 2, 2; in other cases, I may omit the weft-threads which are thus utilized in Fig. 3 and depend rovings from displacement relative to said layers.

In the absence of confining threads, the strip or tape in being handled would be liable to lose its flat shape and become crushed together laterally into moreor lessrounded or cylindrical form, with lateral displacement of the rovings and overriding of one thereof upon another, causing therebymore or less inconvenience in applying pipe or the like This drawback and resulting inconvenience are obviated by my invention, while at the same timerny strip or tape has a loose yieldlng consistency and pliability such that the rovings-are le t free enough from each other and from the sheath to permit a certam amount of relative movement of the respectlve rovings and the sheath lengthwise sufficient .to allow the respective rovlugs and sheath to accommodate themselves to the spiral disposition of the strip or tape in being wrapped about a pipe, and to any differences of tension at the two margins of the strip or tape. i,

Whatl claim as my invention is, 1. An insulating tape adapted to be wrapped spirally about a pipe or the like, composed of a series of longitudinally exinsulatlng material disposed side by side and 1n close contact with one another, protecting and confininglayers of coarse-textured loosely woven fabric above and below the said series composed of yarns or threads of asbestos, and yarns or threads intervenlng between the rovings so as to confine the respective rovings from lateral displacement and from overriding one another, the said tape having consistency and pliability permitting slight longitudinal shift of the rovings relative to one another.

2; An insulating tape adapted to be wrapped spirally about a pipe or the. like, composed of a series of large, loose, soft longitudinally extending rovings disposed side by side and in close contact with onesoft rovings of heat another, protecting and confining layers of" fabric above and below the said series composed of yarns or threads of asbestos, and

yarns or threads extending transversely of- :the series, nterwoven Wltlh and intervening between the rovings, whereby the respective rovings are restrained from lateral displacement relative to one another and thereby from overriding one another.

3. An insulating tape adapted to be- 'wrapped spirally about a pipe or the like,

composed of a series of large, loose, soft lon gitudinally extending rovings disposed side by side and in close contact with one another,

protecting and confining layers of fabric above and below the said series composed of yarns or threads of'asbestos, and yarns or threads extending transversely of the serles and interwoven with the rovings and with the said layer of fabric.

4. An insulating tape adapted to be wrapped spirally about a pipe or the like composed of a series of large, loose, soft rovings disposed side by side and in close contact with one another, protecting and confining layers of fabric above and below the said series composed of yarns or threads i of asbestos, and means for confimn the respective rovings from lateral disp acement and'from overriding one another, comprising yarns or threads extending transversely of thesaid series and interwoven with the rovings and also binders extending lengthwise and binding the said layers together between the respective rovings.

5. An insulating tape adapted to be wrapped spirally about a pipe or the like,

composed of a series of large, loose, soft rovings of asbestos disposed side by side and in close contact with one anotheiya sheath composed of asbestos yarns or threads interlaced in the form of a tubular fabric enclosing the said rovings, with yarns or threads intervening between the rovings so as to confine the respective rovings from lateral displacement. and from overriding one another.

6. An insulating tape adapted to be wrapped spirally about a pipe or the like, composed of a series of large, loose, soft one another, a

composed of asbestos yarns or rovings so as to confine asbestos disposed side by side 'rovlngs of asbestos disposed side by side and in close contact with one another, a

sheath composed. of asbestos yarns or threads interlaced in the form of a tubular fabric enclosing the said rovings and means for holding the tapein flat shape and confining the respective rovings from lateral displacement and from overriding one another,-comprising binders passing between the respective rovings and binding the top and bottom .faces of the sheathto each other. w

8. An insulating tape adapted to be wrapped spirally about a pipe or the like, composed of a series of large, loose, soft rovings of asbestos disposed side by side and in close contact with one another, a sheath composed of asbestos yarns or threads interlaced in the form of a tubular fabric enclosing the said rovings, and means for confining the respective rovings from lateral displacement and from overriding tending yarns or threads engaging'with the sheath at its lateral margins and interwoven with the said rovings intermediate such margins, and binders passings between the respective rovings and binding the top and bottom faces of the sheath toeach other.

WALTER n mnnmmcn.

one another, comprising transversely ex-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5301960 *Apr 30, 1992Apr 12, 1994Suggs Group, Inc.Improved spirally-formed seal for shafts and valve stems
US5395469 *Feb 22, 1993Mar 7, 1995Suggs, Jr.; James W.Method of making an improved spirally-formed seal for shafts and valve stems
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/408, 428/443, 277/627, 139/420.00D, 428/365
International ClassificationD03D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03D2700/0122, D03D3/00
European ClassificationD03D3/00