Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1716628 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1929
Filing dateSep 5, 1925
Priority dateSep 5, 1925
Publication numberUS 1716628 A, US 1716628A, US-A-1716628, US1716628 A, US1716628A
InventorsBenjamin Gittleman
Original AssigneeBenjamin Gittleman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package
US 1716628 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June ll, 1929. B. GITTLEMAN PACKAGE Filed Sept. 5, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet l @72b/fa?? /ZJ mm. aai van B. GITTLEMAN June ll, 1929.

PACKAGE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 5, 1925 Patented June 1l, 19.29.

-, UNITED STATES BENJAMIN GITTLEMAN, OF PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND.

PACKAGE.

Application filed September My invention relates to 'display boxes for packing shoelacings and liketlexible articles. I-litherto, lacings and like articleshave been packed after being assembled in pairs, in

5 loose bulk form in boxes. In this manner, in

selling said lacings the desired number must be counted out each time. Employing my improved display boxes, I pack a detinite number of shoelace packagesyeach compi-.ising a pair of laeiiigs folded and banded together in side by side relation, in the usual manner, compaetly in side by side relation in superimposed piles in each box, a definite number of the smaller .display boxes being adapted to be packed in side relation in larger boxes. l'he larger boxes are adapted to be sol-d to the wholesaler, who in turn `sells the individual smaller dozen boxes to the retailer, who in turn removes the shoelaces from the smaller display box and sells them individually in due course to the ultimate consumer. My method of packing thus provides a facile method of counting the laeiiigs, and insures against mistakes in counting. If one slioelace package is missing it is immediately apparent thus preventing the pilfering of a single pair of lacings. y

F or the box intended to be sold by the wholesaler to the retailer containing a definite number of lacing packages I preferably employ an ordinary flexible cardboard box having a substantially rectangular aperture in the cover thereof for display purposes of lesser length than the cover. I am aware that boxes of this general configuration with a retaining layer of transparent paper or other material having been employed for packing candyand similar small articles. I am also aware that similar boxes have been employed for packing articles of apparel, such as garters, etc., butin order to retain the garters, Suspenders, or similar articles within said box, it has been necessary to employ flexible means such as cards and bridges to retain the articles of apparel within the box and prevent them falling out of the aperture in the cover. Due to the specific nature of the lexiblearticles, I employ such as the lacing packages, each comprising a pair of shoelacings folded and banded together in side by side relation, the folds thereof being substantially the length of the box, and by compactly packing said flexible articles in superimposed piles in side by side relation within 55 said box, the flexible articles are so compressed that when the cover is closed the ends 5, 1925. Serial No. 54,783.

of the individual lacing packages underly the ends of the cover of said box exterior of said aperture to coinpactly retain said shoelace packages within said box Without the necessity of a retaining layer of transparent paper or means sUCh as bridges, cards, etc., formel ly employed to retain articles of apparel within said box.

As stated, the smaller display boxes are sold to the retailer who in turn sells the individual pairs of lacings to the ultimate consinner.v Due to the inherent nature of the lacing packages, and the method employed .in packing them within said box, in order to remove the individual lacing packages from said box it is merely necessary to grasp said package through said aperture, and lift it therefrom, the flexible package bending to permit withdrawal from said aperture. I thus provide a true combination between the articles I employ within said box and said box to effect the two new results: l-to retain said articles in sai-d box without other means and 2-to permit withdrawal of individual articles through the aperture of said box Without taking of the cover.

Further objects of my invention are to provide a clean, attractive and neat means for displaying and packing` laeiiigs and like articles.

These and such 'other objects of my inveni display box in open position showing the lac-l ing` packages packed therein.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the compactly packed smaller display box with the lacing packages packed therein in closed position.

F i g. 5 is a perspective view illustrating how the individual shoelace packages may be withdrawn from the aperture in the cover of the smaller display box.

In the drawings, wherein like characters of reference indicate like parts throughout, 10 generally indicates' a slioelace package,

normally comprising a pair of shoe or other lacings l2, folded and banded together in side by side relation.

For sale in dozen or other multiple lots to retailers I provide the box 14 usually made of cardboard having the usual cover 16 adapted to have the usual display figures thereon. 'lhe cover 16 of said box is provided with a substantially rectangular aperture 18 of lesser length than said cover for display purposes. A definite number of shoelace packages 1() or like flexible articles are then packed compactly in side by side relation in superimposed piles Within said box. l/Vhen the cover 16 is closed in the usual fashion, the shoelace packages 10 or like flexible articles, due to their inherent iexible nature are compressed Within said box by said cover, the ends 20 of said individual lacing packages underlying the ends of said cover 16 exterior of said aperture Which thus cooperates to retain said flexible lacing packages within said box.

After said individual smaller boxes have been sold to the retailer', in order for him to Withdraw each individual package 10 through the aperture 18 of said box, it is obvious that it is merely necessary to grasp the centrally banded portion 19 of the package 10 as shown in Fig. 5 in full lines and on lifting or' said package 10 upwards, the flexible ends 20 thereofl may bend so as to permit the package 10 to be Withdrawn upwards out of said box. When the package 10 is completely removed through said aperture 18, it is obvious that the iexible ends 2O Will once more bend back causing the package l() toresume its original position, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 5.

l provide a larger box 24 into which a detinite number of the said smaller boxes 14 are adapted to be packed in side by side relation. It is obvious that this larger box 24 provides a neat means for the Wholesaler to display the merchandise to the purchasing retailer. As usual, display insignia may be placed on the top of both the larger and smaller boxes, and

on the bands of the individual shoelace packages. It is obvious that the insignia on the bands of the shoelace packages 10 Will be visible through the aperture 18 of the smaller box 14: When packed as explained.

It is obvious that in place of shoelacings,

corset or any other type of laciugs', may be employed and similarly packed. lt is also obvious that instead of lacing packages, other types of flexible articles substantially the length of the smaller displayT boxes may be employed. Y

lt is understood that my invention is not limited to the specific embodiment shown and that various deviations may be made therefrom, Without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A shoe lace display and dispensing package, comprising a box having a hinged cover With an elongated longitudinally disposed dispensing opening therein, in combination with a number of folded and banded packages of shoelaces, said packages being packed into the box side by side and extending in the same direction as the long axis of the dispensing opening in the cover, the ends of the shoe lace packages extending beyond the ends of the dispensing opening, and being extracted by lifting them at their centers out of the dispensing opening, causing the packages of laces to flex and the ends to be released from underneath the ends of the cover.

2. A shoe lace display and dispensing package comprising a box having a cover hinved thereto with an elongated longitudinally isposed dispensing opening cut therein spaced from at least one side edOfe of the cover, in combination with a number of folded and banded packages of shoe laces, said packages being packed into the box side by side and extending in the same direction as the long axis of the dispensing opening in the cover, the ends of the shoe lace packages extending beyond the ends of the dispensing opening, and being retained by the top of the cover, While a package of laces at one side is substantially covered and retained by the top side portion of the cover, the laces being extracted by lifting them at their centers out of the dispensing opening causing the packages of laces to flex and the ends to bereleased from underneath the ends of the cover.

In testimony whereof I aiiix my signature.

BENJAMIN GITTLEMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2881947 *Feb 11, 1954Apr 14, 1959Western Electric CoWire dispenser
US3351209 *Aug 10, 1965Nov 7, 1967Diamond Crystal Salt CoPacket dispenser
US3785478 *May 6, 1971Jan 15, 1974Drori ARecloseable carton
US3872968 *Mar 5, 1973Mar 25, 1975Christie Manufacturing CompanyShoelace package
US4073404 *Sep 27, 1976Feb 14, 1978Maryland Cup CorporationDispensing carton for wrapped drinking straws
US4252236 *May 15, 1979Feb 24, 1981Champion International CorporationCarton with opening for controlled dispensing
US5163554 *Jan 10, 1992Nov 17, 1992Merit Medical Systems, Inc.System and method for packaging coils of tubing
US5309604 *Mar 11, 1993May 10, 1994Merit Medical Systems, Inc.Coiling/uncoiling device for tubing
US5494152 *Jul 23, 1993Feb 27, 1996The Ensign-Bickford CompanyDetonator packaging system
US6347700May 4, 2000Feb 19, 2002The Ensign-Bickford CompanyComposite package for explosive items
US6382551Apr 19, 2000May 7, 2002Medical Action Industries Inc.Multiple-size bag dispenser
US7513366 *Jan 8, 2008Apr 7, 2009Mitchellace, Inc.Method and package for displaying shoelaces
US20060231043 *Apr 19, 2005Oct 19, 2006Galdo Deborah APet waste cleanup kit
WO1993014006A1 *Dec 21, 1992Jul 22, 1993Merit Medical Systems, Inc.System and method for packaging coils of tubing
Classifications
U.S. Classification221/63, 206/391, 206/394
International ClassificationB65D5/42
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/4204
European ClassificationB65D5/42B