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Publication numberUS1725494 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 20, 1929
Filing dateMar 7, 1928
Priority dateMar 7, 1928
Publication numberUS 1725494 A, US 1725494A, US-A-1725494, US1725494 A, US1725494A
InventorsVarnum Carrol F
Original AssigneeVarnum Carrol F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pool-ball rack
US 1725494 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A118- 20 1929- c. F. vARNuM 1,725,494

POOL BALL RACK Filed March 7, 1928 vE/vron c RoL f mm1/M WjL @fj ATToR/vfrs Patented Aug. 20, 1929.

UNITED STATESy CARROL F. VARNUM, OF GLENDALE, CALIFORNIA.

POOL-BALL RACK.

Application filed March 7, 1928.

This invention relates to games, and more particularly to an improved triangle or frame for properly positioning pool balls in accordance with the usual practice at the beginning of the game.

An object of the invention is the provision of an improved type of pool ball positioning frame adapted to quickly and accurately position the fifteen balls used in the game of pool, in pyramidal or triangular arrangement.

Another object is the provision of a positioning frame of the character described, in which two side members are hinged to a base member at its opposite ends, so that by positioning the side members with their free ends in contact, a triangle may be formed.

Another object is the provision of a triangle constructed as described, in which a spring is associated with each of the pivotal mountings, urgingA the side members inwards towards the base member so that when all of the fifteen balls are gathered in between the base member Aand two side members, the triangle will tend to automatically position the balls in proper pyramidal arrangement.

A further object is the provision of a hingedly-connected positioning frame, in which the side members are slightly shorter than the base member, permitting the frame to be folded compactly when out of use.

With the foregoing and other objects'in view which will be made manifest in the following detailed description and specifically pointed out in the appended claims, reference is had to the accompanying drawings for an illustrative embodiment of the invention, wherein:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of my improved pool ball positioning frame in operatiorr, showing the manner in which the ifteen pool balls are pyramided thereby.

.Fig 2 is a side elevation of the frame, the direction of view being indicated by the arrow 2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the triangle of Fig. 1, after the balls have been removed and the triangle collapsed.

In terms of broad inclusion, the pool ball rack or frame of my invention, comprises a base having a side member hinged to each end thereof, making itpossible to use the device to gather in the fteen balls ordinarily used in the game of pool, and then by bringing the free ends of the side member together, pyramiding the balls in the conventional ar.

Seriall No. 259,821.

rangement. When the balls have thus been pyramided and properly positioned upon the pool table, the side members may then be swunOr outwards on their hinged mountings, and the frame removed from the balls without disturbing them from their accurate arrangement. Another feature associated with this type of positioning frame, is the fact that the balls may be more accurately positioned in relation to each other, than with the conventional rigid type of positioning frame. The rigid type of frame is necessarily somewhat larger than the triangle described by the pyramided balls, to enable the balls to be placed therein with ease. Therefore, it is obvious that after the frame has been removed, each of the balls will not be in actual contact with all of its neighboring balls as is the case with my improved rack in which the balls are squeezed together until actual contact is made between everyone of the balls.

In its preferred embodiment, the device of the present invention comprises a base member 6 having side members 7 and 8, hinged to opposite ends thereof by the hinges 9 and 11 respectively. A coil spring 12 and 13 is incorporated with each of the hinges 9 and 11 respectively, urging the free ends 14 and 16 of the sidemembers 7 and 8 respectively, toward the opposite ends of the base member 6.

A tongue 17 is provided upon the free end 14 of the side member 7, and a complementary groove 18 is provided upon the free end 16 of the side member 8, wherein the tongue 17 may be releasably seated to retain the frame in the form of an isosceles triangle. The side members 7 and 8 are provided with handles 21 and 22 respectively, to facilitate use of the triangle.

The side members 7 and 8 are preferably of the same length and slightly shorter than the base member 6, as clearly shown in Fig. 3. The proportionate size and arrangement of parts is such that when the fifteen balls 26 ordinarily used in the game of pool, are pyramided within the frame as shown 1n Fig. 1, the free ends 14 and 16 of the side members 7 and 8 are separated a short distance. t

In using the pool ball rack of my invention, it is manipulated by grasping the handles 21 and 22 and separating the sides 7 and 8 against the action of the springs 12 and 13- The rac-k may then be used as a scoop,

by sliding it over the surface of the pool table to gather in the balls 26. Then all fifteen balls have thus been gathered in, the sides 7 and 8 should be permitted to turn upon their hinges 12 and 13 toward each other, urging the balls 26 together and collecting them in the form of a triangle or pyramid, in accordance with the rules of the game. The collected balls 26 and frame are then moved across the table to position them properly for the start of the game, after which the sides 7 and 8 may be' separated to permit removal of the frame without disturbing the accurate arrangement of the balls 26. It will be found that after being so arranged, each of the balls 26 will be in actual contact with all of its neighboring balls, which is frequently not the case when using the conventional Y type of pool ball rack which is necessarily slightly larger than the triangle described by the pyramided balls.

Various changes in the details of construction may be made without departingfrom the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A pool ball positioning frame comprising a base member and a side member hinged to each end of said base member, a spring associated with each side member urging the free end thereof toward the opposite end of the base member, said side members being of the same length and shorter than the base member, and a tongue on the free end of one of said side members adapted to be rcleasably seated within a complementary groove in the free end of the other side member to hold the frame in the form of an isosceles triangle.

2. A pool ball positioning frame comprising a base member and a side member hinged to each end of said base member, and a spring members will urge balls positioned in the fra-me against the base member thus forming a triangle of balls.

4:. A pool ball positioningframe comprisling a base member and side members hingedlyV connected to the base member, said side members being shorter than the base member whereby when a predetermined number of balls are within the frame the forward ends of the side members will be spaced from each other to facilitate properly positioning the foremost ball on a spot.

5. A pool ball positioning frame comprising a triangular frame adapted to form a plurality of balls placed therein into a triangle, said frame having an opening in its forward end extending from top to bottom thereof to facilitate properly positioning the foremost ball upon a spot.

6. A pool ball positioning frame comprising a base member, side members extending' forwardly from the base member, at least one of said side ymembers being hingedly connected to the base member so that its angular relation with respect to thebase member may be varied and spring means urging the mentioned side member toward the other side member. Y i

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.

CARROL F. VARNUM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2534770 *Jan 17, 1946Dec 19, 1950Holmes Frank GroomsBall return means for pool tables
US3992005 *Oct 22, 1975Nov 16, 1976Richey John NBilliard ball rack
US5376054 *Jun 14, 1993Dec 27, 1994Kwasny; Charles D.Multiple use billiard ball rack
US5556341 *Dec 6, 1995Sep 17, 1996Bonn, Jr.; Russell H.Billiard ball rack
US5916032 *Sep 29, 1997Jun 29, 1999Stoll; Raymond C.Combination 15-ball and 9-ball billiard ball rack
US6595862 *Apr 6, 2001Jul 22, 2003Creative InventionsBilliards ball rack
US7666105 *Mar 21, 2007Feb 23, 2010James R. PlichtaOpen sided billiard rack
US7785209Feb 24, 2006Aug 31, 2010RST2 International, LLCBilliard rack
US8496535May 24, 2011Jul 30, 2013Matthew KaplanRacking frame kit
US8574089 *Feb 12, 2013Nov 5, 2013William BovaBilliards rack system and method of use
US8911299 *Dec 3, 2012Dec 16, 2014Mark H. DayBilliard rack assembly and method of racking billiard balls
US20140256460 *Mar 7, 2013Sep 11, 2014Albert GeigesCompact Folding Billiard Rack
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/40
International ClassificationA63D15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63D15/005
European ClassificationA63D15/00R