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Publication numberUS1739840 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1929
Filing dateAug 10, 1925
Priority dateAug 14, 1924
Publication numberUS 1739840 A, US 1739840A, US-A-1739840, US1739840 A, US1739840A
InventorsKendall Sydney Wilmer
Original AssigneeKendall Sydney Wilmer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Proofing cellulosic, animal, and other substances against insects, animals, and organisms
US 1739840 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Dec. 17, 1929 UNITE sATas SYDNEY WILMER KENDALL, F EAiLING, LONDON, ENGLAND PBOOFING CELLULOSIC,

ANIMAL, AND OTHER SUBSTANCES AGAINST INSECTS,

ANIMAL 8, AND ORGANISMS no Drawing. Application filed August 10, 1925, Serial m. 49,482,

velopment of spores and organisms, such as fungi, moulds, mildews, rots and the like and also to vegetable growths both of the land and water varieties.

To this end my invention consists broadly in a process tor the treatment of materials,

[5 according to which process one or more compounds are deposited on, incorporatedv with or otherwise applied to the material being treated, the compounds having as a base radical a rare earth metal or a rare element and as an acid radical, a higher organic acid.

My invention further consists in the process for treating materials, protective compounds or compositions, and materials treated thereby, to be hereinafter described.

In carrying my invention into efiect, the base radical of the compound or compounds, which I prefer to use, may be a rare earth metal or a rare element, such as, thorium, thallium, cerium, lanthanum, didygnium, yttrium, titanium, zirconium or uranium, while the acid radical o1eic,1inoleic, linolenic, clupanodonic, abietic, cocceric, ricinoleic, dioxystearic, japanic, chaulmoogric, resin or gum-acid series.

The material to be treated may be protected by impregnating, otherwise applying a layer of a com ound type indicated a ove.

The impregnation of the material may be efiected by the following, amongst other, methods.

I.- Simple impregnation b the compound in a true solution or by a co loidal or quasicolloidal solution or suspension in an organic solvent.

11. Impregnation by an emulsion of the compound.

III. Depositing the compound or insoluble 50 rare earth metal or rare element soap, by first protective covering or or compounds of the a soluble soap or salt of the organic acid.

may be of the fatty,

covering, incorporating or and in Great Britain mm 14, i924.

impregnating the material with a solution of a soluble soap or salt of the or anic acid and then treating with a solution 0% a soluble salt 7 of the rare earth metal or rare element.

IV. Depositing the compound or insoluble rare earth metal or rare element soap, by first impregnating the material with a solution of a soluble salt of the rare earth metal or rare element and then treating with a solution of V. Depositing the compound, by first imso pregnating the material with a carbonate or hydroxide of the rare earth metal or rare element and then treating with the organic acid, or vice versa.

The material may be covered with a protective la er by painting, spraying or otherwise app ing the followings 1. A so ution of the compound in any suitable solvent which will evaporate leaving a thin layer of the protective compound.

2. A water or other emulsion or suspension of the protective compound, which, on evaporatior, leaves a deposit of the protective compoun 3. A deposit of the protective compound or insoluble rare earth metal or rare element soapor compound, by first covering or coating the material with a solution of a soluble soap or salt of the or anic acid and then treating with a solution 0 a soluble salt of the rare earth metal or rare element.

4. A deposit of the protective compound or insoluble rare earth metal or rare element soap or compound, by first covering or coatin the material with a solution of a soluble sa t of the rare earth metal or rare element and then treatin with a solution of a soluble soap or salt of the organic acid.

5. A deposit of the protective compound, by first impregnating or mixing the material with a carbonate or hydroxide of the rare earth metal or rare element and then treating with the organic acid, or vice versa.

The compounds or soaps of the higher organic acids with a rare earth metal or rare element may be made by any of the following methods A. Heating or fusing together the proper proportions of organic acid with an oxide, 100

'- soluble soap by treating a solution of a soluble soap or salt of the or anic acid with a solution of a soluble salt the rare earth metal orrare element, the insoluble compound being then separated by filtration or extraction with an immiscible solvent. C. Precipitation of the compound or 1nsoluble soap by treating a solution of a soluble salt .of the rare earth metal or rare element witha solution of a soluble soap or salt of the preparing the protective compoundsas above described from pure organic acids of the series set forth above, mixtures of these acids or their compounds or salts may be used, using as'a source of these organic nstead of acids or mixtures of organic acids or comabove described, I may,

pounds, the raw materials in which they occur, such as, oils, fats, waxes, gums or resins. Further, isomers, polymers, substitution products, oxidation and reduction products, hydration and dehydration products and other chemical modifications of these organic I acids or compounds not destroying the acid 'nature of the product, may be used.

For exam le:'

(1). Elai ic acid (made by the action 0 trous acid on oleic acid) may be used as the orgalzlic acid portion of the protective comoun P (2). The mixed acids or compounds in hydrogenated castor oil may be used as the orgaizlic acid portion of the protective comoun a p (3). The acids or acid compounds in oxidized orblown tung oil may be used as the orgalk lic acid portion of the protective comun (4). The acids in chlorinated cotton seed oil or the like may be used as the organic acid portion of the protective compound.

In general, thecompounds prepared from the saturated higher fatty acids are relatively insoluble in the ordinary organic solvents, whereas those prepared from the unsaturated higher fatty acids are relatively soluble in the ordinary organic solvents.

Instead of using a single compound as in some cases, use a mixture of two or more of these compounds to form the protective layer or covering or deposit.

My invention may be applied to fabrics, yarns, wood, metal, timber, paper, green or dead vegetable matter, hides, skins, leather, feathers, hair, fur and the like and also to live vegetation and plants, for preserving them and rendering them resistant to attack by insects, worms, molluscs and other animals, including fresh and salt water. species as well as fungi, moulds, mildews, rots and the like, and also vegetable growths, includ rate in benzol.

the fabric with a hot dium stearate,

ing algae, mosses, lichens, and fresh and salt water vegetation.

My invention may also be a plied to stone and other materials used in building construction.- v 4 p The following are typical'examples of the application of my invention:

a. Woollen fabrics ma be protected from attack by clothes moths, y impregnating the fabric with a- 1% solution of lanthanum steab, Woollen fabrics may be grotected from attack by clothes moths, by rst saturating then wringing out'and drying, thereafter passing through a warm 4% solution of cerium chloride after which the fabric is passed through warm clear water to remove any excess of the cerium salt.

e. Roofing timbers may be protected from, attack by clothes moths, by impregnating the fabric with-a solution of thorium oleate in white spirit.

d: Woollen rugs may be protected from attack by carpet beetles or the like, by spraying or dipping with a 5 solution of tatanium abietate.

e. Roofing timbers may be protected from attack. by death-watch beetles, by painting with a 5% solution of thorium kaurolate (thorium salt of kauri gum acid) in carbon tet 1% of mixed rare earth metal carbonates is incorporated with the board is made. When nished the wallboard is sprayed with a 10% solution of raw linseed oil in white spirit.

k. Timber piling for immersion in sea water may be protected from attack my marine animals and vegetation by impregnating or painting with the following mixture:

' Pounds Crude mineral oil 21 Pale gloss oil 36 Benzol 30 Grinding japan 30 Thorium tungate 6 Cerium oleate 6 z'. Foliage and flowers of growing roses may be'protected from attack by rose leaf roller caterpillars, by spraying with a water emulsion-of cerium ricinoleate.

Woollen and other treated with 1/10% to 1% solutions of the compounds herein described are not changed fabrics or yarns when 1%% solution of sov ulp before the wall- 105- g. In the manufacture of paper wallboard, i

'may

organisms as substantially in their physical characteristics, such as, flexibility, appearance and ability to absorb moisture, so that such fabrics may be worn in contact with the skin without causing irritation or other harmful effect.

Also in the case of example d given above no substantial change in the absorbent character of the fabric is produced after treatment.

In addition to the protective elfect above described, the organic acid rare earth metal or rare element compounds also possess definite insecticidal and fungicidal value, acting in some cases as contact poisons and in other cases as stomach poisons, and for this purpose may be used in solution inorganic solvents or in emulsion form in water.

Further these compounds may be used as or in anti-fouling paints and compositions for both timber and metal.

Materials not necessarily of vegetable or animal origin, such as building materials, e. g. plaster, wallboard or asbestos board, which are subject to attack by insects, animals or lower forms of life, and which are frequently attacked by termites, ants and rodents, also be rendered proof against these pests by treating the materials with protective compounds as set forth above.

A valuable feature of these compounds is their insolubility and hence their resistance to removal by rain or washing.

' By means of my invention, materials of the classes indicated above may protected against attack by insects, animals and other destructive agents or In the claims appended hereto, I have used the term anti-pest to define a composition which protects materials treated therewith so as to render them resistant to attack by, or repellant to, animals, insects, vegetation and hereinbefore indicated.

I claim 1. An anti-pest composition including a compound having as a base radical rare earth metals and as an acid radical higher organic acids, the compound being concentrated to a degree to prevent interference with the normal absorptive character of the material to '-=*hicl1 the composition is applied.

2. An anti-pest composition including a compound having as a base radical one of the group comprising thallium, yttrium or titanium, and as an acid radical higher organic acids, said compound being concentrated to a degree to avoid interfering with the absorptive character of the material to which the composition is applied.

3. An anti-pest composition including a compound having as a base radical rare earth metals and as an acid radical fatty acids, said compound being concentrated to a degree to avoid interfering with the absorptive character of thematerial to which the composition is applied.

be effectively I organisms.

4. An anti-pest composition including a compound having as a base radical one of the group comprising thallium, yttrium or titanium, and as an acid radical fatty acids, said compound being concentrated to a degree to avoid interfering with the absorptive character of the material to which the composition is applied.

5. A textile material impregnated with a composition including a compound having as a base radical one of the group comprising thallium, yttrium or titanium and as an acid radical higher organic acids, the composition being applied in such concentration of the compound or compounds as to avoid interfering with the normal absorptive character of the textile material.

6. An anti-pest composition, including a compound having as a base radical, one of the group containing thallium, yttrium or titanium, and as an acid radical higher organic acids.

7. An anti-pest composition, including a compound having as a base radical one of the group comprising thallium, yttrium or titanium, and as an acid radical fatty acids. In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.

SYDNEY WILMER KENDALL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2455886 *Mar 10, 1944Dec 7, 1948Sayles Finishing Plants IncMethod of rendering textile material water repellent, and the product
US2482816 *Jun 8, 1943Sep 27, 1949Nat Lead CoMethod of waterproofing textiles with zirconyl compounds
US3140913 *Aug 15, 1962Jul 14, 1964Koppers Co IncWood coated with a benzanthroneacridine used as a woodpecker repellent
US4576801 *Dec 20, 1983Mar 18, 1986Bruce J. MorrisonPesticidal sheets or containers
US4957939 *Jun 20, 1986Sep 18, 1990Schering AktiengesellschaftSterile pharmaceutical compositions of gadolinium chelates useful enhancing NMR imaging
US5154764 *Oct 3, 1991Oct 13, 1992Mooney Chemicals, Inc.Neodymium carboxylates as driers in high-solids coating compositions
US7686976Oct 26, 2007Mar 30, 2010Molycorp Minerals, LlcComposition for removing arsenic from aqueous streams
US8066874Oct 31, 2007Nov 29, 2011Molycorp Minerals, LlcApparatus for treating a flow of an aqueous solution containing arsenic
US8252087Oct 31, 2007Aug 28, 2012Molycorp Minerals, LlcProcess and apparatus for treating a gas containing a contaminant
US8349764Oct 31, 2007Jan 8, 2013Molycorp Minerals, LlcComposition for treating a fluid
US8475658Nov 2, 2009Jul 2, 2013Molycorp Minerals, LlcWater purification device for arsenic removal
US8557730Mar 29, 2012Oct 15, 2013Molycorp Minerals, LlcComposition and process for making the composition
US9233863Mar 28, 2012Jan 12, 2016Molycorp Minerals, LlcRare earth removal of hydrated and hydroxyl species
US20110002971 *Jul 6, 2010Jan 6, 2011Molycorp Minerals, LlcCeria for use as an antimicrobial barrier and disinfectant in a wound dressing
WO1984002447A1 *Dec 20, 1983Jul 5, 1984Lawrence John ParryPesticidal sheets or containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification442/125, 8/94.18, 424/617, 554/71, 514/492, 534/16, 554/72, 534/13, 424/404
Cooperative ClassificationA01N25/18