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Publication numberUS1716294 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1929
Filing dateMar 5, 1928
Priority dateMar 5, 1928
Publication numberUS 1716294 A, US 1716294A, US-A-1716294, US1716294 A, US1716294A
InventorsBond Joseph E
Original AssigneeBond Joseph E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Agitator
US 1716294 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. E. BOND AGITATOR June 4, 192

Filed March 5, 1928 a w w w 6 J 6 2 J y Z a E w 5 6 l J 2 m MM a M M *1 u M v n 0 m l d m f .I. J J %L@. WW A Ev 2 a Z Patented June 4, 1929.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

AGITATOR.

Application filed March 5, 1928. Serial No. 259,078.

My invention relates to the art of paper making and particularly to means for agitating paper pulp.

In the development of the art it has been found possible to greatly increase the capacity of a given equipment by increasing the density (or, in other words, lessening the fluidity) of the pulp during its treatment preceding delivery to the Fourd riniers.

While in the old practice a 2 pulp was considered proper and of the maximum density possible, it is now common to deal with 6% solutions, with correspondingly increased production capacity.

However, many diflicult problems are encountered in handling pulp of this density due to its lack of fluidity and its tendency to mass or cake in the storage or treatment tanks and containers. This tendency is inherent in the nature of the material under treatment due to its fibrous character and pulp in the liquid and to maintain a uniformdensity throughout the entire body of material it must be kept in motion and the motion producing means should have a tendency to break up and tear apart any large or small masses of pulp. In the old practice the mixture was kept in motion by means of paddles or impellers in the tank,

but this apparatus had very little tendency to breakup masses of pulp, and was wholly ineffective with stock of increased density. Furthermore, such apparatus required an outlay of power not commensurate with the results secured.

The tanks, chests or containers which are in place and must be utilized for the new plan of operation are of many and varied forms, all of great size, some narrow and of great length, some deep and some round. The problem has been, therefore, to provide means applicable to these various forms of tanks that would insure effective circulation,

the breaking up of pulp masses and the maintenance at all times of a proper consistency throughout the whole volume of material, with a minimum of power expenditure.

Because of the use of various sizes and shapes of storage and agitator tanks, it has been found necessary to modify the usual construction to meet the different requirements. In the invention herein disclosed a relatively tall, round tank is employed and it has been found exceedingly difficult to properly agitate the stock. Accordingly two pumps have been provided each discharging the stock at a different level, through laterally disposed nozzles, the second pump operating only when the stock reaches a predetermined level in the tank. Thus the entire body of stock is constantly broken up and agitated, regardless of the amount in the tank. A float, located in the tank, automatically turns on the pump motor when the stock reaches a predetermined level and stops the motor when the stock falls below that level.

The invention will be more readily understood by reference to the accompanying drawing, in which- Fig. 1 is a plan view of a device constructed according to my invention, and

Fig. 2 is a sectional elevation thereof.

By referring to the drawings and more particularly to Fig. 2, it will be seen that I have provided a relatively deep circular tank 10, having a conical bottom inwhich are located' discharge openings 11, 12. Inlet pipes 11 and 12 are joined to the pump 13, which is operated by the motor 14. An outlet or discharge pipe 15 serves to carry the discharge into the tank. The discharge pipe 15 is located at a convenient height in the tank, and terminates in a plurality of radially disposed nozzles 16, which are directed against the side of the tank 10.

A secondpump 17, operated by the motor 18, has an inlet 19 joined to the pump by a pipe 20. An outlet or discharge pipe 21, serves to carry the pump discharge into the tank 1O. The discharge pipe 21 in the tank is located above and in a plane parallel to the discharge pipe 15, and likewise terminates in a plurality of outwardly disposed nozzles 22.

Within the tank is located a float 23, which is operatively connected by means of the cable 24 and pulleys 25, 26, to the switch box 26. By means of the float 23, the motor 18 may be started and stopped at any predetermined point. The mass within the tank may be drawn off through the discharge aperture 11 and pipe 27.

In operation, a suit-able amount of paper stock is placedin the tank, and the pump 13 caused to operate. The forced discharge of the stock through the nozzles will serve not only to break up the particles, but to impart a motion to the mass adjacent to the nozzles, thus, in a measure, avoiding the tendency of cohesion of the mass.

If more stock is added to the mass already in the tank, the one pump would be unable to circulate the mass sufliciently to' avoid Stratification. The second pump is therefore utilized, it being operatively vconnected to the float 23, so that when the mass within the tank reaches a predetermined level, such as indicated by the float in dotted lines in Fig. 1, the motor will be started. Likewise, when the level is lowered due to stock being drawn oil, the motor 18 will be stopped.

Thus it will be seen that I have provided a device which is simple in operation and yet thoroughly eflicient for the purpose intended. The tank being of circular form, and motion being imparted to the mass, will keep the same constantly moving and prevent Stratification.

Obviously modifications and variations may be made in the device herein illustrated, and I do not Wish to be limited except as indicated in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In combination, a container, a pump having its inlet connected to the bottom of the tank, an outlet pipe extending across the tank and terminating in a plurality of outlets, a second pump having an inlet connected to the lower part of the tank and an outlet pipe extending across the tank at a point materially above said first outlet pipe, a motor for operating said second pump, a float in said tank substantially the level of said second pipe and means operated by said float for starting the motor for operating said second pump when the level of liquid reaches a point above said second pipe.

2. In combination, an open top tank, an exterior pump, having an inlet in the bottom wall of said tank, an outlet pipe extending across said tank and terminating in a plurality of radial outlets, a second ump having an inlet in the bottom. wall 0 said tank, an outlet pipe extending across the tank a material dlstance above said first mentioned outlet and terminating in a plurality of radial ports, a motor for operating said second pump, and automatic means in said tank for operating said second pump at a predetermined liquid level in said tank.

3. In combination, an open top tank, an exterior pump having an inlet in the bottom wall of said tank, an outlet pipe extending across said tank and terminating in a plurality of radially disposed nozzles, a second exterior pump having an inlet in the bottom wall of said tank and an outlet pipe extending across the tank a material distance above said first mentioned outlet and terminating in a plurality of radially disposed nozzles, a motor for operating said second pump, and automatic means in said tank for operating said second pump at a predetermined liquid level in said tank.

4. In combination, an open top tank, an exterior pump having an inlet in the bottom wall of said tank, an outlet pipe therefor passing through and across said tank and terminating in a plurality of radially disposed nozzles, a second exterior pump having an inlet at the bottom of said tank and an outlet pipe passing through and across said tank, and terminating in a plurality of radially disposed nozzles, and automatic means for operating said second pump when the substance within said tank reaches a predetermined level. n

5'. In combination, an open top tank, an exterior pump having an inlet in the bottom wall of said tank, an outlet pipe therefor passing through and across said tank and terminating in a plurality of radially disposed nozzles, a second exterior pump, having an inlet in the bottom of said tank and an outlet p'ipe passing through and across said tank and terminating in a plurality of radially disposed nozzles and a float within said tank, said float being operatively connected to said second motor, whereby to operate said second motor at a preldetermined level of the contents of said tan 6. In combination, an open top tank, an exterior pump having an inlet in the bottom wall of said tank, an outlet pipe therefor passing through and across said tank and terminating in a plurality of radially disposed nozzles a second exterior pump having an inlet in the bottom of said tank and an outlet pipe passing through and across said tank and terminating in a plurality of radially disposed nozzles, and a float within said tank, said float being operatively connected to said second motor, whereby to operate said second motor when the contents of said tank reach the level of said second outlet nozzles.

7. In combination, an open top tank, an exterior pump having an inlet in thebottom wall of said tank, an outlet pipe therefor passing through and across said tank and rality of ram. .y and outwardly disposed terminating in a plurality of radially and nozzles and automatic means for operating outwardly disposed nozzles, 21 second exsaid second pump when the substance within 10 terior pump, having an inlet pipe common said tank reaches a predetermined level.

to said first pipe in the bottom of said tank In testimony whereof I have afiixed my and an outlet pipe passing through and signature.

across said tank, and terminating in a plu- JOSEPH E. BOND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3126258 *Sep 22, 1959Mar 24, 1964United Kingdom Atomic Energy AuthorityHebden
US5615950 *Nov 13, 1995Apr 1, 1997Frei; Alexandra S.Apparatus for preventing sedimentation
US7125162 *Nov 19, 2004Oct 24, 2006Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Gel hydration system
US7229207 *Nov 19, 2004Jun 12, 2007Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Method for gel hydration system
US7309155 *Jun 12, 2004Dec 18, 2007Consolidated Environmental Technologies, Ltd.Tank mixing system and valve therefor
US8162531 *Jun 22, 2006Apr 24, 2012Siemens Industry, Inc.Mixing system for increased height tanks
US20050067336 *Nov 19, 2004Mar 31, 2005Graham Jayce L.Gel hydration system
US20050067351 *Nov 19, 2004Mar 31, 2005Graham Jayce L.Gel hydration system
US20050088573 *Jun 10, 2004Apr 28, 2005Macinnis Alexander G.Unified system for progressive and interlaced video transmission
US20050111297 *Jun 12, 2004May 26, 2005Sarrouh Sami F.Tank mixing system and valve therefor
US20060291326 *Jun 22, 2006Dec 28, 2006Crump J MMixing System for Increased Height Tanks
US20080130404 *Nov 13, 2007Jun 5, 2008Sarrouh Sami FTank mixing system and valve therfor
WO2005036048A1 *Jun 12, 2004Apr 21, 2005Cons Environmental TechnologieTank mixing system and valve therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/134, 366/182.2, 366/137, 366/153.1, 366/341, 366/159.1
International ClassificationD21D5/00, D21D5/28
Cooperative ClassificationD21D5/28
European ClassificationD21D5/28