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Publication numberUS1738845 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1929
Filing dateMay 8, 1928
Priority dateMay 8, 1928
Publication numberUS 1738845 A, US 1738845A, US-A-1738845, US1738845 A, US1738845A
InventorsRollman Michael A
Original AssigneeRollman Michael A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sadiron stand
US 1738845 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 10, 1929. M.-A. ROLLMAN 1,733,345

SADIRON STAND Filed May 8; 1928 SADIRUN STAND application filed May 8,

The objectof this invention is to provide an inexpensively-constrncted stand which is adapted to support a sad iron when not in use, the desirable form being the one which is reversible, one, the upper, side being adapted for supporting the iron from time to time during the ironing operation, and the other, lower, side being adapted to support the iron when the ironing work is finished and the iron is put away, as more fully hereinafter set forth.

In the drawing annexed,

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of one form of my device;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view on the line 22 of Fig. 1;

3 is a transverse sectional view on the line of Fig. 1;

Figs. 1 and 5 are sectional views showing 20 modified forms of the device.

liteferring to Figs. 1, Q; and 3, 1O designates a metallic plate having a shape substantially the same as the bottom of the iron, but larger than the same. This plate is provided all 25 around its edge with a downwardly-turned flange 11 which is adapted to rest on the table and thus support the plate 10 a distance above the table. This flange 11 is in turn provided with an outwardly-extending 30 flange 12 at the forward end as well as at the rear corners to provide feet. For stifiening the plate, to thus enable me to use a thin metal sheet, I provide a bead 13 extending around the point and the sides of the plate, this bead being desirably omitted at the rear end of the stand.

(In the upper face of the plate 10 is a se ries of upstanding disks of insulating material 13, such as asbestos, five of these disks so being shown in the present instance. These disks are fastened to the plate 10 by being crimped in holes therein, the crimping flanges being shown at 141-. Secured by rivets 15 to the under face of the plate 10 is an insulating-plate 16, which is substantially the same in area as the bottom face of the plate 10 and is shaped to fit against the rim-flange 11. The lower faces of the knobs or disks 13 abut the adjacent face of this insulating-slieet 16. The iiisulatingdisks 13 sup- 1328. Serial No, 276,140.

port the iron free of the metal plate 10 and also the head 13, these disks being thick enough to thus keep the iron out of contact with said bead 13. These supporting-disks 13 are used to support the iron from time to time during the ironing operation. When the ironing is finished and it is desirable to put the iron away on a shelf or other support, the stand is reversed, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, to thus form a trayfor the iron, the iron resting upon the insulating-sheet 16. In this way, the hot iron will be kept away from the metal not only during the ironing operation, but after it is stored away, thus de creasing fire risk to a minimum Also, when the iron is put in the tray and the tray is put away, the disks 13 form legs or feet which raise the metal part of the device above the supporting surface to thus avoid all danger of fire from a hightly-heated iron. The rivets 15 are desirably counter-sunk in the insulating-plate 16 to avoid direct communication of heat from the iron to the plate 10.

In Fig. 4:, the disks 14 are secured directly to the top face of the plate 10 each by a rivet 17, to thus avoid the necessity of out ting large holes in the plate 10 and also the use of the crimping-flanges 14. These rivets 17 also avoid the necessity of using the separate rivets 15.

In Fig. 5, I showinsulating abutments or disks l8 substituted for the insulating-plate 16, to thus economize in the use of insulating material. In this construction, Fig. 5, it will be observed that I also avoid the use of the crimping-flanges 1d and, as in Fig. 1, I provide a firmer support for both the disks 1 1 and for the insulating medium located on the opposite surface of the plate 10.

What I claim as new is:

1. A sad-iron stand consisting of a single sheet of thin metal of substantially the shape of the bottom of the iron but larger in area than the same, formed with a depending apron or flange extending entirely around the edge of the sheet and provided at its forward end as well as its two rear corners with lateral extensions forming feet, said sheet being also formed around its sides and forward edge with an upstanding bead, each face of said sheet being provided with insulating material to prevent contact of the bottom of the iron with the sheet, thereby providing a device which in one position will serve .as-an insulating stand and in the reverse position will provide an insulating tray.

2. A sad-iron stand consisting of a plate .7 of metal substantially the shape of the bottom of the iron but larger inarea than the same, formed with a depending apron extending entirely around the edge of the sheet,

each face of said sheet being provided with insulating material, and rivets fastening said insulating material to the respective faces of said-sheet, said rivetsextending through the insulating material and the intermediate sheet and being counter-sunk in the insulating material.

3. A sad-'ron stand consisting of a plate of metal substantially the shape of the bottomof the iron but larger in area than the same,-formed with a depending apron extending entirely around the edge of the sheet, each face of said sheet being provided with insulating material in the form of disks clamped to the opposite faces of said plate by rivets extending through the disks and the intermediate plate and having their heads counter-sunk in the disks. I

In testimony whereof .I -hereunto atlix my 7 signature.

MICHAEL ROLLMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2530471 *Jun 8, 1948Nov 21, 1950Kopisch Le Roy CIron rest
US2684821 *May 2, 1949Jul 27, 1954Gen Mills IncIroning stand
US2778589 *Feb 18, 1952Jan 22, 1957Peterson Edwin FSupporting pad for hot flat irons
US3215379 *Jan 28, 1963Nov 2, 1965Rico Ignacio OFlat iron stand
US4399975 *Jan 12, 1981Aug 23, 1983Trimarco Emil PSupport structure for mounting heavy objects
US5031778 *Mar 15, 1990Jul 16, 1991Vernald EdgecombeSupport assembly for a hair dryer and like instruments
US6250593 *Apr 19, 1999Jun 26, 2001Emmepi Di Manfrenuzzi MariaHolding and support element for irons
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/117.3
International ClassificationD06F79/02, D06F79/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F79/02
European ClassificationD06F79/02