Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1730776 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 8, 1929
Filing dateDec 16, 1927
Priority dateDec 22, 1926
Also published asDE534290C
Publication numberUS 1730776 A, US 1730776A, US-A-1730776, US1730776 A, US1730776A
InventorsRagnar Lundgren Karl Torsten
Original AssigneeRagnar Lundgren Karl Torsten
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for the precipitation of particles suspended in liquids
US 1730776 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 8, 1 92 9.

K. T. R. LUNDGREN 1,730,776 APPARATUS FOR THE PRECIPITATION OF PARTICLES SUSPENDED IN LIQUIDS Filed Dec. 16, 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet l Oct. 8, 1929.

K. T. R. LUNDGREN 1,730,776 APPARATUS FOR THE PRECIPITATION OF PARTICLES SUSPENDED IN LIQUIDS Filed Dec. 16, 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Get. 8, i929 l,3@,l7

KARL TORSTEN RAGNAR LUNIDGREN, F LUND, SWEDEN APPARATUS FOR THE PRECIPITATION 0F PARTICLES SUSPENDED IN LIQUIDS Application filed December 16, 1927, Serial No. 240,609, and in Sweden December 22, 1926.

The present invention refers to such appipes in a position Where the greater pipe diparatus for the precipitation of particles susameter extends either tangentially or radially pended in a liquid, in which the centrifugal in relation to the circle described by the pipe force serves as a precipitating force, and at the rotation thereof. Furthermore, the

Which apparatus consists of holders for pipes holders carrying the pipes may preferably be 55 attached to a rotary shaft, said pipes being adjustably connected to the shaft of the apadapted to receive the particles in suspension paratus, so that the angle of inclination may to be precipitated. be altered, a controllable rate of precipita- In apparatus of this type as hitherto known, tion being thus obtained.

the holders carrying the pipes have been so The accompanying drawings illustrate (1 arranged that the longitudinal axis of the some embodiments of an apparatus accordpipes Would extend at right angles or subing to the invention. stantially at right angles to the axis of rota- Fig. 1 is an axial section of an apparatus tion. This results in that very high speeds of accm'diu-g to the one form of embodiment, and rotation have to be used, in order that any Fig. 2 is a top view thereof. Fig. 3 is a top as appreciable centrifugal effects shall be atview of a somewhat modified apparatus. tained at all, and these high speeds, in turn, Fig. 4 is a side view of an apparatus accordi'nvolve, first, that the apparatus must be con ing to a further modification, and Fig. 5 is a structed very sturdy, and, second, that the top view thereof. I motor driving the apparatus must be built, Referring first to Figs. 1 and 2, 1 designates for a comparatively high output, which all the housing of an electric motor, to the vertientails a considerable cost of manufacture. cal shaft 2 of which is secured a hub 3, the The present invention has for its object to top portion of which forms a circular disk avoid the above mentioned disadvantages, and 4C. Secured to said disk 4 is by means of to bring about a considerably increased censcrews 5 the top part of a conical shell or castrifugal effect at relatively low speeds of rotaiug 6, to the lower or base end of Which is tion, so that the apparatus can be built lighter secured a strengthening metal ring 7 having while the output of the motor is reduced at an angular cross-section. Inserted between the same time. the said disk 4 and the said ring 7 and sub- :50 Moreover, the invention has for its object stantially parallel to the inclined Wall of the 8@ to facilitate a controllable adjustment of the Casing 6 are metal pipes 8 forming holders rate of precipitation, the invention referring for glass pipes 9, in which the precipitation primarily to a construction adapted for contakes place when the casing 6 with the holders trollable adjustment of the said rate in blood 8 and the glass pipes S) is put in rotation by the tests for medical use, but obviously the invcnmotor 1. As visible, particularly from Fig. g5, tion may also be adapted to a controllable ad- 2, the pipes 8 and S.) have an elliptical crossj ustmeu't of the rate of precipitation of any section, the greater or main axis of which particles suspended in a liquid. extends tangentially to the circular path of The invention substantially consists in that the pipes. the holders for the precipitation pipes secured The Gll'lllOtlllllQIli] shown in Fig. 3 differs no to the shaft of the apparatus are so arranged from that above described in this respect only that the longitudinal axis of the pipes form an that the holder pipes 8 and thus also the glass acute angle with the axis of rotation of such pipes to be inserted therein are located With a number of degrees (preferably between 0 the main. axis of the cross-section substanand (30) that a high centrifugal eiliect is obtially radially to the path of movement of the taincd in comparison with the known apparapipes. c tus where the axis of the pipes forms a right In the form of embodiment shown in Figs. or substantially right angle with the axis 0f 4. and 5,2 designates a motor shaft (or a manuthe apparatus. The said holders may then ally driven shaft) having a hub 10 secured preferably be adapted to receive flattened thereto, said hub carrying a cruciform cross me head 11. Pivotally secured to the arms of said cross head are cylindrical holders 12 for glass pipes (not shown), said holders haying diametrically opposed strengthening w ngs l3. Turnably secured to the upper wings 13 of said holders are lugs 14 having transverse threaded bores for substantially diametrically disposed adjusting screw bolts 15, the ends of which are threaded in opposite directions and screwed into the lugs 14 of the oppositely located pairs of holders 12, there being two screw bolts 15 for each of said pairs. By turning said screws, the inclination of the holders 12 may be altered within the desired limits. The holders 12 may of course be flattened similarly to the holders 8 of Flgs. 1, 2 and 3.

Now, if the holders 12 with the glass pipes to be inserted therein are adjusted by means of the screws 15 under an acute angle to the axis of rotation (corresponding, for instance, to about 3 it will be found that the rate of precipitation will be considerably greater than when the pipes extend radially or substantially sowith res ect to the axis of rotation, as has hitherto een the case.

Investigations carried out have shown that the said increase of the rate of precipitation is determined with respect to its magnitude, first, by the diameter of the pipe, second, by the length of the pipe, and third, by the angle of inclination of the pipe to the axis of rotation, said increase being further determined so that the magnitude of the rate of precipitation will then primarily be dependent-on the horizontal distance ti -6 from the free liquid level to the vertical plane cutting the bottom surface of the pipe, as well as on the horizontal distance f,g from the upper side of the inclined pipe to the lower side thereof,

that is to say, the rate of precipitation is 1ncreased on an increase of the height of the and decreased on liquid column in the pipe,

The disan increase of the distance 7,-g

- tance (l -e, is influenced, partly by the length of the pipe and partly by its angle of inclination. The distance f,g, is influenced, partly by the angle of inclination of the pipe, and partly by the length of the pipe at right angles to 'the lane of inclination. On the other hand, t e pipe diameter parallel to the plane of inclination apparently does not alter the rate of precipitation in any appreciable degree, for which reason the pipe may be made fl at, without the rate of precipitation being altered thereby. Thus the advantage is obtained that the volume of the pipes may be altered Within certain limits while maintaining the rate of precipitation.

' If it is only desired to obtain a centrifugation of the suspended particles as rapid and complete as possible, the longitudinal axis of the pipe is disposed approximately parallel to the axis of rotation and with the great diameter of the pipe extending tangentially" diameter: of the to the circle described by the pipe at the rotation thereof.

What ll claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States of America is 1. An apparatus for the precipitation of particles suspended in a liquid, comprising a rotatable member, and holders for pipes secured thereto, said pipes being adapted to receive particles in suspension to be precipitated, said holders and the pipes thereon having their axes disposed at an angle not greater than to the axis of rotation of the rotatable member.

2. An apparatus for the precipitation of particles suspended in a liquid, comprising a rotatable member, and holders for pipes secured thereto, said pipes being adapted to receive particles in suspension to be precipitated, said holders and the pipes thereon hav arranged to receive flattened pipes in a position where the greater pipe diameter extends tangentially to the circle described by the pipe at the rotation thereof.

3. An apparatus for the precipitation of particles suspended in a liquid, comprising a rotatable member, and holders for pipes secured thereto, said pipes being adapted to receive particles in suspension to be precipitated, said holders and the pipes thereon having their axes disposed at an angle not greater than 50 to the axis of rotation of the rotatable member, and said holders being further connected to said rotary member adjustably into fixed positions, so that the angle of inclination of the pipes may be altered.

4. An apparatus for the precipitation of particles suspended in a liquid, comprising a rotatable member, and holders for pipes secured thereto, said pipes being adapted to receive particles in suspension to be precipitated, said holders and the pipes thereon having their axes disposed at an angle not greater than 50 to the axis of rotation of the rotatable member, and said holders being further arranged to receive flattened pipes in a position where the greaterpipe diameter extends tangentially to the circle described by the pipe at the rotation thereof and being connected to said rotary member in adjust able but fixed positions,so that the angle of inclination of the pipes may be altered.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.

KA Rl. TORSTEN RANGNAR LUNDGREN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2507309 *Apr 10, 1947May 9, 1950Allan Larsson GustavCentrifuge
US2728229 *Aug 23, 1952Dec 27, 1955Clay Adams IncThermometer shaker
US3233825 *Feb 11, 1963Feb 8, 1966Paul LombSelf-contained centrifuge
US3289927 *Oct 21, 1964Dec 6, 1966Josephine NelsonHospital thermometer shaker
US3794241 *Jun 19, 1972Feb 26, 1974Szentesi PRotor for high speed centrifuges
US4449965 *Oct 4, 1982May 22, 1984Beckman Instruments, Inc.Shell type centrifuge rotor having controlled windage
US4484906 *May 2, 1983Nov 27, 1984Beckman Instruments, Inc.Shell type centrifuge rotor retaining ruptured tube sample
US4824429 *Mar 15, 1988Apr 25, 1989Ultra-Centrifuge Nederland N.V.Centrifuge for separating liquids
US5232432 *Nov 27, 1991Aug 3, 1993Eberle GuenterAngular head for centrifuges
EP0002270A1 *Dec 1, 1978Jun 13, 1979Contraves AgDevice for separating erythrocytes
Classifications
U.S. Classification494/16
International ClassificationB04B5/00, B04B5/04
Cooperative ClassificationB04B5/0414
European ClassificationB04B5/04B2