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Publication numberUS1727922 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1929
Filing dateJul 19, 1927
Priority dateJul 19, 1927
Publication numberUS 1727922 A, US 1727922A, US-A-1727922, US1727922 A, US1727922A
InventorsAdams Thomas O
Original AssigneeWise Mcclung Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Casing for vacuum cleaners
US 1727922 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 10, 1929. O ADAMS 1,727,922

CASING FOR VACUUM CLEANERS Filed July 19, 1927 5 Sheets-Sheet l gmmto'a 7770172021 QAr/amw P 1929- T. o. ADAMS 1,727,922

CASING FOR VACUUM CLEANERS Filed July 19, 1927 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Sept. 10, 1929. ADAMS CASING FOR VACUUM CLEANERS Filed July 19, 1927 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Spt. 10, 1929. Q ADAMS 1,727,922

CASING FOR VACUUM CLEANERS Filed July 19, 1927 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 gwuemtoz Sept 10, 1929- T, QADAMg 3 727322 CASING FOR VACUUM CLEANERS Filed July 19, 1927 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 the two halves of the casing separated;

Patented Sept. 10, 1929.

UNITED STATES PATENT oFFI THOMAS O. ADAMS, OF NEW PHILADELPHIA, OHIO, ASSIGNOR, BY MESNE ASSIGN- MENTS, TO WISE-MGOLUNG CORPORATIO PORATION OF OHIO.

Application filed Jul 19.

The invention relates to casings for vacuum cleaners; and the object of the improvement is to. provide a casing formed of two sections adapted to be connected together by screws or the like and forming a complete mbtor housing, fan chamber andnozzle, separable along the median line of the motor and fan. 1

By forming the casing in this manner the operation of construction is greatly simplified and machine work is reduced to a minimum, while the motor, fan and bearings may be removed as a unit and the slight machine Work required for receiving the motor in the casing may be completed in a single operation, thus accurately" aligning the bearings and field of the motor.

' An embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a side elevationof a sweeper provided with the improved casing, showing 7 Fig. 2, a front elevation of the improved casing;

' Fig. 3, a plan view of the lower half .of the casing; 1 Fig. 4, an elevation of the motor assembled;

Fig. 5, a plan view of the lower half of the casing, showing the motor and fan assembledtherein;. p 7

Fig. 6, a bottom plan view of the upper half of the casing;'

Fi 7, a transverse section through the nozz e;

Fig. 8, an enlarged fragmentary transverse section through the fan chamber;

Fig. 9, a detail sectional view of the rear caster mounting; and Fig. 10, a detached elevation of the cover plate for the attachment opening.

Similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the drawings.

The casing is formed of the upper and lower sections indicated generally at 1 and 2 respectively which may be in the form of die castings. Each section forms substan-' tially one-half of the entire vacuum cleaner casing and the sections are adapted, when 1v, or NEW PHILADELPHIA, OHIO, A core CASING FOR VACUUM CLEANERS.

1927. Serial No. 206,861.

at 3, being substantially semi-cylindrical and terminating in the semi-spherical outer end 4, having the tubular supports 5 for the motor brushes 6.

A rearwardly disposed lug 7 is formed upon the lower half of the motor housing for the attachment of the mat caster 8. Halfround bearing sockets 9 and 10 are formed in the ends of the lower half of the motor housing 3, for the reception of the motor bearings 11 and 12 respectively, half-round ribs 13 are-provided therein for the reception of the field 14 of the motor.

The lower half of the fan chamber, as indicated at 15, is formed integral with and at the forward end of the lower half of the mo-fio tor housing 3, being separated therefrom by the partition wall 15. This half of the fan -cha1nberis of the propersize and shape to ber for the purpose of attaching the axle 18 of the'front casters 19.

Thelower portion 20 of the nozzle extends 30 downward and forward from the front side of the lower half of the fan chamber, being flared outward from the inlet opening 21 thereof.

An upright flange 22 is formed integral with each side edge of the lower portion- 20 of the nozzle.

After the lower section 2 is" formed, the only machine work, necessary thereon is a single milloperation upon. the ribs 13 and bearing sockets 9 and 10, which thus accurately aligns these ribs and sockets to re ceiVe 'the field 14 and bearings 11 and 12 of the .motor. w

Apertures 27, 28 and 29 are formed in the 9 I lower halves of the motor housing, fan cham her and nozzle respectively to receive screws. to connect the upper section 1 thereto. Apertures 30 are also provided adjacent to the bearing sockets 9 and 10 to receivescrews and spaced 65 31 for attaching the clips 32 by means of which the bearings 11 and 12 are held in place within the bearing sockets.

Apertures 33 are formed in the inwardly disposed lugs 34 to receive the screws 35', the heads of which are received in the recesses 36 of the motor field to retain the same in position; and apertures are provided in the brush supports 5 to receive the screws 37 for retaining the brushes therein.

As the entire motor, tan and bearings are assembled in a single unit, it will be seen that when the lower section is formed and machined as above described, this unit may be easily and accurately mounted in position therein and attached by means of the screws 31 and 35, and clips 32.

The lower half of the casing thus has the motor, fan, bearings, and casters all assembled thereon independently of the upper section 1 which forms a cover for these parts.

This upper section comprises the upper half 38 of the motor housing, the upper half 39 of the fan chamber, and the upper portion 40 of the nozzle.

The upper portion of the motor housing has the half-round sockets 41 and 42 to accommodate the motor bearings ,11 and 12 ,respectively, and the half-round sockets 43 to accommodate the brush supports 5, and is provided upon its top with lugs 44 for the attachment of the usual operating handle 45, by means of which the cleaner may lpe moved to and fro upon the objective surace.

The upper and lower halves of the fan chamber are provided around their edges with the cooperating interfitting ribs 46 and 47 respectively, adapted to overlap and form a tight joint when the sections are connected together. Grease or the like may be placed between these ribs and when the two halves of the fan chamber are drawn together by the screws an air-tight chamber is formed.

An outlet compartment 48 is formed integral with the upper half of the fan chamber and adapted to communicate with the-elongated side 49 of the lower half 15 of the fan chamber.

The outlet neck 50 communicates with the outlet compartment 48, and may be provided with the studs 51, for the attachment of the usual dust collector bag 52, the upper end of which bag may be supported from the handle 45 of the. sweeper in the usual manner.

The upper portion 40 of'the nozzle depends downward and forward from the front of the upper half 39 of the tan chamber and communicates therewith through the half-roundopening 53. The inclined sideedges of this upper portion of the nozzle are provided with the depending, slightly inclined flanges 54 adapted to overlap the upright flanges 22 uponthe lower portion of the nozzle.

The depending flanges 55 are also provided at the ends of the upper portion 40 of the nozzle, forming a closure for the ends of the nozzle mouth, and the depending flange 56 "is formed at the forward edge thereof,

forming the forward lip of the nozzle mouth.

An opening 57 may be formed in the upper portion 40 of the nozzle, adjacent to the inlet opening to the fan chamber, for the insertion of the usual converter hose by means of which the sweeper attachments may be used. This opening may be normally closed by a hinged plate 58.

Tapped apertures 59, 60 and 61 are provided in the upper portions of the motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle respectively for the reception of the screws which are inserted through the apertures 27, 28 and 29 of the lower section for the purpose of connecting the two sections together to form a complete vacuum cleaner casing.

The brush 63 is carried by a pair of arms 64, pivotally mounted, as at 65, upon the inner sides of the end walls 55 of the upper portion 40 of the nozzle. The free ends of these arms may be curved, as shown at 66, for frictional engagement with the rubber bumper 67 upon the forward flange 56. When it is not desired to use the brush, the same may be swung backward, upon its piv ots, in rear of the nozzle mouth.

The rear caster 69 is journalled in the yoke 7 O, which is swivelled upon the lower end of the adjusting screw 71. This screw is threaded through a fixed nut 72, which may have a ilrivp fit in the aperture 73 formed in the The lower end of this nut is internally coned as at 74, to receive the split, conical bushing 75, which is retained as by the spring clip 76, having the inturned flange ends 77, received in the grooves 78 of the lug. A knob 79 may be provided upon the top of the adjusting screw for operating the same.

WVith this construction it is not only possible to produce a casing which is comparatively cheap to manufacture and easy to assemble, but it will be seen that with very little machine work the motor, fan and bearing unit maybe accommodated and accurately aligned; the upper half of the casing may be easily and readily removed, carrying with it the dust collector bag, handle, and brush, and giving access to the motor and tan; and the motor, fan and bearings as a unit may be easily and readily removed and replaced.

I claim:

1. A vacuum cleaner casing comprising a motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle, said casing beingformed of two separable sec tions, each forming complementary portions of the motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle.

"2. A vacuum cleaner casing comprising a motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle, said casing being formed of two separable sections, each forming complementary portions of the motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle, there being interfitting ribs around the meeting edges of the fan chamber portions of the sections.

3. In a vacuum cleaner, a casing comprising' a motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle, said casing being formed of two separable upper and lower sections, each forming complementary portions of the motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle, and a motor, fan and bearing unit carried by the lower section.

4. A vacuum cleaner casing comprising a motor housing, :tan chamber and nozzle, said casing being formed of two separable upper and lower sections, each forming complementary portions of the motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle, and aligned half-annular ribs and bearing sockets in the lower section to receive the field and bearings of a motor.

5. A vacuum cleaner casing comprising a motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle, said casing being formed of two separable upper and lower sections, each forming complementary portions of the motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle, the lower section having supports for motor brushes, and aligned halfannular ribs and bearing sockets to receive the field and bearings of a motor.

6. A vacuum cleaner casing comprising a motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle, said casing being formed of two separable upper and lower sections, each forming complementary portions of the motor housing, fan chamber and nozzle, and depending flanges upon the nozzle portion of the upper section overlapping the edges of the nozzle portion of the lower section.

In testimony-that I claim the above, l have hereunto subscribed my name.

THOMAS O. ADAMS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2540763 *Sep 29, 1945Feb 6, 1951Knapp Monarch CoVacuum cleaner casing construction
US2633597 *Nov 5, 1947Apr 7, 1953Singer Mfg CoVacuum cleaner with motor and handle mounted on trunnions
US2702395 *Nov 22, 1949Feb 22, 1955Zaiger LouisPortable scouring and polishing machine of the rotary disk type
US2910721 *Dec 5, 1956Nov 3, 1959Burrage & Boyde LtdNon-electric vacuum cleaning machines
US2960713 *Sep 23, 1957Nov 22, 1960Brown & BigelowAutomobile vacuum cleaner
US3142083 *Aug 8, 1963Jul 28, 1964Singer CoVacuum cleaner
US5129128 *Jun 25, 1991Jul 14, 1992Trc Acquisition CorporationVacuum cleaner
US5218736 *Apr 21, 1992Jun 15, 1993Trc Acquisition CorporationVacuum cleaner
US8227948 *Jan 8, 2010Jul 24, 2012Hydro-Gear Limited PartnershipElectric motor
US8528166Apr 30, 2010Sep 10, 2013Techtronic Floor Care Technology LimitedUpright vacuum with floating head
US8575800Jul 20, 2012Nov 5, 2013Hydro-Gear Limited PartnershipElectric motor
US8839485Aug 30, 2013Sep 23, 2014Techtronic Floor Care Technology LimitedUpright vacuum with floating head
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/412, 310/66, 417/423.2, 15/354, 310/89, 310/216.127
International ClassificationA47L5/22, A47L5/32
Cooperative ClassificationA47L5/32
European ClassificationA47L5/32