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Publication numberUS1730916 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 8, 1929
Filing dateApr 29, 1927
Priority dateApr 29, 1927
Publication numberUS 1730916 A, US 1730916A, US-A-1730916, US1730916 A, US1730916A
InventorsCable Julius L
Original AssigneeCable Julius L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Folding chair
US 1730916 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 8, 1929. CABLE 1,730,916

FOLDING CHAIR Filed April 29, 1927 legs.

Patented Oct. 8, 1929 JULIUS In CABLE, OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS FOLDING CHAIR Application filed April 29,

This invention primarily relates to that type of folding chairs in which the seat is pivotally and slidably connected at its rear end to a pair of rear legs and at an intermediate point to a pair of front legs, which are extended to form a back and to which the rear legs are also pivoted, so that the whole chair may be folded fiat.

In forming the pivotal connection between the sides of the seatframe and the front legs, and between the ends ofthe rear legs and the front legs, it has been customary to pass bolts through the front legs into the seat frame and rear legs, leaving the heads of the bolts exposed at the outer sides of the front This is objectionable, not only because of the unsightly appearance of the bolt heads, but also on account of the fact that they are liable to work outward from the sides of the legs, so that they are likely to tear clothing.-

The objects of my invention are to provide a construction for a chair of the above described type which is constructed of semitubular metal strips and in which'the necessity of the provision of pivots between the seat and front legs, which will extend to, or be visible from the outer sides of the chair, will be avoided, so that there will be no protruding bolt heads in the construction which will be liable to tear clothing, and which will give a more finished appearance to the construction and increase its strength and reduce the manufacturing costs.

I accomplish these objects in the manner hereinafter described and as illustrated in the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective viewof a folding chair embodying my invention.

Fig. 2 is a side view thereof in folded position.

Figs. 3 and 5 are detail sectional views at lines 3-3 and 55 respectively of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a detail view of the specific connecting means which I employ.

Fig. 6 is a detail view at line 6-6 of Fig. 4. j

As shown in the drawing, the front legs and back frame are formed from a continuous semi-tubular strip of metal 10 bent in ends of the strips 1927. Serial No. 187,423.

U-form, so that the opposite portions are parallel and the slot formed between the longitudinal edges of the strip is arranged at the adjacent or inner sides. A back plate 11 is set into the slot at the semi-circular portion of the strip. The rear legs 12 and seat frame 13 are also formed of semi-tubular metal, the legs 12 being arranged so that the slot between the edges faces forwardly and the frame 13, so that its slot faces inward to receive the seat 14. The end portions of the seat frame are connected by pivots 15 to the shanks of clips 16, the latter each having a rounded head portion which is slidably fitted in the adjacent legs 12, as shown in Fig. 3.

According to the present invention I provide a pair of semi-tubular connecting metal strips 17 which have an external diameter corresponding to the internal diameter of the legs 10, and which are of suflicient length to extend for the greater portion of the length of the straight portions thereof, so that they may be slidably fitted therein, or telescoped therewith.

The upper ends of the rear legs 12 are connected to corresponding end portionsof the strips 17 by pivot bolts 18, the side portions of the legs being engaged with the middle portions of the strips, so that the bolts 18 pass through the, latter and through both sides of the legs and are riveted against the inner sides thereof. In like manner, the side portions of the seat frame are pivoted, at intermediate points therein, to strips 17 by bolts 19, 'which are middle portions of'both the frame and the strips, as shown in Fig. 6, the bolts 19 being secured by nuts 20, as shown, or by riveting.

To assemble the construction thus formed, the end portions of the strips 17, to which the legs 12 are pivoted, are inserted in the ends of the legs 10, in opposite relation thereto, and telescoped therewith until the engage thelower edge of the back plate against the semi-circular inner side of the top portion which connects legs 10. The length of the strips 17 and arrangement of the pivots 18, 19 with relation thereto, is

11 and force it firmly.

passed through tlie such that the pivots will then be held in the desired position with relation to the legs 10. Also, as thus arranged the strips 17 close the slot in the inner sides of the legs 10. A cross brace 21 is provided, having cylindrically formed end portions which are adapted to be slidably fitted within the legs 10, and these end portions are passed therein until they engage the lower ends of the strips 17 and then are secured in this position by rivets 22, as shown in detail on Fig. 5, thereby securely holding the strips 17 against longitudinal movement within the legs 10. The lower portions of the legs 12 are bound together by a brace in any convenient manner, as shown in Fig. 1.

With the above described construction the pivot bolts 18 and 19 are located within the strips 17, which close the slots in. the legs 10 for the portion thereof throughout which the strips 17 extend, and the outer ends of the pivot bolts are enclosed by the legs 10, but do not pass through the same, so that these pivots are not visible from the outersides. At

, the same time, the connection between the seat frame and front legs and between the rear legs and front legs 1s quite as secure as with the method previously employed. The

provide longitudinally slotted inner sides, a

construction also has a-more finished appearance than the previous construction, while its strength and rigidity is increased.

It has also been ascertained by experience that the manufacturing cost of the above described construction is substantially reduced as compared with the cost of a chair otherwise similarly constructed.

I claim:

1.'In a folding chair, a pair of front legs formed of semi-tubular metal arranged to provide longitudinally slotted inner sides, a pair of rear legs, nected at its rear end to said rear legs, semitubulai metal connecting strips fitted within said front legs, pivots extendingthrough said strips and slots and engaged with the top ends of said rear legs and intermediate portions of said seat frame, and means for holding said strips in fixed relation within said front legs.

2. In a folding chair, a pair'of front legs formed of semi-tubular metal arranged to pair or rear legs, a seat frame pivotally connected at its rear end to said rear legs, semitubular metal connecting strips fitted within said front legs, and arranged with their middle portions in position to close said slots, pivots extending through the middle portions of said strips and through said slots and en-' gaged with the top ends of said rear legs and with the sides of said seat frame at intermediate points therein and means for holding paid strips in fixed relation within said front egs.

3. In a folding chair, a pair of front legs portions of said strips and engaged with the inner sides of the latter at one end and pivotally connected at their opposite ends with the top portions of said rear legs and with the sides of said seat frame at intermediate points therein, and means for holding said strips in fixed relation with said front legs.

4.. In a folding chair, a semi-tubular metal frame section having its intermediate portion forming the chair back frame and its end portions forming the front legs and arranged to provide a continuous longitudinal slot at the inner side thereof, a seat back fitted in said slot within said intermediate portion, a pair of rear legs, a seat frame pivotally and slidably connected at its rear end with intermediate portions of said rear legs, semi-tubular connecting strips fitted within said front legs arranged with their middle portions in position to close said slots, and engaged at their upper ends with said back plate, bolts extending through said slots and'the middle portions of said strips and forming pivotal connections between said strips and the top said rear legs and with intermediate side portions of said seat frame, and means for holding said strips in fixed relation with said frame section.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

JULIUS L. CABLE.

a seat frame pivotally con- V

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2607399 *Feb 12, 1948Aug 19, 1952Lyon Metal Products IncMetal folding chair
US2620019 *Oct 21, 1950Dec 2, 1952American Seating CoFolding chair
US2801683 *Sep 18, 1952Aug 6, 1957Peabody Seating Company IncFurniture
US2877829 *Feb 10, 1955Mar 17, 1959Shwayder BrothersFolding chair
US7073852 *Nov 7, 2000Jul 11, 2006Edward ZhengCollapsible chair with tensioned seat
US8029059Apr 13, 2009Oct 4, 2011Mity-Lite, Inc.Folding and stacking mesh chair system
US8033598Apr 13, 2009Oct 11, 2011Mity-Lite, Inc.Mesh folding chair
US8033612Apr 13, 2009Oct 11, 2011Mity-Lite, Inc.Comfortable mesh folding chair
US8038221Apr 13, 2009Oct 18, 2011Mity-Lite, Inc.Folding mesh chair with nesting hoops
US8317269Nov 4, 2009Nov 27, 2012Mity-Lite, Inc.Mesh stacking chair
US8322787Nov 4, 2009Dec 4, 2012Mity-Lite, Inc.Clamping joint for a chair
US8454093Mar 29, 2010Jun 4, 2013Mity-Lite, Inc.Mesh chair with open-end hoop
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/58
International ClassificationA47C4/00, A47C4/24
Cooperative ClassificationA47C4/24
European ClassificationA47C4/24