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Publication numberUS1742497 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1930
Filing dateJan 15, 1925
Priority dateJan 15, 1925
Publication numberUS 1742497 A, US 1742497A, US-A-1742497, US1742497 A, US1742497A
InventorsDickinson Fairleigh S
Original AssigneeDickinson Fairleigh S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hypodermic syringe
US 1742497 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 7, 1930. DlcKlNsoN 1,742,497

HYPODERMIC SYRINGE Filed Jan. l5, l1925 2 Sheets-Sheet l w/mess l IML/Enron Ell/RL mf/5. Bmx/50N 'Z' L CWI/ema zer fw? I NTU/Mfrs Jan. 7, 19310.

F'. S. DCKNSON HYPODERMIC SYRINGE Filed Jan.' 15, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet WITNESS W A TTURNEYS Patented Jan. 7, 1930 UNITED f sTA'rss HYEODERMIG SYBINGE Application tiled January 15, 1925. Serial No. 2,706.

The invention relates to surgical instruments of the kind generally known as hypodermic syringes and has for its ob'ect to provide means for` establishing a relia le connection between the needle and the barrel. The invention, by means of which this result is obtained, involves a needle member as well as a novel structure ofthe barrel member. Advantages of the invention will be referred hto hereinafter.

Although the invention is obviously capable of numerous other forms, I have illustrated preferred embodiments thereof in the accompanying drawings in which Fig. l is an elevation of the new syringe; Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view approximately on line 2-2 of Fig. l; Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view approximately on line of Fig. 2 Fig. 4 is a perspective view of thefneedle shown in Fig. l; Fig. 5 is a side view showing the needle resting upon a fiat surface; Fig. 6 is a sectional view on the line 6 6 of Fig. 5 looking in the direction of the arrow; Fig. T is a sectional View similar to Fig. 2 showing another form of the invention; Fig. 8 is a detail perspective view of the metal sleeve of the barrel member iii the form shown iii Fig. 7, and Fig. 9 is a fragmentary section similar to 2 illustratin still another form of the invention.

Referring to the accompanying drawing by numerals, l indicates a syringe preferably made of glass and which is provided with a discharge nozzle 2 tapering on the outer surface so as to readily receive the hub 3 of the needle Il. Heretofore needles have been provided with hubs having bores similar to the bore 4L of hub 3 so as to be readily slipped upon the nozzle Z and held thereon by friction. il slip joint of this character is very desirable as it provides a good contact between the metal hub and the glass nozzle and holds the needle steady and prevents theentrance of air. lVhen, however, the needle is used with the syringe and depends only upon friction for holding the same in place as has been the practice heretofore. it has been found thaty the syringe frequently becomes separated from the needle during the operation thereof, particularly where a comparatively heavy fluid is being forced through the needle. This is extremely objectionable and often dangerous as for 'example where the surgeon, as a result of such se aration cannot be sure of the exact amount ofduid that he has forced .through the needle into the patient.

' Nevertheless, although such defects of eiristing structures have been recognized, no satisfactory remedy has thus far been found.

.This is in part due to the fact that the needle member may not be fastened in any permanent or troublesomely detachable manner to the barrel member but must, at all times, be easily and conveniently separable at will and replaceable by a new needle.

The new invention overcomes all the difiy culties and disadvantages of the prior constructions while at the same time retaining all of the advantages thereof. These results are brought about by constructing the needle member so that, while it` still may 4be efficiently utilized in connection with the barrel Y members of existing syringes ofthe indicated place in any suitable manner upon the syringe, the method of attachment being such as to withstand separation' of the parts under any ordinary conditions to which the syringe is subjected. A preferred method of accom--A plishing this result `is to malte the collar 5a of the metal sleeve 5 slightly smaller in internal dimension than the exterior dimension of the ground glass nozzle 2 at its point of connection with said collar 5, then heating the latter and in its heated coiidit.on slipping it upon the relatively cool nozzle i2 whereupon as the metal cools a practically i permanent connection will be established between the metal sleeve 5* and the glass nozzle 2. The process by which this is accomplished is embodied in a separate application Serial No. 2,705, filed January 15, 1925.

.There are other methods of making a proper connection between the sleeve 5 and the syringe 1 but for the purposes of the present case any such connection is the equivalent of the preferred connection above set forth. The'hub 3 of the needle is of substantially the usual size and provided with the usual bore 4*, and at that end which is contiguous to the needle 4 is formed with one or more flattened portions or faces 6. Near its opposite end, the hub is provided with one or more faces 7 which as shown may comprise flattened portions on an upstanding flange 8 which in such case is divided into two sections by the flattened or reduced portions 7. The flange 8 is comparatively thin and the two sections thereof which form projecting portions 8 on diametrically opposite sides of the hub, are substantially arc-shaped and each occupy about one-fourth of the complete flange. These projecting portions 8 constitute an example of the means on 'the needle whereby unintentional separation from the syrinfre barrel 1 is prevented by cooperation with a co-action means on the locking sleeve 5; thus in the illustrated exam -le said projecting portions 8 act as inter ocking cams with the respective spiral cams 9 and 10 arranged interiorly of the locking sleeve 5. The spiral cams 9 and 10 may be termed threads though the action is that of spiral cams, there being two cams to accommodate the two portions 8 which interlock with the cams for holding the hub 3 in substantially the position shown in Fig. 2. It will be understood that other means whereby the needle is connected with the syringe barrel in an equivalent manner so as to be easily detachable and attachable at will and so as to be fixed against unintentional separation may be substituted for the projecting portions 8 and the spiral cams 9 and 10. That is to say, any type of devices which cooperate to fix the needle in place in a manner to resist forces developed by the syringe when in use and exerted in a direction parallel with the surface engagement of the needle barrel with the nozzle 2 are within the purview of my claims. lVhen the needle 4 is not in use, it may rest on a supporting surface with one of the flattened faces 7 and the corresponding face 6 positioned in engagement with said supporting surface whereby the needle 4 will be held at an upward inclination with its point elevated for an a preciable distance above the support as s iown in Fig. 5. In combining the needle member with the barrel member, the hub is' gripped and forced onto the nozzle 2l by a gentle rotation of the hub. The spiral cams 9 and 10 are spaced a sufficient distance apart to permit the hub to freely rotate until it begins to frictionally engage the outer surface of the nozzle 2 whereupon a final rotation of the hub with very little forward movement will cause the cam portions 8 ofthe needle member to engage the spiral cams 9 and 10 and act to assure a final perfection of fit and at the same time locking the hub in its perfectly seated condition against accidental removal or accidental loosening. The final rotation of the hub and the resultant cam action between the projections8 and the spiral cams 9 andI 10 jams the parts together so that uncoupling by reverse rotation is resisted to an extent suflicient to prevent unseating of the cams in the ordinary operation of the syringe or unless a special effort sufficient to overcome the res1stance is made. At the same time the cou ling is not so resistant as to prevent uncoup ing with great ease by a simple manual operation applied by grippin the needle hub between two fingers of oneiand and the barrel with the other hand and imparting reverse rotative movements to these elements. The sleeve 5 in addition to acting as a locking sleeve or member for the hub 3, protects and tends to keep clean the outer surface of the tip ornozzle 2. Even in an exceptional case where the frictional en` f gagement between the tip or nozzle 2 and the hub 3 fails accidentally to be established or a separation takes place from any cause, the cam portions or members 8. will nevertheless co-act with the spiral cams 9 and 10 to hold the hub against disengagement so that the surgeon may without impediment complete the operation of injecting the fluid into the patient.

In cases where it is desired to provide means for speciall treating the nozzle with cleansing or disin ecting fluids, the sleeve `5 'nsl may be apertured at one or more points as indicated at 11 in Fig. 8. Fig. 7 also illustrates a form of the invention thus far described specially applicable to such cases where lon or heavy needles are involved as for examp e in tonsil operations, veterinary surgery, etc. In such cases the nozzle 2, as shown in Fi 1, frequently roves too fragile to endure t e strains deveijoped during use and breaks from the barrel 1. To avoid this contingency and nevertheless retain the benefits 'of this invention, the glass nozzle 2a is not employed as the co-acting member for the tapered hub of the needle but is made heavy and strong as indicated in Fig. 7 The metal collar 5b is then fitted upon the nozzle 2a in the manner previously described, while the interior of the metal sleeve structure 5c is developed as an exteriorly tapered nozzle 2b corresponding approximately in outer dimensions with the nozzle 2 of Fig. 2. The same needle which has been used for Fig. 2 can be used with the structure of Fig. 7 and in the same manner as described with reference to Fig. 2, the locking projections 8 engaging with the spiral cams 9a and 10a of F ig. 7 and seating the needle hub correctly and in locked position upon the metal nozzle 2".

In order to avoid an open space between the forward edge of the glass part 2a and the face 5 of the metal sleeve 5c it is recommended that in putting the parts together a suitable solder be used at this point; after the parts have been united any solder that has flowed into or clogged the bore of the fluid passage is easily removable by inserting a drill or other suitable instrument through the forward end of the nozzle.

In the form of the invention shown in Fig. 9, the lass nozzle 2c similar to the nozzle 2 of Fig. extends from the barrel 1 as an integral partthereof and is continued in the form of a tapering nozzle 2d for the reception of the needle hub 3 as in Fig. 2. A metal collar 5d similar to the collar 5b of Fig. 7 is secured upon the nozzle 2 in the manner previously described and is continued as a sleeve 5E which surrounds the tapering nozzle 2d as in the previous forms. The sleeve 5 is constructed interiorly to cooperate with the needle for holding the latter in place as hereinbefore set forth. With the arrangement shown in Fig. 9, the glass nozzle comprises a base sectionof maximum strength and a tapering section projecting therefrom so that the danger of breakage of the glass nozzle 2C--2d at its point of connection with the barrel l is reduced to a minimum. This is due to the fact that the nozzle 2c is of re1- atively large diameter and heavy construction and thus capable of withstanding more or less severe strains.

It will be seen that the new needle can be proved construction wherein the desirable and beneficial action of the slip joint is retained while at the same time means are presented which will positively lock the needle against slipping off of the syringe when under pressure. The sleeve structure of the new barrel construction is so designed. on the other hand` that it will accommodate any standard existing needle.

So far' as the n eedle member is concerned, it will be seen that a. plurality of finger grips are presented which act in the double capacitv of finger grips and means for holding the discharge end of the needle from contact with a surface on --which it may rest or be mounted, while having also permanent means to adapt the needle to be used with equal facility with a lain glass syringe and with a syringe provi ed with the novel cooperating member above described. The needle member as such and its novel features constitute the subject o'f a separate divisional application.

A further feature of the invention is that it provides a co-acting needle and lock in connection with the nozzle of a syringe whereby the hub of the needle may be forced on the tapering nozzle and be made to firmly engage the same by friction and at the same time become interlocked with the locking member secured to the syringe so that accidental loosening of the needle will not cause its removal from the syringe.

It will also be observed that the relation between the sleeve and barrel is such as to avoid having the metal roj ect over the sides of the barrel, thus avoi ing any obstruction to the complete observation of the entire interior of the barrel.-

Various changes in the s eciiic form shown and described may be ma e within the sco e of the claims without departing from tiie spirit of my invention.

What I claim is:

1. The combination comprising a syringe, a tapering tip associated with said syringe, a needle provided with a hub adapted to frictionally engage said tip, a sleeve carrying element rigidly associated with and supported from said syringe, and a sleeve projecting y,from the sleeve-carrying element formed with interlocking members in radially spaced relation to the outer surface of said tip and interlocking with said hub for preventing accidental disengagement thereof.

2. The combination comprising a syringe,

a tip'associated with said syringe, a sleevecarrying element rigidly associa-ted with and supported from said syringe, a sleeve projecting from the sleeve-carrying element in the saine direction as the tip, and vin radially spaced relation thereto and formed with an 'interlocking member and a needle provided with a hub adapted to fit said tip and to removably interlock with said interlocking y, member of the sleeve in the final seating of .provided with a hub telescopicallylitting over said tip and having outwardly extenfing webs interlocking with said spiral cams to lock the needle against accidental disenggement. Y

-lllti 4. The combination comprising a syringe, a tapering tip associated With said syringe, a needle adapted to telescope over said tip and frictionally engage the same, said needle having laterally extending members on the hub, a sleeve-carrying element rigidly associated with and supported from said syringe, and a sleeve projecting from the sleeve-carrying element and provided With a pair of spiral cams, said cams being spaced apart to prcsent spirally arranged grooves in which said laterally extending members of the hub of the needle are adapted to move as said hub is forced onto said tip.

5. A syringe having a discharge orifice, a sleeve-carrying element rigidly associated with and supported from the syringe, a sleeve projecting from the sleeve-carrying element, a rigid tapered nozzle the duct of which constitutes an extension of the discharge orifice of the syringe While its outer tapered surface is arranged for receiving the hub of a needle, said nozzle being integral With the sleeve-carrying element and surrounded by the sleeve thereof, and means on the sleeve adapted to cooperate with said needlehub to hold the same in frictional engagement with the tapered nozzle and to lock the same in position.

6. A syringe having a discharge orifice, a sleeve-carrying element rigidly associated with and supported from the syringe, a sleeve projecting from said sleeve-carrying element, a rigid nozzle the duct of which constitutes an extension of the discharge orifice of the syringe while its outer tapered surface is shaped to receive thehub of a needle, said nozzle being integral With the sleeve-carrying element and surrounded by the sleeve thereof, a needle having a `hub adapted to fit said nozzle and provided with means to cooperate With means on the sleeve and means on said sleeve cooperating with saidy means on the hub to hold said hub in frictional engagement with the nozzle extension and to lock said hub in position thereon.

7. In a device of the character described, a locking sleeve adapted to be connected with a syringe, comprising a tubular portion for engaging the syringe, and a portion extending therefrom provided with a plurality of internally positioned spiral cams. said sleeve being provided with peripheral apertures through which a cleansing or disinfecting fluid maybe introduced to the interior of said sleeve.

8. In a hypodermic syringe, the combination of a glass barrel, an integral nozzle of relatively large diameter projecting from yone end thereof, a second nozzle projecting from said first nozzle, adapted to frictionally engage the interior of the hub of a needle, and of less diameter than the first nozzle at the needle-hub-engaging portion of said second nozzle, a. metal collar fitted upon said first nozzle and a sleeve projecting from said collai` and permanently surrounding said second nozzle ata distance for fixing a needle thereon against removal.

9. The combination with a syringe having a nozzle, ot' a needle adapted to lit over said nozzle, a locking sleeve fixed to said syringe and partially enclosing said nozzle, and interlocking cam means on said needle and said sleeve for fixedly holding the needle in pos sition, said sleeve being provided with peripheral apertures through which a cleansing fluid may be introduced.

10. The combination with a syringe having a nozzle associated therewith, a needle member adapted to telescope over said nozzle to be held in position thereon by frictional engageinent, a sleeve-carrying element fixed to said syringe, a sleeve projecting from the sleeve-carrying element, threaded means on the interior of said sleeve and means on the needle member coacting with said threaded means for forcing the needle member onto the nozzle and for holding the needle member fixedly in position thereon.

l1. A. syringe having a tip, a sleeve secured thereto, said sleeve being provided with a tapered nozzle constituting an extension of the tip of the syringe and being adapted to frictionally engage the interior otl the hub of a needle, and, threaded means on the sleeve adapted to cooperate with said needle hub to hold the same in frietional engagement with said nozzle.

12. The combination with a syringe having a tip, of a locking sleeve carried by said tip and provided with atapered nozzle, communicating with said syringe and adapted to frictionally engage the interior of the hub of a needle, said sleeve being also provided with peripheral apertures through which a cleansing or disinfecting fluid may be introduced to flush the interior of the sleeve and the exterior of said nozzle.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand.

FAIRLEIGH S. DICKINSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2656836 *Sep 26, 1950Oct 27, 1953Bishop & Co Platinum Works JHypodermic syringe
US2757672 *May 7, 1953Aug 7, 1956Ogle Robert WSyringe
US3509880 *Mar 13, 1969May 5, 1970Guttman Yolan RIntravenous needle hub construction
US4296949 *Aug 6, 1979Oct 27, 1981Abbott LaboratoriesRotatable connecting device for I.V. administration set
US4735441 *Mar 6, 1987Apr 5, 1988Hewlett-Packard CompanyNon-loosening luer nut
US4788986 *Mar 16, 1987Dec 6, 1988Harris Jim CHolder for blood collecting needle
US4824641 *Jun 20, 1986Apr 25, 1989Cetus CorporationSample carrier and pipette tips
US5503627 *May 9, 1994Apr 2, 1996Bioject, Inc.Ampule for needleless injection
US5624402 *Dec 12, 1994Apr 29, 1997Becton, Dickinson And CompanySyringe tip cap
US5807338 *Oct 20, 1995Sep 15, 1998United States Surgical CorporationModular trocar system and methods of assembly
US5980493 *Aug 25, 1998Nov 9, 1999United States Surgical CorporationModular trocar system and methods and assembly
US5993412 *May 19, 1997Nov 30, 1999Bioject, Inc.Injection apparatus
US6027482 *Apr 28, 1997Feb 22, 2000Becton Dickinson And CompanySyringe tip cap
US6190364Aug 24, 1999Feb 20, 2001Becton, Dickinson And CompanySyringe tip cap
US6196998Nov 24, 1998Mar 6, 2001Becton Dickinson And CompanySyringe and tip cap assembly
US6520935Aug 22, 2000Feb 18, 2003Becton, Dickinson And CompanySyringe and tip cap assembly
US7798993Aug 3, 2005Sep 21, 2010Becton, Dickinson And CompanySingle use syringe
US8202257Sep 30, 2005Jun 19, 2012Becton, Dickinson And CompanySplatter prevention mechanism for a syringe
US8479370Feb 25, 2011Jul 9, 2013Cook Medical Technologies LlcMethod of preventing inadvertent interconnection in medical systems using adapter
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/242, 285/272, 285/332
International ClassificationA61M5/34
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/347, A61M5/344
European ClassificationA61M5/34C