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Publication numberUS1715907 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1929
Filing dateMay 10, 1928
Priority dateMay 10, 1928
Publication numberUS 1715907 A, US 1715907A, US-A-1715907, US1715907 A, US1715907A
InventorsDragelin Joel G
Original AssigneeDragelin Joel G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automobile washer
US 1715907 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 4, 1929. J. G. DRAGELIN AUTOMOBILE WASHER Filed May 10, 1928 m "fl/110111111 IIIIIIIIIIIIIII Qvwwtoz MM QWMMM3 Patented June 4, 1929.

UNITED STATES JOEL G. DRAGELIN, or NEW YORK, N. Y.

AUTOMOBILE WASHER.

Application filed May 10,

This invention relates to fountain sponges for washing automobiles, store windows and other bodies having a high finish.

The main object of my invention is to provide a sponge with such related structure as to facilitate washing with the same without pause and without subjecting the hands to immersion or wetting, and which sponge structure may be constantly supplied with a stream of water from a hose or the like.

Other. objects, as well as the advantages attained by my invention will appear hereinafter as the specification proceeds.

In the accompanyingdrawing:

Fig. 1 is a top view of a fountain sponge made according to my invention and embodyingthe features of the same.

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section of the same for revealing the interior construction and relations of the parts.

In both the views the same reference numerals indicate the same parts.

In the practice of my invention a pipe 1 is bent at one end at 18 and threaded into a plate 12 about whose flaring edge 16 a heavy rib 15 of a resilient strainer 13 is retained by the contractile force of said rib. The pipe 1 feeds water directly into the resulting chamber 17, whence the water tends. to pass out through a plurality of apertures as indicated at 14.

However, the rounded edge or rib 15 of the strainer 13, which may be of rubber serves another purpose together with the plate 12. A somewhat extensive sponge 6, preferably of rubber is disposed beneath strainer 13, and its peripheral edges drawn over edge 15 and extended in upon plate 12, upon which the spon e edges are conveniently clamped by means of a clamping plate 2. A screw 10 is secured in the water distributing plate 12 and extends through the aperture 11 in clamp plate 2 and the latter is drawn and held down by a retaining nut 4 threaded on the screw and centered within a rib 5 on the plate, which also has a peripheral stifiening rib 3 thereon. The aperture 11 is somewhat enlarged for clearin the screw when lifting the clamp plate up a ong curve 18 of the pipe in order to permit changing sponges.

If the pipe is connected to a hose and water is turned on, the latter will pass from the pipe into chamber 17, as mentioned, thence out 1928. Serial N0. 276,616.

through apertu ":14 in the strainer, and'then through the 6 to any object upon which the sponge is used.

pipe forn'is a convenient handle for this purpose, but when the sponge is raised into a high position, water will tend to drip along and follow the outside of the pipe and tend to wet the hands. In order to eliminate this trouble a drip shield 7 is provided upon the pipe, a collar 8 upon the shield hav ing a set screw 9 for holding the'shiel'd in any position along the pipe, so that water from the sponge willrun along the pipe only to the shield, which will readily shed the same.

Thus the sponge may be used to dislodge dust and dirt, while the constant flow of water from the sponge will flush the dirt away, and yet the hands of the operator may remain perfectly dry,

Having now described my invention, I claim 1. A fountain sponge including a feed pipe, a distributing plate attached to one end of said pipe, a detachable independent strainer supported upon said plate, a sponge overlying said strainer and enveloping the same, and means to retain said sponge in position over 'said strainer.

2. A fountain sponge including a feed pipe terminating in a distributing plate, a resilient strainer covering one face of said plate and enveloping the peripheral edge thereof in constricted manner for ret-ainingsaid strainer in position, a sponge covering said strainer and enveloping the same so that the edges of said sponge envelope said constricted portion of the strainer, and means retained by said plate for clamping the edges of saidspongethereon.

3. A fountain sponge including a feed pipe having a water shield near the end thereof and a distributing plate on said extremity, a flared edge on said plate, a resilient strainer for covering said plate having a thickened edge constricted about said flared plate edge to retain said strainer thereon, a clamping plate adjustably attached in spaced manner to the other side of said plate, and a porous body secured between the edges of said plates in such manner as to completely envelope said strainer.

4. A fountain sponge including a' feed pipe terminating in a concave distributing plate, a strainer removably attached to said plate to ing through the other and provided beyond the latter with an adjusting and retaining 10 nut.

I In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification, this 9th day of May, 1928. I

JOEL G. DRAGELIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2538542 *Dec 16, 1948Jan 16, 1951Tucker Jack EMop construction
US2564031 *Dec 13, 1947Aug 14, 1951Rich Lloyd RAutomobile and window washer
US2647273 *Nov 2, 1949Aug 4, 1953Eagle Pennie SLiquid applicator
US2769995 *Mar 10, 1954Nov 13, 1956Michael KleinHousehold sponge cleaning device
US2829393 *Aug 26, 1954Apr 8, 1958Dorothy G MeyerCosmetics and lotion applicator
US3343200 *Feb 26, 1965Sep 26, 1967During WalterDevice for the removal of lime deposits in toilet bowls by applying suitable solvents
US4516870 *Sep 19, 1983May 14, 1985Teiji NakazatoGriddle cleaning device
US5052840 *Oct 26, 1989Oct 1, 1991Ilona EnevoldsonMop useful in the cleaning of tubs
US5984555 *Oct 2, 1998Nov 16, 1999Samad; VicarDual toilet brush
US6061862 *Aug 28, 1998May 16, 2000Whit CorporationCleaning apparatus
EP1057443A2 *May 31, 2000Dec 6, 2000Diversified Dynamics CorporationCleaning device and methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/15, 15/244.1, 401/203, 15/248.1
International ClassificationA47L1/08, A47L1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L1/08
European ClassificationA47L1/08