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Publication numberUS1723375 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1929
Filing dateFeb 16, 1928
Priority dateFeb 16, 1928
Publication numberUS 1723375 A, US 1723375A, US-A-1723375, US1723375 A, US1723375A
InventorsHarold Rubin
Original AssigneeHarold Rubin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dancing shoe
US 1723375 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. RUBIN DANCING 52708 Aug. 6, 1929.

Filed Feb. 16, 1928 Elwuantoz E7 0 Z6ZRZZ 1 85 flame 1 Patented Aug. 6, 1929.

PATENT. OFFICE.

AROLD 1mm, on NEW YORK, N. Y.

DANCING snon.

Application aiea'rebruar 16, 1928. Serial No. 254,656.

This invention relates to improvements in dancing shoes usually worn by actors when dancing what is known as the clog and buck and wing dance; and it has for its object to produce a pleasing and noisy sound that will lend a great deal of novelty to adancing act.

Another object of the invention is'to provide a noise producing attachment that may be readily secured to the ordlnary danolng shoe and which when in use will greatly facilitate the art of stage dancing of the eccentric type.

And to these ends the invention consists in the novel details of construction and com bination of parts more fully hereinafter described and particularly pointed out in the claims.

Referring to the drawings forming a part of this specification in which like numerals designate like parts in all the views Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a shoe showing the invention secured thereto.

Figure 2 is an enlarged bottom plan view I of the toe portion of the shoe.

Figure 3 is an. enlarged side elevational view, with a part broken away, of the toe portion of the shoe.

Figure 4 is an enlarged detailcross sectional view of a portion of the shoe attachment, and,

Figure 5 is a side elevational view of the parts shown in Figure 4.

Referring to the drawings in detail, 1 designates a shoe of the type generally used by dancers and 2 designates my improved attachment secured to the sole 8 at the toe portion.

The attachment comprises a pair of horizontally arranged steel plates 4 and 5 which are connected together at a plurality of points by a series of rivets 6. Spacing washers 7 surround the rivets between the plates, for holding the plates in proper spaced relation to each other. The upper or top plate 4 is relatively larger than the lower or bottom plate 5 and is formed from a relatively thin piece of steel and is provided, adjacent its outer edge, with a series of openings 8 through which pass aseries of nails 9 for securing the attachment to the sole 3 of the shoe.

The lower or bottom plate 5 is formed from a relatively thick piece of steel and is provided with a series of recesses or sockets 1O is in use.

for retaining a plurality of steel balls 11. r

.lhe balls are loosely mounted within the sockets so as to have a vertical movement or upward and downward play when the device, The halls are arranged to project slightly below the bottom surface of the plate 5 and during the act of dancing when the foot contacts with the floor the balls are suddenly driven upwardly into contact with the plate f 'as'shown in Figure 5, thus producing a pleasing and noisy sound.

In securing the device to a shoe an opening 12 is out in the sole to conform to the size and shape of the plate 5. The device is then secured in position and arranged so that the upper plate 4 will be secured to the shoe between the outer sole 3 and the inner sole 13. as shown in Figure 3. WVhen secured in position the bottom surface of the plate 5 is flush with the bottom surface of the sole of the shoe so that a smooth and continuous surface of the plate and sole is presented.

By the provision of a ball bearing attachment of this type it is obvious that the art of s .age dancing may be somewhat facilitated and quicker and more graceful movements obtained in rendering a new and novel dancmg act.

While I have described in detail specific forms of the invention. I wish it to be under stood that various modifications and changes may be made, such as for instance, the attachmentmay be secured to the heel of the shoe if desired or to the central or any other part of the sole if desired.

What I claim is 2- 1. An attachment for dancing shoes comprising a pair of horizontally arranged plates adapted to be secured to the sole of the shoe and a plurality of sound producing elements loosely mounted on one of the plates and adapted to strike the other of said plates when the shoe is used in dancing.

2. An attachment for dancing shoes comprising a pair of horizontally arranged plates secured to each other in spaced relation and a plurality of sound producing ele ments loosely mounted in the lower plate and arranged to strike the upper plate when the shoe is used in dancing.

3. An attachment for dancing shoes comprising a pair of horizontally I arranged plates secured to each other in spaced relation, the lower of said plates being provided with a series of recesses and a series of sound producing elements loosely mounted in the recesses and arranged to strike the upper plate when the shoe is used in dancing.

4. An attachment for dancing shoes comprising a pair of horizontally "arranged plates secured to each other in spaced relation, the lower of said plates provided with a series of recesses, and balls loosely mounted in the recesses and projecting below the bottom surface of the lower plate, said balls being arranged to strike the upper plate when the shoe is used in dancing.

5. In a dancing shoe having its sole provided with an opening, a pair of horizontally arranged plates secured to the shoe Within the opening, and a plurality of sound producing elements loosely mounted in one of the plates and adapted to strike the other of said plates when the shoe is used in danc- 6. In a dancing shoe having its sole provided with an opening, a pair of horizontally arranged plates secured to the shoe within the opening, and a plurality of balls ,loosely mounted in the lower of said plates and adapted to strike the upper of said plates when the shoe is used in dancing.

7. In a dancing shoe having its sole provided with an opening, a pair of horizontally arranged plates connected to each other in spaced relation and secured to the shoe within the opening, and balls loosely 1nount ed in the lower of said plates and having a portion projecting below the bottom surface of the plate, said balls being arranged to strike the upper plate when the shoe is used in dancing.

In testimony whereof I have hereto aflixed my signature on this 14th day of February,

- HAROLD RUBIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2789375 *Jul 8, 1955Apr 23, 1957Westing Process CoHeel protector for shoes
US3007260 *Aug 8, 1960Nov 7, 1961Stone Lowell GDance taps
US4691453 *Sep 8, 1986Sep 8, 1987Salustiano TifreFor recreation activities
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/8.3, 36/113
International ClassificationA43B5/12, A43B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/12
European ClassificationA43B5/12