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Publication numberUS1728199 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1929
Filing dateMay 19, 1927
Priority dateMay 19, 1927
Publication numberUS 1728199 A, US 1728199A, US-A-1728199, US1728199 A, US1728199A
InventorsEberhart Abel O
Original AssigneeEberhart Abel O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dental bite method
US 1728199 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. o. EBE RHART 1,728,199 DENTAL BITE METHOD Filed May 19, 192'?v ATTORNEYS a m a A Sept. 17, 1929.

Patented Sept. 17, 1929 warren srares ABEL O. EBERHAIRT, F ATLANTA, GEORGIA DENTAL BITE METHOD Application filed May 19,

This invention relates to dentistry and has particular reference to an improved dental bite method employed in the construction of artificial dentures.

3 At present the two principal methods of obtaining dental'bites which are in general use, are known as biscuit bite and the base plate bite, the former consisting in using a large piece of wax warmed to a soft consistency and placed in the mouth, the patient then closing the jaws to a distance approximately that re quired for the artificial teeth. This method while capable of rapid accomplishment, is very inaccurate and largely guesswork in view of the fact that the wax model is easily distorted during its removal from the mouth. In the latter method (the base plate bite) considerably more accurate results are obtained than in the former method, but the said latter method entails considerably more time and a greater degree of skill, for the reason that after the impressions have been obtained, models are made of each aw. The wax is attached to the models, trimmed to the approximately correct distance between the jaws, then placed in the patients mouth at this stage, removed and trimmed until the wax holds the jaws the correct distance apart and until proper restoration of the facial contour T i is obtained. The two wax models are then secured together in the mouth by means of a hot spatula, wire staples, or marked and secured after their removal. It is obvious that these steps require a considerable length of 753 time in addition to a high degree of skill. and the necessity of making models of both jaws.

The present invention comprehends an improved dental bite method which accomplishes results equally as well if not better than the second method above referred to, namely, the base plate bite, and this more expeditiously than said method and without entailing the high degree of skill and care required thereby, while insuring an even or uniform impression of both gums. A

With the above recited and other objects in view, reference is bad to the following description and accompanying drawings in S which the method is set forth, while the ap- 1927. Serial No. 192,628.

pended claims define the actual scope of the invention.

In the drawings Figure l is a plan view'of one of the wax bite formsemployed;

Fig. 2 is a sectional View through a 'receptacle filled with a heated liquid and il lustrating the wax bites in the liquid, which discloses an important step in the method;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of one of the wax bite forms.

In carrying the invention into practice, the method consists in employing two or more arcuate or horseshoe-shaped pieces of wax or other equivalent material, known as bite forms, the number employed depending upon the distance indicated and decided upon by previous alveolar absorption, length of the lips, and length of the teeth required. The

method further consists in the step of trimming the outer surfaces of said forms to correspond to the size andcurves of the patients jaws; securing said pieces or forms together in I superimposed relation by any known means, and placing the same in water or any equivalent liquid which is heated to approximately a temperature ot120 F., so that the same may float partially submerged. The forms thus connected are placed in the water or liquid with the piece or form which is to receive the impression of the upper jaw disposed toward the bottom and with the piece which is to receive the lower aw impression disposed toward the top. The reason for this is that the lower jaw being much sharper as a rule than the upper jaw, should have the hard side of the wax to bite into,.where as the upper jaw which has the broader reach and from which it is hard to obtain the impression has the softer side or form to bite into, It follows that the lower portion and side edges of the wax bite forms will be subjected to the greater degree of heat when floated in the heated liquid and will be softer than the upper portion. The bite forms remain in the water for approximately two minutes, during which time the outer surface will become softened while the core or central portion will remain relatively harder and less afiected by the heat, thereby enabling the operator to remove the bite forms from the mouth without warping, and permitting the said forms to remain firm while the operator adapts the softened surfaces to the ridges; removes the same from the mouth if necessary for trimming off any excess or flash, and replaces in the mouth as often as desired;

In the drawings A designates one of the bite forms which is composed of wax or an equivalent material of substantially horseshoe or arcuate shaped configuration. As previously stated, after the selection of two or more bite forms, the same are trimmed on the outer surfaces to correspond approxi mately'to-the size and curves of the patients jaws. The said forms designated at A and A in Fig. 2 are then secured together in any desired manner in superimposed relation and placed or floated in the water N of areceptacle R, with the bite form A which is to be used for thelowerjaw disposed uppermost and with the bite'form A? which is to be used for the upper jaw disposed lowermost. The bite forms are permitted for a period of appr Ximately two minutes to remainin the water or other liquid VI which has been previously brought to a temperature of approximately 120 F. Itis obvious that this specific arrangement of the bite forms in the water permits theupper jaw bite A to become softer than the lower jaw bite A which is disposed uppermost. It is also obvious that the outer surfaces of the bite forms will become softer than theinside or core, which due to the fact that the heat in the length of time specified will not have an opportunity to penetrate the central portion or core, will permit the operator to handle the same without distortion or warping while placing, removing and replacing the forms in the mouth.

What is claimed is:

1. A method of obtaining a dental bite including. the step of floating a plurality of connected superimposed bite forms in a heated liquid, whereby the lower form will be heated to greater degree than the upper form.

2. A method of obtaining a dental bite, including thestep of floating partially submerged, a plurality of connected superimposed bite forms in a heated. liquid until one form becomes softenedto a greater degree than the other form,with the inside or core portion'of each form remaining hard.

3. -A method of obtaining a dental bite, including the steps offloat-ing partially submerged, a plurality of connected superimposed bite forms in av heated liquid until the side edges and lower portions become softened to a greater degree than the upper portion with the inside or core portionremairn ing hard, and then employing the lowermost bite form for the upper jaw impression and the uppermost bite form for the lower jaw impression.

4. A method of obtaining a dental bite, consisting in trimming the outer surface of a plurality of bite forms to correspond respectively to the size and curvature of the patients upper and lower aws, connecting said trimmed bite forms in superposed relation, floating partially submerged superimposed connected bite forms in a heated liquid with the lowermost jaw forms disposed upwardly, removing the bite forms from the liquid when the side edges and lowermost portionhave become softened to a greater degree than the uppermost portion and with the core or interior remaining hard.

5. A method of obtaining a. dental bite, consisting in trimming the outer surface of a plurality of bite forms to correspond respectively to the size and curvature of the patients upper and lowerjaws, connecting said trimmed bite forms in superposed relation, floating partially submerged superimposed connected bite forms in a heated liquid with the lowermost jaw forms disposed upwardly, removing the bite forms from the liquid when the side edges and lowermost portion have become softened to a greater degree than the uppermost portion and with the core or interior remaining hard, then inserting the bite forms in the mouth, adapting the softened surfaces to the ridges, and removing the same.

ABEL o. EBERHART.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2564182 *May 10, 1950Aug 14, 1951Leonard Wade WilliamDental bite block
US5266031 *Sep 16, 1992Nov 30, 1993Marigza Rupert MMethod and device for determining tentative maxillo-mandibular centric occlusion
US8414293Jun 28, 2005Apr 9, 2013Colgate-Palmolive CompanyCarrier strip for application to oral surfaces and related methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification433/214
International ClassificationA61C9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61C9/00
European ClassificationA61C9/00