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Publication numberUS1726817 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1929
Filing dateJan 31, 1928
Priority dateJan 31, 1928
Publication numberUS 1726817 A, US 1726817A, US-A-1726817, US1726817 A, US1726817A
InventorsFranklin Mark B
Original AssigneeFranklin Mark B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Traffic signal
US 1726817 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 3, 1929.

M. B. FRANKLlN TRAFFIC SIGNAL Filed Jan. 51, 1928 Patented Sept. 3, 1929.

UNITED STATES MARK B. FRANKLIN, OF HOQUIAM, WASHINGTON.

TRAFFIC SIGNAL.

Application filed January 31, 1928. Serial No. 250,891.

This invention relates to traffic signals and more particularly to a sign intended to be set up at a traiiic intersection. At the present time it is customary to place signs adjacent a trailic intersection or in the middle of intersecting streets but the ones now in use have been found objectionable as they are often struck by automobiles with resulting damage to the automobile or sign.

Therefore, one object of the invention is to provide a sign having a staff formed with a yieldable portion so that if struck by an automobile the sign may be flexed and then returned to an upright position without damaging the automobile and also without danger of the sign itself being bent or broken.

Another object of the invention is to provide a spring forming the lower portion of the stali' of the improved sign with an extension adapted to lit into a recess in the wall of a mounting socket and thus prevent the sign from being turned in the socket. This will keep the sign facing in the proper direction.

Another object of the invention is to provide a protector for the spring which will prevent it from being exposed to the weather and also reinforce it and prevent distorting of the spring if the sign receives a violent blow.

The invention is illustrated in the. accompanying drawing, wherein Figure l is a view showing the improved sign partially in side elevation and partially in longitudinal section, and

' Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional view taken on the line 2 2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view in vertical section showing a modified construction.

The sign or signal constituting the subject-matter of this invention includes a head 1 which may be formed of sheet metal, wood or any other desired material and may have traffic directions painted or otherwise provid. ed upon one or both faces.

s titutes the upper portion of a staff for the 5 slgn is preferably formed of metal tubing and has its upper end split and flattened to provide upstanding arms 3 between which the head or disk 1 is placed and secured by rivets or other suitable fasteners 4. The lower end of the shank fits into the upper end portion of a coiled spring 5 constituting a lower section for the staff and this spring has its upper end passed into an opening 6 formed in the shank to securely hold the shank and spring 1n engagement with each other. While it has been stated that the shank 2 consists of a metal tube, it will be obvious that a solid bar or rod of wood or metal may be substituted with its upper end overlapping the head l and secured thereto and its lower end formed with the opening in which the upper end of the spring is engaged. In order to protect the spring from exposure to rain or snow and thereby prevent it from becoming rusted, I have provided a tubular sleeve 7 preferably formed of rubber and of such length that when applied its upper end portion will extend above the spring. It should be further noted that the upper end of the sleeve has close fitting engagement with the shank in order tovprevent rain water or melted snow and ice from flowing downwardly along the shank and onto the spring. If desired, a binding wire 8 or suitable clamp may 80 be disposed about the upper end of the sleeve to force it into tight binding engagement with the shank and prevent movement of the shank and sleeve relative to each other. The lower end of the sleeve terminates substantially iush with the lower end of the spring and is formed with a notch or recess 9 to receive a side arm 10. The side arm 10 constitutes a portion of the resilient strand from which the spring is formed and this end portion of the strand is also bent to provide an. upstanding finger 11 which extends longitudinally of the sleeve with its free end l2 bent towards the sleeve and closely contacting therewith. In order to supportthe sign or signal, I employ a socket 13 preferably formed of metal and having its upper end portion ared to provide a mouth 14 into which the sleeve may be easily passed and a collar 15 which rests flat upon the pavement and only projects upwardly therefrom the thickness of the metal from which the socket is formed. The sleeve and socket are of such dimensions that the sleeve will fit snugly into the socket and the wall of the socket is formed with a longitudinally extending` groove or recess 16 to receive the arm 10 and finger 11. This is clearly shown in the drawing and by referring to Fig. 1 it will be seen that when the sign is mounted in the socket the finger which is disposed in the recess will very effectively serve to prevent rotary motion of the staff. Therefore, there will be no danger of the sign accidentally becoming turned in the socket and assuming a position in which it may not be easily or properly read. If the sign should be accidentally struck by an automobile, the blow received will cause the spring and rubber tube 7 to be flexed and the head 1 swung downwardly. The resiliency of the spring will cause it to immediately return to an upright position. Therefore, there will be no danger of the staff being broken or '/ent and it will not be necessary to replace it with a new sign or substitute a new one while a bent staff is being straightened. The rubber tube or sleeve very effectively prevents rain water or snow from accumulating upon the spring and thus eliminate danger of rust with resulting weakening of the spring. The sleeve also serves as a yieldable reinforcement for the spring and prevents danger of its being distorted if violently struck by a rapidly traveling automobile. While the finger 11 very effectively prevents the sign from being accldentally turned out of its proper position, it does not prevent the staff' from being easily withdrawn from the socket when it is necessary to remove the sign. It should also be noted that since the upper end portion of the socket is flared there will be less danger of the sprin being bent when it strikes the walls of t e socket. Attention is also called to the fact that since the lower end of the staff is about six inches from the pavement a blow will always be received upon the staff and a back lash thereby prevented.

In Figure 3 there has been shown a modified construction. Referring to this figure it will be seen that the lower end of the lower end 17 of the staff has been tapered to a rounded point so that when the staff is struck and moved transversely'its lower end will not be liable to catch in the coils of the spring 5 and not only danger the spring but prevent the staff from returning to an upright position. It should also be noted that there has been provided an inner spring 18 which fits within the casing 5 below the staff and served to greatly strengthen the outer spring and casin and prevent them from being distorte or broken by blows received.

Having thus described the invention, I claim:

1. In a signal, a socket open at its upper end and having a recess formed in its side wall and constitutingr a seat, and an indicator including a staff having a flexible section fitted snugly into said socket and provided with a member fitted into said seat to prevent turning of the staff.

2. In a signal, a socket open at its upper end and having a seat formed in its wall, and an indicator including a staff having a coiled spring forming a portion thereof and removably fittedinto said socket, said spring having a transverse projection seated in said seat to prevent rotation of the staff.

3. In a signal, a socket open at its upper end and having a longitudinally extending recess formed in its side wall and constituting a seat, and an indicator including astaff having a flexible section fitted into said socket and having its lower end bent to form a side arm fitted into said seatto prevent rotation of the staff in the socket.

4. In-a signal, a socket open at its upper end and having a seat formed in its wall, and an indicator including a staff having a coiled spring forming a portion thereof and removably fitted into said socket, said spring having its lower end formed with a side arm bent to provide a vertically disposed portion seated in said seat and preventing rotation of the staff in the socket.

5. In a signal, a socket open at its upper end and having a seat formed in its wall, and an indicator including a staff having a. coiled spring forminga portion thereof and removably fitted into said socket, said spring having its lower end bent to provide an arm extending transversely therefrom and the arm bent to form a finger seated in said seat to prevent rotation of the staff.

6. In a signal, an indicator, a shank extending therefrom, a coiled spring connected with and extending downwardly therefrom and having its lower end bent to form a side arm, the side arm being bent upwardly to form a finger spaced from and substantially parallel to the spring, and an open-ended socket to receive said spring having its walls formed with a vertically extending groove to receive said finger and prevent rotation of the spring in the socket.

7. In a signal, an indicator, a shank depending therefrom, a coiled sprin having its upper portion secured above die lower portion of said shank, a tubular casing of flexible water proof material disposed about the spring with its upper portion extendin above the spring, and secured to the sta and an inner reinforcing coiled spring disposed within the first spring below the lower end of said staff.

8. In a signal, an indicator, a shank depending therefrom, and a coiled spring having its upper portion secured above the lower portion of said shank, the lower end of the shank being tapered to prevent it catching in the coils of the spring when the spring is flexed transversely.

9. In a signal, an indicator, and a standard consisting of a shank depending from said indicator, a coiled spring secured about the lower portion of said shank and extending downwardly therefrom, and a coiled spring l0 fitting snugly within the first spring below the lower end of said shank to reinforce the irst spring.

In testimony whereof I aix my signature.

MARK B. FRANKLIN. [L. s.]

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification40/608, 404/10, 116/63.00R, 248/160
International ClassificationE01F9/011, E01F9/017
Cooperative ClassificationE01F9/017
European ClassificationE01F9/017