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Publication numberUS1736188 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1929
Filing dateJun 27, 1928
Priority dateJun 27, 1928
Publication numberUS 1736188 A, US 1736188A, US-A-1736188, US1736188 A, US1736188A
InventorsDaesen John R, Wemple Leland E
Original AssigneeIllinois Zinc Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for pouring molten metal
US 1736188 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 19, 1929, J. R. DAESEN Er A1. 1,736,188

APPARATUS Fon POURING MoLTEN METAL Filed June 2'7. 1928 2 Sheets-,Sheet l rf/REE warn/,awe /0 /6 SAFE rr /u/E CaMP/rfssea AIR f5 V 2 2,

A TTURNEYS Nov. E9, 19291 J. R. DAESEN Er As.

APPARATUS FOR POURING MOLTEN METAL Filed June 27. 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 WITNESS A Patented Nov.. 19, 1929 ATENT OFFICE JOHN R. DAESEN, OF PERU, AND ZEELAND E. WEMPLE, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, AS- SIGNORS TO ILLINOIS ZINC COMPANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION 0F ILLINOIS Application led June 27,

AOur invention relates tos apparatus for pouring molten metal into molds and among its objects areto permit more eiiieient liandling of the metal and to eliminate the introduction of oxides, dresses. and the like into the mold. The apparatus is particularly adapted to the casting of molten .zinc into slabs suitable for rolling ito sheets and strips but is not confined to t 'e casting of zinc.

i An illustrative emb diment of our invention is shown in the accompanying drawings in which Fig. 1 is a sectional elevation of the apparatus showing the same immersed in 'a melting pot (only a portion of the latter bcing shown) Fig. 2 is a sectional plan view along the line 2-2 of Fig. 1; and Fig. 3 is a similar view` along the line f3---3 of Fig. 1..

Y The molten metal 2a is contained in a vessel 2. Our new apparatus is shown partially v immersed in themetal and inreadiness for pouring the same into a mold 2b. The apparatus consists of a vessel 1 constructed preterably of suitable heat resisting material such as fire clay. The vessel is divided into two chambers 3 and 4 bya depending wall 5 so arranged as to leave a passage 5a between the two chambers. Chamber 3 is open to the. at-

" mosphere while chamber 4 has no communlcation with the atmosphere, when filled with metal, except through tube 14. The bottom of the vessel is provided with .an aperture 6 tted with a plug 7 attached to one end of a .rod 7 a, the other end of which is provided with suitable means for the raising or lowering of such rod and plug. These means may be of any suitable construction andv as illustrated consist of a piston 8 reciprocating in cylinder 9 which is in communication through pipe 11 with pipe 14 for the purpose to be hereinafter described.` A spring 12 serves normally to push the piston and its associated rod and plug in an upward direction.

Pipes 14 extend through the roof of the chamber 4 and are connected with a supply of a suitable pressure medium under pressure, for instance, compressed air. For convenience of operation the pipes 14 are each united at its upperend with the end-of pipe 10 which is in direct communication with the source of pressure but is provided with a suitable .APPARATUS .FOR TOURING MOLTE-N MEI-AIA i928. serial No. 288,621.

'. valyef such as a three-way valve by lmeans of rwhich pipes 14 may be shut oli' from the source of pressure or may be so shut ofi' while sphere preferably by providing a connection l such as pipe 'or-pipes 11 with one or both of p ipes 14, thus providing a free communication w1th the atmosphere for chamber 9 whenever oneor both of pipes 14 are in free com-v munication with-the atmosphere. A suitable trough 13 is so arranged as to r; 'five metal rising in chamber-3 and transfer it to the mold 2b.

The operation of our apparatus is as follows: The valve 15 is set in such a manner as to prevent free communication between the atmosphere andthe interior of the pipe 10 and therefore 4also the interior of pipes 11 and 14 and to the upper portion of cylinder 9, thus causing the spring 12 to raise rod7a and plug 7. The vessel 1 is then introduced into the molten metal some of which passes through opening 6 into chambers 3 and 4, care being taken not to introduce the vessel so deeply into the metal as to causethe latter to flow over the lower edge of chamber 3. The valve l5 is then adjusted in such a manner as to close the communication to the atmosphere and open communication .with the source of compressed air. The compressed air will-then ow through pipe 10 into pipes 14 and 11.v The strength of the spring 12 is so adjusted that as the air pressure rises within the apparatus the spring will immediately be compressed, and opening 6 closed by plug 7 so as to prevent as far as possible escape of of the metal in chamber 4 does not, durinfr the casting operation, fall below the top o? the passage 5a.

When the level of the metal in chamber 4 has been lowered to such a degree as to make a refilling o-'f-suchA chamber desirable the valvef1'5 is so turned as to shut otfvthe connection with the source of pressure and open a connection to the atmosphere, thus interrupting the casting process permitting spring 12 to raise the plug 7 and allowing metal from the melting p ot 2 to rise within the apparatus.

If it is practical to do so our apparatus may be left within the melting-pot at all times even during the process of melting the metal.

While we have referred to compressed air as the medium through which to exert pressure upon the surface of the metal in chamber 4,

it is obvious that we may use instead of comressed'air any other suitable material, for instance either some other compressed gas or evensolid material. If solid material be used it would form a piston in chamber 4 and a'piston rod or rods within pipe or pipes 14. Y

Preferably all of the parts of our apparatus such as the inner Walls of chambers 3 and 4, the walls of the passage 5, the aperture 6, the trou'gh 13, and the rod'7, are made of material which will not contaminate the metal to be poured-for instance :tire clay, if the apparatus is to be used for pouring zinc. y

Although we have described a specific embodiment of our invention it is to be understood that the invention is not restricted to such particular embodiment. Various modifications thereof in detail and in the arrangement of the parts may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the invention as defined in the claims. For instance only one pipe 14 may be employed, or ,three or more of such pipes, or pipe 11 may be connected directly to pipe 10, and the parts which come into contactwith the Imetal may be only lined with non-contaminating material instead of being constructed entirely of Such material.

We claim: I Y

1. In an apparatus for' pouring molten metals, the combination of a receiver for the molten metal suitable for immersion in a melting pot and having two chambers in` communication with each other, an aperture in said receiver through which the molten metal is admitted to said chambers when the receiver is positioned within a melting pot,a closure for said aperture at the. end of a rod extending through the' molten metal to a point outside said receiver, mechanism for positively actuating said rod and therefore said closure, and a source of pressure communicatingA with one of said chambers and operative to force the molten metal in said chamber into the other chamber, and thence into a mold.

2. In an apparatus for pouring molten metals, the combination 0f a receiver for the molten metal suitable for immersion ina melting pot and'having two chambers in communication with each other, an aperture in said receiver through which the molten metal is admitted to said chambers wheny the receiver is positioned within a melting pot. a closure for said aperture at the end of a rod ext-ending through the molten metal to a point outside said receiver, a vsource of pressure communicating with one of said chambers and operative to force the molten metal in said chamber into the other chamber, and

thence into a mold and mechanism actuated by and simultaneously with the application of pressure to said metal, including a iuid operated piston to positively actuate said rod andtherei'ore said closure to close said aperture to prevent escape of metal therethrough.

3. An apparatus such as claimed in claim 2 in which the mechanism for operating the closure comprises a cylinder, a piston movable within said cylinder, a rod connecting the piston and the closure and a spring surrounding said rod and tending normally to retract said closure from its opening.

4, In an apparatus for pouring molten metals, the combination of a receiver for the molten metal suitable for immersion in a melting pot and having two chambers in communication with each other, an'aperture in said receiver through which the molten metal is admitted to said chambers when the receiver is positioned within a melting pot, a closure for the aperture, a valve controlled cond uit, a conduit connecting the sameto one i of said chambers and forming therewith a continuous conduit, a third vconduit connected with said. continuous conduit and' connecting the same with a cylinder, a piston within said cylinder, a rod connecting said piston with said closure and a spring surrounding the rod.

' JOHN R. DAESEN.

LELAND E. WEMPLE.

iso

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2741006 *Jun 3, 1952Apr 10, 1956Kux Machine CompanyMeans for delivering charges of molten metal
US2936326 *May 2, 1955May 10, 1960Ajax Magnethermic CorpMethod and apparatus for pressure metal dispensing
US2939899 *Nov 14, 1955Jun 7, 1960Lindberg Eng CoMetal melting furnace
US3162909 *Oct 25, 1961Dec 29, 1964Griffin Wheel CoApparatus for pressure pouring articles
US3472285 *Mar 24, 1967Oct 14, 1969Standard Oil CoInjection leak sealing apparatus and method
US4534709 *Apr 20, 1984Aug 13, 1985United States Of America As Represented By The United States Department Of EnergyWater displacement mercury pump
US5146974 *Oct 2, 1990Sep 15, 1992Globe-Union Inc.Lead pouring system
US5630464 *Nov 3, 1995May 20, 1997Spartan Light Metal Products, Inc.Cold chamber magnesium pump assembly
US6293759Oct 31, 1999Sep 25, 2001Bruno H. ThutDie casting pump
US6805834Sep 25, 2002Oct 19, 2004Bruno H. ThutPump for pumping molten metal with expanded piston
US7011202May 16, 2001Mar 14, 2006Farmer Mold & Machine Works, Inc.Conveyor for moving flat battery components
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/118, 222/595
International ClassificationB22D39/02, B22D39/00
Cooperative ClassificationB22D39/02
European ClassificationB22D39/02