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Publication numberUS1741419 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 31, 1929
Filing dateDec 17, 1927
Priority dateJan 29, 1927
Publication numberUS 1741419 A, US 1741419A, US-A-1741419, US1741419 A, US1741419A
InventorsGeorge A Jones
Original AssigneeShoe Products Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe
US 1741419 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 31, 1929. G, A. JONES 1,741,419

SHOE

Filed Dec. 17, 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet l n U817 #01- Ge01gA.J01z gs JzzsAziiir Patented Dec. 31, 1929 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GEORGE A. JONES, 0F LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO SHOE PRODUCTS, INC., OF LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION OF MASSACHUSETTS SHOE The invention to be hereinafter described relates to shoes, and more particularly to a shoe Which is specially manufactured so that heel and metatarsal arch supporting cushions may be easily applied thereto.

Heretofore various devices have been applied to shoes for supporting the metatarsal arch of the foot, but so far as I am aware they have been expensive, diflicult to apply, and unsatisfactory. One of the purposes of the present invention, therefore, is to provide a shoe which is of usual construction with the exception of a simple unobjectionable change therein which enables heel and metatarsal arch supporting cushions or either of them to be quickly and easily applied to the shoe.

The character of the invention may be best understood by reference-to the following description of good forms thereof, shown in the accompanyingdrawings, and the proc ess of manufacturing the same.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of an insole having cushion locating and holding holes therein, and shows the slugs removed in punching the holes;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section through a portion of a mans shoe embodying the invention;

Fig. 3 is a bottom view of the heel cushion;

Fig. 4 is a bottom view of the metatarsal arch supporting cushion;

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal section through a portion of the shoe and showing the heel and metatarsal arch supporting cushions applied to the insole after removal of the slugs from the holes therein;

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section through a portion of a ladys turned shoe embodying the invention;

Figs. 7 and 8 are respectively perspective views of a shank and a fore part filler; and

Fig. 9 is a vertical section through a portion of the shoe shown in Fig. 6 and showing the heel and metatarsal arch supporting cushions applied to the shank and fore part filler respectively after removal of the slugs from the holes therein.

Referring to the drawings, 1 (Fig. 1) desig- Divided and this application filed December nates an insole having a hole 3 punched in the heel portion of the insole and a hole 5 punched in the ball portion of the insole, said holes being of general oval form and produced by punching out slugs 7 and 9 from the insole. These slugs are restored to or left in the holes in the insole, and may be held removably therein by Webs 11 and 13 of cloth or paper and having areas larger than the slugs and secured to the upper and lower surfaces of the insole by a suitable adhesive. The insole described above may be built into a shoe in the process of manufacturing the same. In this process the upper 15, counter 17 and insole may be lasted in the usual manner, and then the outsole may be applied. The hole in the heel portion of the insole is so located and of a size such that in punching the same it is directly above the cavity formed by the inturned margins 19 of the upper, counter and lining which are between the insole and the outsole. The hole in the ball portion of the insole is of an area and location such that it is in away from the inseam of the shoe. Thus the making of these holes in the insole does not have any destructive effect upon or weaken the shoe.

The heel cushion may be substantially the same as that disclosed in my copending applications Serial Nos. 156,927 and 156,928, both filed December 24:, 1926. It is made of high grade rubber and comprises a diaphragm 21 (Fig. 3) having a collar 23 projecting down from the bottom thereof and of oval shape and appropriate size to fit into the hole 3 in the insole. The diaphragm is substantially larger than the hole and has a marginal portion which rests upon the upper surface of the insole surrounding the hole. The construction of this diaphragm is such that when its collar is in the hole in the insole and the wearer of the shoe is walking, the diaphragm may flex up and down with pulsatile action, and will conform to the shape of the base of the heel of the wearer of the shoe. The oval shape of the hole and the collar of the cushion will prevent the diaphragm from turning out of its normal proper position. Also the collar in the hole will prevent any shifting of the diaphragm longitudinally or transversely of the insole.

The metatarsal arch supporting cushion may be substantially the same as disclosed in said application Serial No. 156,927. It is made of high grade rubber and comprises a diaphragm 25 (Fig. 4) having a collar 27 projecting down from the bottom thereof, said collar being of oval form and of proper size to-fit into the hole 5 in the ball portion of the insole. Projecting up from the diaphragm is a protuberance 29 (Fig. 5) which is suitably formed to furnish the proper sup port for the metatarsal arch of the foot. The diaphragm has a margin of substantial. area which rests upon the upper surface of the insole. Vhen the wearer is walking, the diaphragm and its protuberance are adapted to flex up and down with pulsatile action which will operate desirably to exercise and strengthen muscles of the foot and restore them to normal healthy condition, so that they will properly support the metatarsal arch of the foot.

The oval shape of the collar 23 of the arch supporting cushion and the oval shape of the hole 5 in the insole will prevent dislocation of the cushion from its proper position. It cannot shift longitudinally or transversely of the insole, and it cannot turn.

By my invention a shoe is provided of usual construction with the eXception that the slugs are punched from the insole and left and secured therein so that to outward ap pearances the shoe is not different from the ordinary shoe. Shoes thus manufactured and supplied to retailers will be in readiness toreceive the heel and metatarsal arch supporting cushions if a customer so desires.

n applying these cushions it is merely necessary to remove the slugs from the holes in the insole, present the heel and metatarsal arch supporting cushions to the insole and insert their collars into the holes. These are simple operations quickly and easily accomplished. The hole is so located in the ball portion of the insole that if a person is fitted with a shoe of correct size, the metatarsal arch supporting cushion will be properly located to furnish the desired support for the arch.

A shoe provided with these cushions can be worn as an ordinary shoe, since they do notproject into and occupy the space originally designed to receive the foot.

Goodyear welt, McKay, turned shoes and other types of shoes may be prepared to embody the presentinvention, in order that they may be adapted to receive the cushions described.

Referring now more particularly to Figs; 6 to 9, a ladys turned shoe is shown therein and comprises the upper 31, sole 33, heel 35,

shank 37 and. fore part filler The shank and the fore part filler have mating feathered ends 4:1and 13 which may be secured together by a staple. The hole 45 is made in the shank to receive the heel cushion, and the hole 47 is made in the fore part filler to receive the metatarsal arch supporting cushion. The shank and the fore part filler preferably have the holes punched therein before they are built into the shoe. The slugs 4-9 and 51 which are punched out in producing the shank hole and fore part filler hole, are left in their holes and are removably held therein by webs 53 and 55 of cloth or paper and having areas larger than the slugs and secured to the upper and lower surfaces of the shank and filler by suitable adhesive.

The cushions for application to the shank and the fore part filler may be similar to those described for the mans shoe, with the exception that the heel cushion necessarily would be made smaller and preferably its collar is of the same size as the collar of the metatarsal arch cushion. The holes 15 and 1-7 for receiving the collars preferably are made of the same size.

If the ladys shoe is constructed with a full length filler, it would be similar to the insole shown in Fig. 1, but shaped appropriately for a ladys shoe.

This application is a division from my application Serial No.- 164,465, filed January 29,1927, claiming the process disclosed herein, said application having resulted in Letters Patent No. 1,675,711, dated July 3, 1928.

The term insole employed in the claims is also to be regarded as generic to a full length filler and to a shank and fore part filler. v

It will be understood that the invention is not limited to the embodiment shown and that various deviations may be made therefrom without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claim.

I claim:

As an article of manufacture, a shoe comprising an upper, counter, insole, outsole and heel, said insole having cushion locating and holding holes punched therethrough at the heel and ball portions of the insole, the hole at the heel portion being within the inturned margins of the upper and counter, and the hole at the ball portion being in from the inseam, and readily removable slugs in said holes, above the outsole and having upper surfaces flush with the upper surface of the insole, said slugs being adapted to be removed that heel and metatarsal arch supporting cushions may be applied to said holes.

GEORGE A. JONES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2862313 *Jun 3, 1957Dec 2, 1958Canadian Footwear Res IncFabrication of differentially deformable insoles
US2863231 *Jan 17, 1958Dec 9, 1958Canadian Footwear Res IncFabrication of footwear having differentially deformable insoles
US3517928 *Jul 25, 1969Jun 30, 1970Gerard F ShanahanWeighted shoe
US4520580 *Mar 30, 1982Jun 4, 1985Brown Dennis NSkate boot insert
US4557060 *Jun 24, 1983Dec 10, 1985Mizuno CorporationInsole with exchangeable reliant pieces
US4800657 *Aug 25, 1986Jan 31, 1989Brown Dennis NVariably adjustable shoe insert
US4930232 *Mar 28, 1989Jun 5, 1990The United States Shoe CorporationMultilayer shoe sole
US5517770 *Mar 23, 1994May 21, 1996Libertyville Saddle Shop, Inc.Shoe insole
US5547620 *Apr 11, 1995Aug 20, 1996Guiotto; DinoMethod of manufacturing a footwear insole having an integrated comfort and support pad
US5561919 *Feb 14, 1994Oct 8, 1996Gill; YoramSandal having independenty adjustable straps
US5625965 *Jun 14, 1995May 6, 1997Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Stand easy shoe insert
US5951935 *Aug 27, 1997Sep 14, 1999Converse Inc.Method for making sock liner having resilient pads therein
US6038790 *Feb 26, 1998Mar 21, 2000Nine West Group, Inc.Flexible sole with cushioned ball and/or heel regions
US6408543May 18, 2000Jun 25, 2002Acushnet CompanyFootbed system with variable sized heel cups
US6460275 *Feb 28, 2001Oct 8, 2002W. Scott BennettOrthotic insert
US6474003Dec 28, 2001Nov 5, 2002Acushnet CompanyFootbed system with variable sized heel cups
US6502330 *May 25, 2000Jan 7, 2003Loic DavidSole for footwear
US6601320 *May 22, 2000Aug 5, 2003Northwest Podiatric LaboratoryOrthotic assembly having stationary heel post and separate orthotic plate
US7526880 *Aug 9, 2004May 5, 2009Norma Ellen PolcekCushioned insole
US8215037Feb 4, 2009Jul 10, 2012Nike, Inc.Footwear with plurality of interlocking midsole and outsole elements
US8978275Jun 12, 2012Mar 17, 2015Nike, Inc.Footwear with plurality of interlocking midsole and outsole elements
US9055781 *Jun 19, 2012Jun 16, 2015Varithotics Co., Ltd.Body balance device
US20040261291 *Nov 26, 2003Dec 30, 2004Paek Sang KyunShoe sole having a non-flat surface for accommodating the non-flat undersurface of a foot resting on the sole
US20060026867 *Aug 9, 2004Feb 9, 2006Polcek Norma ECushioned insole
US20100005566 *Jan 14, 2010Gabe Daniel BOrthopedic support sock
US20100170107 *Oct 8, 2009Jul 8, 2010Tzeng Tzann-YuhPlantar balancer
US20100192415 *Feb 4, 2009Aug 5, 2010Nike, IncFootwear with plurality of interlocking midsole and outsole elements
US20120255199 *Jun 19, 2012Oct 11, 2012Tzeng Tzann-YuhBody balance device
US20130312280 *Feb 9, 2012Nov 28, 2013Roy GardinerDynamic arch stabilization and rehabilitative shoe insole device
USD383894Dec 22, 1995Sep 23, 1997Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc.Insole
USD739133 *May 28, 2014Sep 22, 2015Young Ho JungShoe insole
WO1997000030A1 *Jun 6, 1996Jan 3, 1997Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Stand easy shoe insert
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/145, 36/37, D02/961, 36/43
International ClassificationA43B7/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/14, A43B7/1445
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20M, A43B7/14