Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1721714 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1929
Filing dateSep 26, 1927
Priority dateSep 26, 1927
Publication numberUS 1721714 A, US 1721714A, US-A-1721714, US1721714 A, US1721714A
InventorsBenjamin Ross
Original AssigneeBenjamin Ross
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heel cushion for shoes
US 1721714 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 23, 1929. B. ROSS HEEL CUSHION FOR SHOES Filed Sept. 26; -192v INVENTOR Belg 4mm A 0.

4 jaw ATTORNEY Patented July 23, 1929.

UNITED STATES BENJAMIN ROSS, 0F BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

HEEL CUSHION FOR SHOES.

Substitute for application Serial No. 714,189, filed May 17, 1924. This application filed September 26,

This is a substitute application replacing my former application Ser. No. 714,189 filed May 17, 1924.

The object of the present invention is to provide a heel cushion for the interior of shoes, of such form as to afford a yielding support from the heel of the wearer and to have a positive movement when depressed to simultaneously grip the interior wall of the shoe and the heel of the wearer so as to prevent any relative movement between the shoe and the foot at the heel portion thereof.

The invention will be understood by reference to the accompanying drawings in which Figure 1 is cross section through the heel portion of a shoe with an embodiment of the invention therein and illustrating in dotted lines the action of the device;

Figure 2 is a plan View of my heel cushion, and

Figure 3 is a longitudinal section through the same.

By reference to the drawings it will be seen that A represents the heel portion of a shoe, B the heel, and C the lower wall of the heel seat of the Resting on said inner w; it is my improved heel cushion E.

By reference to Figures 1 and 3, it will be seen that my heel cushion is formed with the upper concave face 1 and the lower convex concave face 2, the wall or web between these faces being preferably of the least thickness or depth in the centre and gradually increasing in thickness toward the side and rear margins of the cushion. The margins of the cushion are bevelled for the purpose hereinafter set forth. The cushion consists of a unitary structure preferably of rubber, cork or other resilient composition.

In Figure 1, I have indicated by the dotted line the approximate position of the heel of the wearer when its pressure is thrown upon the shoe and hence upon the heel cushion. It will be noted that in this position of the heel the intermediate or centre wall or web of the cushion has been depressed until it rests upon the heel seat C. In this movement of the cushion the base members 6 are forced outwardly and the upper margins are carried inwardly toward the foot, so that the cushion at its base grips the shoe and atits upper marginal area grips the footof the wearer. In other words, depression of the web interme- Serial No. 221,895.

diate the two concavities causes the upwardly flaring margins to move toward each other and grip the heel, and the lower margins to spread outwardly and grip the inner wall of the shoe. By again referring to Fig. 1, it will be noted that in its normal position, there is a void or space between the outside body portion of the cushion and the wall of the shoe proper. Under ordinary conditions, without the cushion, the heel may move or rock slightly and particularly when the shoe begins to wear and there is a certain freedom of movement permitted. On the other hand, by employing the cushion, the space or void is occupied by the outside thickened portion of the cushion and due to the resiliency of the material, the upper thin edges grip the sides of the heel proper and thus prevents the shifting or rocking movement above referred to. It will also be noted that the marginal edges of the cushion are in a plane above the central wall or web portion both in its normal and depressed position as shown in dotted lines by said figures.

Having described my invention what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is as follows:

1. A heel cushion of substantially thin resilient material adapted to be positioned within the body of a shoe, said cushion having an upper concaved face and a centrally disposed concavity in its lower face, with an upwardly flaring margin, the top portion of said margin being movable toward the center of the heel upon depression of the cushion.

2-. A heel cushion of substantially thin resilient material adapted to be positioned within the body of a shoe, said cushion having'an upper concaved face and a central concavity in its lower face forming a thin connecting web, said cushion having an upwardly flaring margin, the top portion of said margin being movable toward the center of said heel upon depression of the web.

3. A heel cushion of substantially thin resilient material adapted to be removably positioned within the body of a shoe, said cushion having an upper concave face and a central concavity in its lower face forming a thin connecting web, said cushion having a curved flaring margin, the top portion of said margin being movable inwardly and the bottom margin outwardly upon depression of the web.

4. A heel cushion of substantially thin resilient material adapted to be positioned Within the body of a shoe, said cushion having an upper concave face and a central con- 5 cavity in its lower face forming a thin web,

said cushion having an upwardly curved flaring margin, the thickness of said cushion increasing from its center toward the margin and the top portion of said margin being movable inwardly toward the center of the 10 heel upon depression of the Web.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

BENJAMIN ROSS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2721402 *Dec 16, 1954Oct 25, 1955Marison John AHeel seat insert
US4168585 *Apr 10, 1978Sep 25, 1979Gleichner Eleanor RHeel cushion
US5015427 *Feb 21, 1989May 14, 1991Happi, Inc.Process for making an orthotic footwear insert
US5722186 *Sep 16, 1996Mar 3, 1998Northwest Podiatric Laboratory, Inc.Orthotic insert having adjustable angular orientation
US5970628 *Sep 8, 1998Oct 26, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6604300Dec 4, 2001Aug 12, 2003Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6662471Oct 18, 1999Dec 16, 2003Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6962009Jun 30, 2004Nov 8, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Bottom surface configuration for athletic shoe
US6966129Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Cushioning for athletic shoe
US6966130Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Plate for athletic shoe
US6968635Jun 30, 2004Nov 29, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe bottom
US6996923Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbing athletic shoe
US6996924Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Rear sole structure for athletic shoe
US7040040Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Midsole for athletic shoe
US7040041Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with plate
US7043857Jun 30, 2004May 16, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe having cushioning
US7069671Jun 30, 2004Jul 4, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Arch bridge for athletic shoe
US7076892Jun 30, 2004Jul 18, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbent athletic shoe
US7082700Aug 3, 2005Aug 1, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration
US7089689Aug 3, 2005Aug 15, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration and non-ground-engaging member
US7114269May 28, 2003Oct 3, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US7127835Dec 11, 2003Oct 31, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US7155843Aug 3, 2005Jan 2, 2007Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7380350Jun 30, 2004Jun 3, 2008Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with bottom opening
US7536809Dec 28, 2006May 26, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7540099Jun 30, 2004Jun 2, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Heel support for athletic shoe
US7596888Dec 12, 2008Oct 6, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Shoe with flexible plate
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/37
International ClassificationA43B21/32, A43B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/32
European ClassificationA43B21/32