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Publication numberUS1723912 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1929
Filing dateFeb 15, 1928
Priority dateFeb 15, 1928
Publication numberUS 1723912 A, US 1723912A, US-A-1723912, US1723912 A, US1723912A
InventorsBergman Sven R
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dynamo-electric machine
US 1723912 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

DYNAMO ELECTRIC MACHINE Filed Feb. 15, 1928 Inventor Sven $5.581 mam, A7 y H i s Attcrn eyt Patented Aug. 6, 1929.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

SVEN R. BERGMAN, 0F NAHANT, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO GENERAL ELEC- TRIC COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

DYNAMIC-ELECTRIC MACHINE.

Application filed February 15, 1928.

My. invention relates to dynamo electric machines and has for its object a novel construction of the stationary member of such a machine, whereby the magnetic material of the member is used to better advantage than was heretofore possible, and further more the member may be made out of punchings without any waste.

The various features of novelty which characterize my invention are pointed out with )articularity in the claims annexed to and orming a part of this specification. For a better understanding of my invention, reference may be had to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a view of a dynamo electric machine embodying my invention, and Fig. 2 is a diagram of connections.

Although my invention is applicable to dynamo electric machines generally, it is particularly applicable to single phase alternating current motors and I have shown it applied to a single phase repulsion motor in the accompanying drawing. The stationary member of the motor illustrated comprises square laminations 1 having slots 2, 3, 4 and 5 in the inner periphery thereof. The slots 2 at the corners of the laminations are much deeper than those opposite the sides of the laminations. A winding 6 is non: uniformly distributed and substantially fills all the slots, the number of turns of the winding per slot varying approximately sinusoidally around the periphery. The purpose of this, is to obtain a sine-wave shape of flux for each pole. The slots opposite each side of the square form one pole, when my arrangement is used in a 4-pole motor, and the axes of the slots forming such a pole are substantially parallel.

The rotatable member 7 may be of any well known construction. In Fi"; 2 of the drawing, I have shown one form of circuit arrangement of the windings. The circuit arrangement is that of a single phase repulsion motor. The winding 6 of the stationary 'member is connected to a source of single phase alternating current, the windings of all the poles being connected in series. The winding 8 of the rotatable member is connected to a commutator on which brushes 9 bear. The brushes of opposite polarity are connected together so as to short-circuit the winding 8.

Serial No. 254,566.

In order to obtain an'approximately sinusoidal shape of flux for each pole, the number of turns in the winding 6 for each pole are arranged in about the ratio of 40: 36: 26: 10: 10: 26: 36: 40. The largest number of turns are placed in slots 2 and the smallest number of turns in slots 5, the intermediate number of turns being placed in slots 3 and 4. With this arrangement of the winding, the center of the poles coincides with the center of the sides of the square. By utilizing the ordinarily wasted corners of a square punching for the large slots, the flux path back of the slots is not restricted. Since in an alternating current motor, the flux revolves, the flux density in'the stator should be the same at all points. It will be noted that with my construction the depth of the stator iron back of the slots is substantially constant and consequently the flux density in the stator is substantially contan't.

WVith this arrangement, a great saving in material is accomplished due to the fact that the whole square is punched out from a sheet without waste. By making the slots with nearly parallel axes, the slots are made convenient for machine winding, thus saving cost, and also obtaining a greater average space factor, since there will be no tendency for the winding to pile up in any portion of the slot.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a dynamo electric machine, a stationary magnetic structure comprising substantially square laminations having slots on the inner periphery thereof, said slots at the corners of said laminations being deeper than those opposite the sides of said laminations, and a winding distributed in said slots and substantially filling said slots.

2. In a dynamo electric machine, a stationary magnetic structure comprising substantiall square laminations having slots on the inner periphery thereof, said slots at the corners of said laminations being deeper than those opposite the sides of said laminations, and a winding distributed in said slots and substantially filling said slots, the number of turns of the winding in each slot varying approximately sinusoidally around the periphery of said laminations.

3. In a dynamo electric machine, a stationary magnetic structure comprising subthe slots opposite each side of the square containing the'windin'gs of a single pole.

4. In a dynamo electric machine, a stationary magnetic structurecomprising substantially square laminations having slots on the inner periphery thereof, said slots at the corners of said laminations being deeper than those opposite the sides of said laminations, and a winding distributed in said slots and substantially filling said slots, the number of turns of the winding in each slot varying approximately sinusoidally around the peri hery of said laminations, the slots opposlte each side of the square containing the windings of a single pole.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 11th day of February, 1928.

SVEN R. BERGMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2700115 *Oct 10, 1950Jan 18, 1955Walt Inc DeAir-cooled electric motor
US2792512 *Dec 30, 1953May 14, 1957Westinghouse Electric CorpElectric motor
US3154708 *Apr 25, 1963Oct 27, 1964Gen ElectricStator for use in an alternating current induction motor
US3235762 *May 2, 1962Feb 15, 1966Gen ElectricStator for use in alternating current induction motors
US3366812 *Oct 11, 1965Jan 30, 1968Skil CorpDistributed field stator for universal or d.c. motors
US3622823 *Mar 11, 1970Nov 23, 1971Nat Res DevRotary electric machines
US3942055 *Oct 16, 1974Mar 2, 1976General Electric CompanyHermetic motor stator
US5998904 *Jun 29, 1998Dec 7, 1999Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.Motor
US7911105 *Jan 10, 2008Mar 22, 2011Remy International, Inc.Stator winding having same radial positions
US8018109Sep 14, 2010Sep 13, 2011Ford Global Technologies, LlcPermanent magnet machine with offset pole spacing
US8018113 *Mar 30, 2009Sep 13, 2011Tesla Motors, Inc.AC motor winding pattern
US8044546Aug 18, 2010Oct 25, 2011Ford Global Technologies, LlcPermanent magnet machine
US8138653 *Apr 18, 2007Mar 20, 2012Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaRotating electric machine
US8350431Oct 14, 2011Jan 8, 2013Ford Global Technologies, LlcPermanent magnet machine
US8436504 *Jan 11, 2010May 7, 2013Ford Global Technologies, LlcStator for an electric machine
US8461739 *Sep 25, 2009Jun 11, 2013Ford Global Technologies, LlcStator for an electric machine
US8536748Sep 15, 2010Sep 17, 2013Ford Global Technologies, LlcPermanent magnet machine with different pole arc angles
US20100176675 *Jan 14, 2010Jul 15, 2010Nicolas LabbeElectric rotating machine, mainly for the starter of an automotive vehicle
US20110169369 *Jan 11, 2010Jul 14, 2011Ford Global Technologies, LlcStator for an electric machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification310/176, 310/202, 310/195, 310/111, 310/216.72
International ClassificationH02K1/16
Cooperative ClassificationH02K1/16
European ClassificationH02K1/16