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Publication numberUS1730410 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 8, 1929
Filing dateJan 10, 1927
Priority dateJan 10, 1927
Publication numberUS 1730410 A, US 1730410A, US-A-1730410, US1730410 A, US1730410A
InventorsDennison Robert L
Original AssigneeDennison Robert L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carburetor
US 1730410 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 8, 1929. R. DENNlsoN CARBURETOR Filed Jan. l0. 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet All l \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\iii\\` Cet. 8, 1929. R. DENNlso CARBURETOR 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet Filed Jan. 10

Patented Oct. 8, 1929 UNETE STATES ROBERT L. DENNIsoII, oF'xANsAs CITY, MISSOURI CARBURETOR Application led January^10, 1927. Serial No. 160,271.

This invention relates to carburetors.

An important object of the invention, broadly speaking, is to provide a carburetor which is adapted to i'orm a homdgeneous explosive mixture whereby a high degree of efficiency is provided.

A'further object is to provide a carbilretor having means for impelliug the explosive mixture intothe engine cylinders to satisfy the full volumetric requirements of the cylinders at all engine speeds.

A 'further object is to provide a carburetor whereinvthe mixture is highly agitated to i provide a homogeneous mixture and wherein the explosive charges are impelled into the engine cylinders thus eliminating the necessity for hot spots and the like whereby explosive charges ot' the most efficient temperatures maybe injected into the cylinders to increase the eiiiciency of the explosive mixture. A further object is to provide a carburetor having power driven impelling means for pumping the explosive mixture into thev engine cylinders, the impelling means also serving the purpose of highly agitating the `mixture, and to provide means for introducing the liquid fuel into the carburetor at a point adjacent the impelling means.

A further object is to provide impelling means including a plurality of oppositely rotating propellers having bla-des pitched in opposite directions whereby all the propellers are adapted to exert. a pumping action on the explosive mixture in the same direction to force it into the engine cylinders, and wherein the opposite rotation of the propellers is `adapted to impart opposite swirling movements to the explosive mixture to effect agitation thereof to provide a highly homogeneous mixture.

A further object is to provide a carburetor of the character just mentioned employing a pair of oppositely rotating propellers, and to provide stationary means between the propellers for stopping the swirlingr action of the mixture before it reaches the second pro# peller.

A further object lis to provide novel means for supplying the fuel to a point adjacent the impelling means and to atomize the fuel as it is discharged adjacent the impelling means.

Other objectsand ad vautages of the invention will be apparent during the course of the following description In the drawings, I have shown one embodiment of the invention. In this showing,

Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view through the carburetor,

liigure 2 is an enlarged sectional view of a portion of the fuel feeding, apparatus,

Figure il is a detail Section on line 3-3 of Figure 1,

Figure l is a similar view on line 4 4 of Figure l,

Figure 5 is an enlarged sectional View on o5 line 5*.5 o l Figure 1,

Figure (3 is an enlarged sectional view on line (SEG of Figure 1,

Figure 7 is an enlarged sectional View on line 7 7 of Figure 1, and

.lfigure 8 is a detail perspective of the fuel valves and associated elements.

Referring to the drawings the numeral 10 ydesignates the body of the carburetor as a ,wholelncludmg a preferably vertical mixing conduit or chamber 11 and a substantially horizontal air inlet conduit 12 communicating with the lower end ol the mixing chamber as shown. The body of the carburetor is pre1'- erably curved at the point whe-re the air conduit connects with the mixing chamber as indicated at 13. The upper portion of the mixing chamber is preferably formed as a cap 14 connected to the body of the carburetor by bolts 15 passing through flanges 16. The e cap 14 is provided with an outlet pipe 17 which may be provided with a suitable flange 18 by means of' which it may be connected to the intake manifold. y

rlhe lower portion of the carburetor is proau vided with a preferably integral gear casing 19 arranged in axial alinement with the mixing chamber.` Thel gear casing is Closed at. its lower end byl a cap 20 bolted or otherwise secured thereto as at 21. A bearing 22 is car- L5 ried by the gear casing and rotatably sup-` ports a shaft 23 having a gear or pinion 24 or similar driving means secured to its outer end. The pinion 24 may be driven from any suitable part of the vehicle engine as will be 1w apparent. Within the gear casing, the shaft 23 is provided with a bevel gear 25 meshing with upper and lower bevel gears 26 and 27 respectively.

The gear 26 is keyed or otherwise secured to a vertical sleeve 28 which is rotatable in a bearing 29 preferably formed integral with the body of the carburetor. The upper end of the sleeve ,28 is provided with a suitable impeller 30 preferably in the form of a screw propeller, as illustrated in Figures 1, and 3,'

and in practiceI prefer to. employ a six bladed propeller as shown. The bevelgear 27 is keyed or otherwisesecured to a shaft 31. the lower end of which is journaled in a bearing 32 formed inthe cap 20. The shaft 31 extends upwardly a substantial distance beyond the upper end of the sleeve 28 and is rotatable therein, as will be apparent. An impeller 33 is secured to the upper end of the shaft 31 and is spaced a slight distance from the impeller 30. As shown in Figure 1, the .blades of the impellers 30 and 33 are oppositely pitched, and since the gears 26 and 27 are driven from opposite sides of the gear 25, it will be apparent that the impellers will be driven in opposite directions. The opposite rotation of the impellers, and the opposite pitching of the blades thereof, causes the explosive mixture to be referred to, to be driven upwardly by both impellers to be discharged through the pipe 17 into the intake manifold.

While the impellers both are adapted to pump the explosive mixture to the engine,

. it will be apparent that a considerable swirling action also will be imparted to the mixture, and this swirling action will be imparted in opposite directions by the impellers due to the opposite rotation thereof. As shown in Figures 1 and 4, means are provided for straightening out the flow of the explosive mixture between the point where it is discharged by` the impeller 30 and the point where it is picked up. by the impeller 33W For this purpose a grating 34 is arranged between the impellers and is secured to the body of the carburetor. This grating preferably includes a circular ring 35 which fits snugly within the mixing chamber, arid further includes a plurality of preferably integral crossed blades 36. Thefgrating 34 is of substantial depth so as to effectively -overcome the swirling action imparted to the explosive mixture by the impeller 30.

leferring to Figures 1, 2 and`7, the numeral 37 indicates fuel feeding valve means as a whole. This means includes a`substantially vertical valve body 38 which may be formed integral with the air conduit 12. The valve body is provided with a union 39 whereby it may be connected to a fuel pipe 40, the

bpposite end of this pipe being connected to a suitable source of fuel supply. The/valve body is provided with an axial bore 41 having a valve seat 42 formed at its-upper end.

The bore 41 is provided with a plurality of vertical grooves 43 for the passage of fuel in a manner to be described. These grooves communicate at their lower ends with radial passages 44 adapted to discharge fuel into a receiving member 45, as shown in Figure 2. Within the valve body, a plunger 46 is mounted to move vertically, and this plunger is providedwith a valve 47 at its upper end adapted to seat against the valve scat 42. A spring 48 is arranged in the valve body to normally seat the valve 47, and the lower end of this spring engages the inner end of a cap 49 preferably threaded in the lower end of the valve body.

The valve 46 also is provided with an axial bore/.50 in which is arranged a plunger 51. The upper end of the plunger 51 terminates in a valve 52 adapted to engage a seat 53 formed at the upper end of the bore 50. The upper end of the plunger 46 is provided with a passage 53 adapted to communicate with the interior of the plunger 46 when the valve is open. The bore is provided with a plurality of vertical passages or grooves 55 through which the fuel is adapted to flow downwardly when the valve 52 is open, and fuel from the interior of the plunger 46 [lows outwardly through radial passages 56 as shown in Figure 2. Obviously this fuel also is adapted to flow into the receiver 45 through the openings 44.

The lower end of the plunger 46 projects downwardly through the cap 49 and is provided with oppositely extending trunnions 57 (see Figure 8). The plunger 51 is provided with an elongated stem 58 whichprojects downwardly through the open lower end of the plunger 46, and is provided with a similar pair of oppositely extending trunnions 59. A spring 60 is arrangedwithin the plunger 46 and contacts at its upper end with the shoulder formed between the plunger 51 and stem 58. The lower end of this spring seats against a shoulder 61 formed within the lower end of the plunger 46.

A shaft 62 extends transversely through the air conduit and is journaled therein. This shaft is prvidedgat its outer end with any suitable Ymeans for rotating it, such as a crank 63, as shown in Figure 7. The shaft 62 is provided with an operating member 64 for the fuel feeding valves. The member 64 is provided with upper forks 65 adapted to engage. the trunnions 57 and lower forks 66 adapted to engage the trunnions 59, the latter forks coming into operation before the upper forks, as will be apparent from Figures 2 and 8. f

A throttle or air valve 67 is arranged in the air conduit 12 and is carried by a shaft 68 journaled in the air conduit. The upper end of the shaft 68 is provided with a crank arm 69 whereby it may be rotated, and a suitable operating rod 70 is connected to the crank 69.

It will be apparent that the rod 70 is adapted to be actuated `by the usual throttle lever or accelerator pedal. Any suitable means may be connected between the cranks 63 and (39 to operate these members in unison and for the sake of illustration I have shown a link 71 connected between' these cranks. Means are provided forV supplying liquid fuel to a point adjacent the impellers and for atomizing the fuel. As shown in Figures 1 and 5, an outlet pipe 72 communicates at one end with the receiver 45. The opposite end of this pipe is turned downwardly to discharge liquid fuel therefrom as indicated at 73. An atomizing cup 74 surrounds the sleeve 28 above the bearing 29. The atomizing cup mav be formed as a separate piece secured to the sleeve, or may be cast integral therewith. The atomizing cup is provided with a closed bottom 75 and an open top into which the end 73 of the fee-d pipe extends. The cup is further provided with an annular flange or side wall 76 t provided with relatively small perforations 77. It will be obviousthat the pipe 72 is adapted to discharge liquid fuel into the atomizing cup, while the latter is carried by the sleeve 28 to be rotated therewith.

The operation of the device is as follows Fuel is adapted to be supplied to the valve body 38 through the pipe 40, and there will be no downward flow of fuel through the valve body when the valves 47 and 52 are closed. Rotation of the shaft 62 initially nio ves the stem 58 downwardly to open the valve 52 whereupon fuel flows through this valve and downwardly through the passages 55. This fuel then flows outwardly through passages 56 and 44 into the receiver 45 from whence it is delivered to the atomizing cup 74 through pipe 72. During the operation of the engine it will be apparent that the shaft 23 will be driven through the pinion 24 to rotate the shaft 31 and sleeve 28 in opposite directions, as previously explained, and the gear ratio is preferably such that the shaft and sleeve referred to will be driven at a relatively high speed. Thus it will be apparent that the atoinizing cup will be driven from the sleeve 28 thus causing the fuel therein to be thrown outwardly through the perforations 77 by centrifugal force, this force, and the size of the openings 77 causing the liquid fuel to be effectually atomized. Due to the rotation of the impellers, the atomized fuel immediately will be drawn upwardly to be pumped toward the discharge pipe 17. The rotation of the lower impeller 30 causes the initial upward movement of the atomized fuel and also imparts a swirling movement thereto, thus greatly agitating the fuel and air passing through the pipe f 12, to cause vapoi'ization of the mixture. The mixture thus provided passes upwardly to the point where it is intercepted by the ygrating' 34 which arrests the swirling action of the mixture, and this action serves further to agitate the mixture. After passing upwardly through the grating the mixture is picked up by the oppositely rotating impcller 33 whic i assists in pumping the mixture toward the discharge pipe 17 and also imparts a swirling action to the mixture. Thus it will be apparent that the mixture is furthe-r agitated to convert it into a dry gas by assisting in the vaporization of the atomized fuel. It has been found that the mixture impelled to'the discharge pipe is in a dry highly vaporized condition and is thoroughly mixed to'provide a homogeneous explosive mixture. From the pipe 17, the mixture flows into the intake manifold for distribution to the engine cylinders in the usual manner.

It will be apparent that the opening of the fuel valve 52 previously referred to also is accompanied by the opening of the throttle 67 to permit the flow of the proper proportion of air through the pipe 12. Continued movement of the throttle valve for higher speeds brings the forks 65 into operation to nuove the plunger 46 downwardly and open the valve 47. Thus it will be apparent that fuel also will flow downwardly through the grooves 43, and from these grooves the 'fuel will flow to the receiver 45 through the passages 44. It will he apparent that after the forks 65 engage the trunnions 67, the inner I and outer plungers will move in unison and there will be no further opening of the valve 52. From the foregoing description it will be apparent that the, supply of explosive mixture to the engine cylinders is not dependent in any way upon the depression created within the intake manifold, the device constituting not only a carburetor but positive impelling means for pumping the mixture into the cylinders to satisfy the full volumetric requirements of the cylinders. For all speeds therefore a proper quantity of the explosive mixture by volume will be supplied to the engine cylinders. The present practice of providing hot spots to assist in the vaporization of the fuel is advantageous. but it has been found that when the fuel is too highly heated, the expansion of the explosive mixture causes the latter to become too greatly rarefied thus weakening the force of the explosion. The present device is adapted to provide a purely gaseous highly homogeneous mixture thus eliminating the necessity for hot spots, whereby it will be apparent that the explosive mixture may be supplied to the engine at any desired temperature to prevent the undue rarefication of the explosive charges.

It is to be understood that the form of my invention herewith shown and described is to be taken as a preferred example of the same and that various changes in the shape, size, and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the subjoined claims.

I claim:

1. A carburetor comprising a body having a passage therethrough, said passage including an inlet end communicat-ing with the atmosphere and an outlet end adapted to communicate with the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, impelling means arranged in said passage, an atomizing memoer arranged in the inlet end of said passage adj acent said impelling means and adapted to rotate therewith, said atomizing member having an annular wall provided with a series of radial perforations, and means for delivering liquid fuel to said atomizing member.

2. A carburetor comprising a body having a passage therethrough, said passage including an inlet end communicating with the atmosphere and an outlet end adapted to communicate with the intake manifold of arr internal combustion engine, a pair of oppositely rotatable impellers mounted in said passage and provided with imperforate oppositely pitched blades,y an atomizing cup mounted to rotate with one of said impellers and provided with an annular wall having radial perforations therein, and means for supplying liquid fuel to said cup.

3. A carburetor comprising a body having a passage therethrough, said passage including an inlet end communicating with the atmosphere and an outlet end adapted to communicate with the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a pair of axially alined rotatable impellers mounted in said passage and provided with oppositely pitched blades, ,a shaft connected to one of said im: pellers, a sleeve connected to the other of said impellers and surrounding said shaft, means for oppositely rotating said shaft and said sleeve, means for delivering atomized fuel to the inlet end of said passage adjacent one of said impellers, said means comprising an atomizing cup carried by said sleeve adjacent the impeller carried thereby, said cup including an annular wall having radial perforations therein, and means for delivering liquid fuel to said atomizing cup.

4. A carburetor comprising a body having a passage therethrough, said passage including an inlet end communicating with the atmosphere and an outlet end adapted to communicate with the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a pair of axially alined rotatable impellers mounted in said passage and provided with oppositely pitched blades, a shaft connected to one of said impellers, a sleeve connected to the other of said impellers and surrounding said shaft, mea-ns for oppositely rotating said shaft and said sleeve, means for. delivering atomized fuel to the inlet end of said passage adjacent one of said impellers, a throttle arranged in laid passage, and means for controlling the rate of supply of atomized fuel according to the position of said throttle.

5. A carburetor comprising a body having a passage therethrough, said passage including an mlet end communicating with the atmosphere andan outlet end adapted -to communicate with the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a pair of rotatable impellers arranged in said passage in axial alinement with each other and provided with oppositely pitched blades, a shaft connected to one of said impellers, a sleeve connected to the other impeller and surrounding said shaft, a drive shaft, a beveled gear carried by said drive shaft, beveled gears carried by said sleeve and said first named shaft and meshing with said first named beveled gear at opposite sides thereof, means for delivering atomized fuel into the inlet end of said passage adjacent one of said impellers, said meanslcomprising a cup carried by said sleeve adjacent the impeller carried thereby, said cup including an annular wall having radial perforations therein, and means for delivering liquid fuel to said cup.

6. A carburetor comprising a body having a passage therethrough, said passage including an inlet end communicating with the atmosphere and an outlet end adapted to communicate with the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, a pair of spaced` l,

rotatable impellers arranged in said passage and provided with oppositely pitched blades, means for rotating said impellers in oppo- ,site directions, a stationary grating arranged between said impellers and provided with a plurality of bladesI arranged substantially parallel to the axis of the portion of said passage in which said grating is arranged, and means for delivering atomized fuel into the inlet end of said passage adjacent one of said impellers. f

7 A -device constructed in accordance with claim 6 wherein the means' for delivering atomized fuel comprises a cup mounted to rotate with one of said impellers and provided with an annular wall having radial perforations therein, and means for delivering liquid fuel to said cup. f

In testimony whereof I atix my signature.

ROBERT L; DENNISON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2665892 *Jun 15, 1951Jan 12, 1954Anton RumplerRotary mixer type carburetor
US2693947 *Dec 7, 1951Nov 9, 1954Aerogen Company LtdGas manufacture
US2828115 *Nov 22, 1955Mar 25, 1958George C RegisterFuel atomizing and injecting device for internal combustion engines
US3804388 *Apr 17, 1972Apr 16, 1974F JamellHumidifier
US3822868 *Nov 19, 1970Jul 9, 1974Carnes CCarburetor
US4726342 *Jun 30, 1986Feb 23, 1988Kwik Products International Corp.Fuel-air ratio (lambda) correcting apparatus for a rotor-type carburetor for integral combustion engines
US4869850 *Dec 29, 1987Sep 26, 1989Kwik Products International CorporationRotor-type carburetor apparatus and associated methods
USRE33929 *May 12, 1988May 19, 1992Kwik Products International CorporationCentral injection device for internal combustion engines
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/89, 261/50.1
International ClassificationF02M17/16, F02M7/22, F02M7/00, F02M17/00, F02M29/00, F02M29/02
Cooperative ClassificationF02M7/22, F02M17/16, F02M29/02
European ClassificationF02M29/02, F02M17/16, F02M7/22