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Publication numberUS1725661 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 20, 1929
Filing dateAug 16, 1927
Priority dateAug 16, 1927
Publication numberUS 1725661 A, US 1725661A, US-A-1725661, US1725661 A, US1725661A
InventorsMcpartland Hugh Vincent
Original AssigneeOswin C Moll
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ozonator
US 1725661 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

iug. 20, 1929. H. V. MCPARTLAND 1,725,661

ozoNAToR 'Filed Aug. 1e, 1927 INVENTOYR ATTORNEY WITNESSES atented ug. 20, 1929.

HUGH VINCENT MGPARTLAND, GF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOR 0F ONE-HALF T0 OSWIN C. MOLL, F BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

OZONATOB.

Application filed August 16, 1927. Serial No. 213,369.

The present invention is concerned with improvements in ozonators, an object of the invention being to provide an ozonator 1n which the usual air gap between electrodes is entirely eliminated, and an ozonator of extremely simple, practical construction which will be highly eficient in use, in that a maximum amount of oxygen condensing and ozone generating surface is provided in a minimum amount of space due to the use of closely arranged perforations in the electrodes which.

cause a plurality of relatively intense corona discharges, and a rapid formation of ozone.

Another object of the invention is to pro- !5 vide a unit adapted to be associated withthe air intake of a carburetor and which includes in combination'an ozonator and moistener so that air entering the carburetor is thoroughly ozonated and dampened, and peculiarly 50 suited for supporting the combustion of highly atomized or other types of fuel oil.

Other objects of the invention are to provide an ozonator which is well suited to the requirements of economical manufacture.

l5 With the above noted and other objects in view, the invention consists in certain novel features of construction and combinations and arrangements of parts, as will be more fully hereinafter set forth and pointed out in l0 the claims. The invention may be more fully understood from the following description in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein- Fig. 1 is a plan view of an ozonator embody- 5 ing the present invention with parts of the I electrode and dielectric laminations broken away for the sake of clearness.

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view on the line 2--2 of Fig. 1.

) Fig. 3 is a sectional detail on the line 3 3 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a view partly in side elevation and partly in section showing an ozonator and moistening unit adapted to be associated with the usual intake of a carburetor.

It is to be understood at the outset that the accompanying drawings are more or less dia-` grammatic, and that while'I have shown comparatively simple forms of electrodes interlaminated with dielectric sheets it may be desirable in many instances to use single electrodes comprising a great number of electrode sheets instead of simply one or two.

In the drawings I have used the reference numbers 10 and 11 to designate the electrodes.

The electrode 10 is in the nature of a single imperforate sheet of suitable conductive v material such for instance as extremely thin metal or tin foil. Itis connected as by a wire 12 to a suitable coil such as the coil 13 in Fig. 4 energized from the battery 14.

The electrode sheet 11 is disposed between a pair of relatively thin dielectric sheet-s 15 of mica or equivalent material. The electrodeI 10 includes two spaced sheets of conductive material such as tin foil, which sheets overlie the outer surfaces of the mica sheets 15 and are connected by a wire 16 to the other end of the coil 13.

The two sheets of the electrode 10 are perforated as indicated at 10%, the perforations being arranged closely together and the perforations of one sheet being staggered relatively to the other as best seen in Fig. 1.

Even without any current passing through 75 the electrodes, there will be a tendency for oxygen to condense on the outer electrode and on the exposed surfaces of the mica dielectrics. When the current is on, such condensation will of course be materially accentuated and increasedto an extent where the small corona' discharge emanating from the rim of each and every perforation and passing from one electrode to the other will cause generation of ozone. This silent electrical discharge does not have to pass through any air gap as is the case with the ozonators now employed, and the discharge occurring at all` of the perforations insures generation of ozone over a wide area.

While I have not definitely established -my theory on the point, the discharge seems to follow the law of inverse squares. That is, if the dielectric is twice as thick between the' metal plates the discharge is one-fourth as 95 strong; and three times as thick, only oneninth as strong, etc.

In Fig. 4 I have shown diagrammatically a unit for application to the air intakes of internal combustion engines, especially for 100 application to intake of the carburetors. In this view, a box contains a number of the ozonator units vabove describedl over which the incoming air is passed and in which ozoney is generated. `From the box 20 the air and 105 ozone are carried through a moistening chamber 21 andY passed over a number of wicks 22 dipping in a well 33, thence to the air intake pipe 24 of the carburetor. The moist ozonated air is of course excellent for mixture 110 with the Vatcmiz'ed gasolene or other hydro-f carbon fuel employed. .A

y The electrodes while illustrated as of' plate form, might be in the nature of various types of conductive pastes or owders, printed, painted or otherwise applied to the faces of the dielectric. Conductive wire or metal strips might also serve as electrodes, and I do not wish to limit myself-in this respect.

Various changes and alterations might be made in the general form and arrangement of the parts described without departing from the invention. Hence I do not wish to limit myself to the details set forth, but shall consider myself at liberty to make such changes and alterations as fairly fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

1. An ozonator comprising a pair of thin plate electrodes interleaved with each other and with thin sheets of dielectric material,

the outer electrode sheet having a plurality of apertures therein.

2. An oz'onator comprising a pair of thin plate electrodes interleaved with each other and with thin sheets of dielectric material, the outer electrode including a pair of sheets lying 0n opposite sides of the pack and having apertures therein.`

3. An ozonator comprising a pair of thin plate electrodes interleaved with each other and with thin sheets of dielectric material, the outer electrode includin a pair of sheets lying on opposite sides o the pack andhaving apertures therein, the apertures of one sheet being staggered relatively to the apertures of the other.

Signed at New York in the county of New York and State of New York this 15th day of August A. D. 1927.

HUGH VINCENT MGPAR'ILAND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3124525 *Mar 14, 1963Mar 10, 1964 Ozone generator
US3476095 *Jun 20, 1967Nov 4, 1969Plastus SaMethod and means for feeding internal combustion engines
US3898468 *Jul 3, 1973Aug 5, 1975Brunet GeorgesElectric device for the treatment of a gaseous fluid
US4386595 *Oct 18, 1979Jun 7, 1983Young James WAir treating device for fuel burning engines
US5487874 *Mar 30, 1994Jan 30, 1996Scientific Products CorporationAir intake system for an internal combustion engine
US6012283 *Jun 23, 1998Jan 11, 2000Lockheed Martin Corp.Method and apparatus for reducing pollutants
US6029442 *Oct 7, 1997Feb 29, 2000Litex, Inc.Method and apparatus for using free radicals to reduce pollutants in the exhaust gases from the combustion of fuel
US6048500 *Mar 6, 1998Apr 11, 2000Litex, Inc.Method and apparatus for using hydroxyl to reduce pollutants in the exhaust gases from the combustion of a fuel
US6253544Oct 7, 1999Jul 3, 2001Lockheed Martin CorporationMethod and apparatus for reducing pollutants
US6264899Mar 1, 2000Jul 24, 2001Litex, Inc.Method and apparatus for using hydroxyl to reduce pollutants in the exhaust gases from the combustion of a fuel
US6321531Feb 25, 2000Nov 27, 2001Litex, Inc.Method and apparatus for using free radicals to reduce pollutants in the exhaust gases from the combustion of a fuel
US6330794Dec 17, 1999Dec 18, 2001Litex, Inc.Method and apparatus for using free radicals to reduce pollutants in the exhaust gases from the combustion of a fuel
US6357223Feb 18, 2000Mar 19, 2002Litex, Inc.Method and apparatus for enhancing the rate and efficiency of gas phase reactions
US6990965Jul 15, 2004Jan 31, 2006Birasak VarasundharosothCombustion-engine air-intake ozone and air ion generator
US8205600Oct 22, 2010Jun 26, 2012Oxitron Technologies, LlcApparatus and system for the production of ozone for an internal combustion engine
EP1146220A1Apr 11, 2001Oct 17, 2001Masanori KondoMethod for reducing particulates emissions from a diesel engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/186.8, 123/539, 290/38.00R, 422/186.7
International ClassificationF02M25/12, C01B13/11
Cooperative ClassificationC01B2201/34, C01B2201/12, C01B13/11, F02M25/12, C01B2201/22, Y02T10/121
European ClassificationF02M25/12, C01B13/11