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Publication numberUS1733763 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1929
Filing dateApr 26, 1927
Priority dateApr 26, 1927
Publication numberUS 1733763 A, US 1733763A, US-A-1733763, US1733763 A, US1733763A
InventorsWerner Wilbur S
Original AssigneeWerner Wilbur S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Diathermy apparatus
US 1733763 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 29, 1929. W s WERNER DIATHERMY APPARATUS Filed April 26,

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Patented Oct. 29, 1929 UNITED STATI-:s

WILBUR s. WERNER, oF COVINGTON, xENrucxY DIATHERMY Arrmrus Application alea faprii 26,

My invention relates to improvements in diathermy apparatus that is, apparatus adapted to be employed usually under the direction of physicians and surgeons for the creation or development of heat within the p living body tissues by passing high frequency electrical currents through the tissues of the,y body 1n such manner as to avoid shock or 1njury thereto. One of its objects is to provide 10 a method and apparatus for developing current of safe and suitable character for such purpose. Another object is to produce current of safe and suitable character for such purpose and of variable Wattage to provide for the development of a greater or less amount of heat per unit of time.- Another object is to provide apparatus for the above purpose in which the generated high frequency current is maintained and retained at such a character as to be free from such pulses as would act inj uriously and painfully on the nervous system of a patient. My invention also comprises certain details of form andarrangement and combination of components, all of which will be fully set forth in the description of the accompanying drawings in which,

Fig. 1 represents an electrical circuit diagram embodying my improvements in apparatus, and adapted to carry out my improved method.

Fig. 2 is a perspective of a cabinet with my improved apparatus mounted therein, 'and with the controlling means mounted thereon.

. ing tissues so as to develop heat at any desired locality within the tissues due to the resist- 5 ance of the tissues to the passage of the cur- Fig. 3 is a diagram similar to Fig. 1 illus- '1927. serial No. 186,746.

rent, provided however, that such high frequency current is substantially uniform and is free from pulsations of suiiiciently low frequency to affect'and be painful to the nervous system. y

The accompanying drawings illustrate em bodiments of my invention. In Fig. 1, 15 and 16 lrepresent the line Wires or source of energy, for instance the line Wires of an alternating current of approximately sixty cycles per second and approximately one hundred and ten or two hundred and twenty volts. A protective condenser 124, suitably insulated to withstand the voltage of the supply line, has three connecting studs of which 122 and 65 123 are connected to the lines 15 and 16, and 121 is connected directly to ground. A main double pole switch 17 is preferably employed -to cut in and cut out the energizing current to a primary or low frequency circuit 18. An auxiliary switchy or control lever 19 is connected in onebranch of the primary circuit 18, and is adapted to be shifted by hand to close the primary circuit through a contact member 21 from which branches 22 of the 75' primary circuit lead respectivelyto a timer switch 24 adapted to be automatically closed by a clock or similar mechanism, for a predetermined time period and to a switch 23 adapted to be actuated by the foot of the physo sician or operator to close 'the primary circuit. The control lever 19 is adapted to be shifted by hand to positively close the primary circuit through contact member 55.

Included in the primary circuit 18 is an S5 inductance coil ,25 and the primary 26 of a step up transformer of which 27 is the secondary. The inductance coil 25 comprises a core of magnetic material 30 upon which is wound a coil of insulated wire 31, having a series of 90 taps 32 leading respectively to terminal members 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40 and 41, which terminal members 33 to 41 are spaced apartand arranged concentrically about a center or axis 42 upon one side thereof. Upon the op- 95 posite side of the axis 42 from the Contact members 33 to 41 are arranged a corresponding or counterpart series of terminal members 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51 and 52 spaced apart and arranged concentrically about the axis 42. A series of spark gap terminals 53 are adjustable in pairs to and from each other to vary the gap length and arranged substantially as 4shown in Fig. 1 and in electrical connection with reference to the terminal members44 to 52 so that one or any desired number of said spark gaps may beactively included in series in the hi h frequency circuit through one or other o said terminals 44 to 52. A duplex electrical switch which I prefer to designate as a reso ap switch 54, is mounted to be rotatably a justed about the axis 42.

. The switch 54 comprises a main body or pair of arms of electricalinsulating material. Upon the outer or free end of one of said arms is a switch member or contact member 57 adapted to successively make contact with one or other of the contact members 33, to 41.

' Upon the free end of the other arm of switch 54 is a switch member or contact member 58 adapted to successively make contact `w1th one or other of the contact members 44 to 52.

. The switch member 57 is included in the primary circuit 18, while `the switch ,member The high frequency circuit eo, which isin-- directl v part o throu h electrostatic induction a he spar gapl high tension circuit 59, 1s connected to the opposite terminals of the condensers 65 and 66, and comprises an insulated coil or inductance 63 connected across from the condenser 65 to the condenser 66,

v electrostatic induction. High Aand a series of terminals 67, 68, 69, and 70,

from which current may be selectively taken and applied to a patient. A monopolar cir- 4cuit branch 71 in which is included a coil 72,

preferably in position to be inductively iniluf'- enced by the coil 63 is adapted to pass'high frequency current rough the terminal 68 and thence through a patlent to a ground by frequency current is also adapted to be taken in relatively large or'small measured quantity through one or other of the meters 108 and 109, and through a patient between the terminals 67 and 69. Also unmeasured current is adapted to be taken through a patient between the terminals 67 and 70.

In Fig. 2 I have illustrated a cabinet 73 in which my improved apparatus may be conveniently housed for use in which the series of spark gap members may be conveniently observed while in operation through a window 74, while the meters 108 and 109 may be also conveniently observed. The central switch knob 75 serves to adjust or operate the resogap switch 54. The switch knob 77 serves to open and close the switch 17 the switch knob 79 .serves to adjust the switch 19. v The switch knob 76 serves to adjust the meter switch 110 of Fig. 1, and the switch knob 78 may be employed to variably adjust the length of the spark gaps 53. I have also shown apertures 114 and 115', through which the line wires or cables 15, 16 and-121 may be brought for further connection internally.

.Terminals at which fuses may be conveniently inserted or renewed are ay part 'of a board, which carry the connecting studs. I have also shown an aperture 116, into which an insulating connection board is fitted, which carries terminals or outlets into which lines leading to the patient may be plugged. The terminals 117 represent the connectin point 68 of Fig. 1, terminal 120 represents the connecting point of Fig. 1, terminal 119 represents connecting point 69 of Fig. l, and ter- ?.ina 118 represents connecting point 67 of 1 1%: will be noted that the resogap switch when operated serves through the switch member 57 to cut in or cut out successive fraccircuit 18, while at the same time an operation. the switch member 5 8 serves to cut out .or cut in a fraction of the spark gap terminals 53, and that these operations are related one to the other so that when the major portion ofthe inductance coil 31 is in the prirmary circuit a minor portion of the s ark ap terminals 53 are included in the igh requenc circuit. Thus when the current flow in t e primary circuit is at a minimum by including practically all of the inductance coil 31 in the primary circuit, the spark lgap in the high frequency circuit is also cut down in length and resistance to a minimum, and

when the current flow in the primary circuitl is increased by cuttingout of circuit a major portion of-the inductance coil 31, a correspending number of spark. gap terminals 53 are included in series in the high frequency d circuit thereby increasing the total length and ,resistance of the spark gap in the high frequency circuit.

' The conditions usually encountered in this type of apparatus are such thatthere is normally a deficiency in inductance rather than a deciency in c apacity in the'primary circuit. In Fig. 1 I have shown my improved resogap unit applied to meet `such normal conditions of the circuit, that is to increase and decrease the inductanc'e in the primary circuit. It may, however, where the inductance in circuit is in excess, require an adjustment to increase and decrease the amount of capacity in the primary circuit, instead of varying the inductance in the primary circuit, in which event the resogap unit is 'arranged in, the circuit substantially as illustrated in Fig. 3, to increase or decrease the amount of capacity in the primary circuit to correspond to different adjustments of the length or resistance of the series of spark gaps.

As illustrated in the modification Fig. 3,

posed between one terminal of the circuit 83 and one'of a series of electrical terminals 85, 8G, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92 and 93, corresponding to the terminals 33 to 41 of Fig. 1. The series of terminals 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101 and 102, corresponding to the terminals 44 to 52 of Fig. 1, are connected Vup with a plumhty of Spark gap members 104 correspond' yprimaryl circuit energized from an alternating to the spa rk gap members 53 of Fig. 1. A switch lever 105 having insulated terminals 10G and 107, corresponding to the switch lever 54 and terminals 57 and 58 of Fig. 1 is employed to mutually adjust the relation of the condensers, or capacity, 84, and the spark gap members 104 instead of mutually adjusting the relation of the inductance and the spark 4gap 'as shown in Fig. 1. The conditions shown in Fig. 1 will be those most encountered in practice.

Prior methods and apparatus have been directed to providing an inductance or resistance to primarily regulate the voltage of a step-upt1'ansformer, which permitted only a relatively small portion of the peak of each alternation to be usefully employed, leaving relatively wide intervening gaps of practically no current flow. My improved method aims to decrease the time interval of the nil period, and to utilize to better advantage the period of current iiow. My improved method generally provides `a calibrated tapped inductance which is so correlated with the spark gaps as to establish resonance of the transferred capacity of the high frequency circuit, with the inductance in the primary circuit, to the power supply frequency, for each specific number of gaps used. Establishing resonance as in my improved method, magnifies and increases the voltage across the condensers in the high frequency circuit. This makes it possible to usefully employ a greater portion of the impressed low frequency wave than was formerly possible in the creation of high frequency current.

Employing a greater portion of the wave als in my improved method, decreases the interval between the successive trains of oscillations, thereby' increasing the time interval of the high frequency current flow, and de creasing the time interval of the nil period.

vheretofore attainable.

The time interval or relative length of the nil period is the criterion of the presence or absence of shock to the patient. My improved method and apparatus reduces the time interval of the nil period to an extent below that Furthermore since the .time interval of the successive trains of oscillations is increased, the average useful output is correspondingly increased.

The apparatus herein shown and described is capable of considerable modification within the scope of the clainls without departing from the spirit of my invention.-

What Ipclaim is:

1. A diathermy apparatus comprising a circuit energized from an alternating source of energy, a high frequency circuit, and means adjustable to balance said circuits by making a change in one of said circuits and making a corresponding change in the other of said circuits.

2. A diathermy apparatus comprising a quency circuit energized from said primary circuit, and means adjustable to variably control the amount of energy flowing in said primary circuit and to make a corresponding change in said high frequency circuit.

4. A diathermy apparatus comprising a primary circuit energized from an alternating source of energy, a resonated high fre4 quency circuit energized from said primary circuit, an adjustable inductance included in -said primary circuit, a plurality of spark gaps in series included in said high frequency circuit, and switch mechanism to mutually adjust said inductance and spark gaps to maintain said primary circuit and high frequency circuit in a substantially balanced position. 1

5. A diathermy apparatus comprising a low frequency alternating circuit, a high frequency alternating current circuit energized from said low frequency circuit, and means adjustable to change the amount of energy in said low frequency circuit and at the same time change the amount of spark gap in said high frequency circuit.

6. A diathermy apparatus comprising a primary alternating current circuit, a secondary alternating current circuit energized from said primary circuit, a high frequency circuit created by said secondary circuit, and means adjustable to change the amount of energy in said primary circuit and at the same time change said secondary circuit to correfrequency current circuit energized rom said' primary circuit and in which are included in series a plurality of spark gaps, and means to adjust said primar circuit to vary .the energy therein and to adjust the spark gap in said high frequency circuit.

9. A diathermy apparatus comprising a primar alternating current circuit in which are inc uded inductance and capacity, a high frequency circuit energized from said primary circuit and in whichare included in tance to the capacit in said primay J series a plurality of spark gaps, and means adjustable to substantially simultaneously change the relation of the inductance to the capacity in said primary circuit and to change the relation of said spark gaps to said high frequency circuit.

10. A diathermy apparatus comprising a primary alternating current circuit in which are included inductance and capacit a high frequency current circuit energized om said primary'circuit and' in which is included in series a plurality of spark gaps, and a resogap switch having a first switch arm section adjustable to change the relation of the induccircuit and a second switc arm section a ustable with said first switch arm section and servin tochan e the number of spark gaps include in said h frequency circuit.

1-1. A iathermy apparatus comprising a primariy7 alternating current circuit in wh1ch are mc u frequency current circuit energlzed om said primar circuit and in which is included an adjusta le spark gap, and a reso ap switch having a first switch arm adjusta le to vary the relation of the inductance to the capacit in said primary circuit and a second switc arm adjustable with said first switch arm and A serving to -vary the number of spark gaps in said secondary circuit. j

12. A diathermy apparatus comprising a prima alternating current circuit in which are inc uded inductance and capacity, a secondary alternating current circuit enero'ized from said primary circuit and in which 1s included an adjustable spark gap, a high frequency circuit generated from said secondary v circuit, and switch mechanism having a rst switch arm adjustable to vary the relation of'the inductance to the capacity in said primary circuit and a second switch arm adjustable with said first switch arm and serving to var the amount of spark gap included in said hig frequencycircuit.

13. The method of producingv diathermy current which comprises exciting a high tension circuit by induction from a primary alternatin current, exciting a' high'frequency current rom said high tension current, and adjustabl current amountwo spark high fr uency current changing the wattage employe in said primary circuit.

14. The method of producing diathermy current which comprises exciting a high fension current by induction from a primary alternating current exciting a high frequency simultaneously changing the controlling said hioh frequencyl gap inthe circuit of said j current fronisaid high tension current and adjustably balancing said high tension and high fre uency currents b amount di spa-rk gap in sai high frequency circuit and at the same time changing the wattage in said'primary circuit.

15. A diathermy apparatus comprising a primary alternating current circuit in which are included inductance and capacity, a secondary alternating current circuit energized nature.

WILBUR S. WERNER.

ded inductance and capaci a high v changing the

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3011095 *Jul 2, 1959Nov 28, 1961Honeywell Regulator CoElectric load control system
US3093136 *May 25, 1960Jun 11, 1963Mine Safety Appliances CoVentricular defibrillator
US6529775Jan 16, 2001Mar 4, 2003Alsius CorporationSystem and method employing indwelling RF catheter for systemic patient warming by application of dielectric heating
DE902288C *Feb 12, 1935Jan 21, 1954Bindo Riccioni DrAnordnung zum Behandeln von Samenkoernern, Zellen usw. im elektrischen Feld von Funkenstrecken
Classifications
U.S. Classification315/188, 607/76, 315/282, 315/259, 315/279, 315/242, 607/98, 313/306, 315/291, 331/127, 313/307
International ClassificationA61N1/40
Cooperative ClassificationA61N1/40
European ClassificationA61N1/40