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Publication numberUS1743867 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1930
Filing dateApr 27, 1927
Priority dateApr 27, 1927
Publication numberUS 1743867 A, US 1743867A, US-A-1743867, US1743867 A, US1743867A
InventorsMalic Poole Foster
Original AssigneeBrown Instr Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pyrometer well
US 1743867 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 14, 1930. M O LE 1,743,867

' PYROMETER WELL Filed April 27, 1927 I NIOR F0570? P0045 M ATTORNEY Patented Jan. 14, 1930 UNITED ST T PATENT OFFICE FOSTER 'MALIC POOLE, OF TULSA, OKLAHOMA, ASSIGNOR TO THE BROWN INSTRUMENT COMPANY, OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, A CORPORATION OF PENNSYL- VANIA PYROME'I'ER WELL Application filed April 27, 1927. Serial No. 182200;.

The general object of the present invention is to provide a pyrometer housing or well of improved construction. More speclfically, the object of my invention is to provide a pyrometer housingor well especially adapted for use in high pressure oil and steam l1nes and characterized by the formation of different parts of such difierent materials that each part may have properties suitable for its use under the. operating-conditions to which 1t is subjected. v

The various features of novelty wh ch characterize my invention are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming'a part of this specificat1on. For

a better understanding of the invention, however, and the advantages possessed by t reference should be had to the accompanymg drawings and descriptive matter in which I have illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the invention.

The figure in the drawing is a view. with parts broken awav and in section of one embodiment of my invention. In'the embodiment of my invention illustrated in the drawing the pyrometer housing or well proper consists of a hollow head portion C and an elongated tubular body portion B. The head C' is screwed into a threaded opening A in the wall of a tube or chamber A into which the body B extends. As shown the outer end of the head C is enlarged and-made hexa onal in form to facilitate its adjustment y a wrench or other suitable tool. The head C is formed with a central opening C having a threaded section at its outer end. Secured in the inner end of the opening C is the tube- B which is closed at its inner end. Projecting from the outer end of the headis a tube D havin one end secured in the threaded section of the opening 0 and its opposite end secured in a central opening in the lower portion of a terminal head Arranged within and coaxial with the tubes C and D is an elongated refractory tube E open at both ends and having its outer end secured in the terminal head E. The refractory tube E is slightly spaced from the tube B and is arranged with its outer end spaced from the closed end of the tube B. A thermocouple E extends through the refractory tube E and has its hot junction projecting from the inner end of the tube E to a point adjacent the closed end of In accordancewith the present invention, I

form the head C of a material having a thermal coefficient of expansion at least as high and preferably higher than that of the .material of the wall A to insure a tight joint between the head C and the wall of the opening A under all conditions of operation, and I form the protecting tube B of a materialmore highly resistant to corrosion and high temperatures than any available material having a thermal coeflieient of expansion as high as the material from which the head C may be made. In oil still apparatus for which my invention is especially suitable the high pressures and temperatures existing in operation ordinarily require that the tubes and chamber walls of the apparatus beconstructed of steel. For such use, I ordinarily form the head 0 of aluminum bronze, which has a higher coefiicient of expansion than steel and form the protecting tube B of a chromiumiron' alloy known as stainless iron or ascoloy, which has a lower coeflicient of expansion than steel or aluminum bronze, but is highly resistant to the corrosive action of hot oil or steam and high temperatures, is of high thermal conductivity and is strong so that the tube B may have thin walls even when exposed to high external pressure.

In prior constructions, pyrometer housing or wells have been made of'various materials.

vIn particular, they have been made entirely cient of expansion of the ascoloy as compared with steel, it is necessary to tighten up the well as the highertemperatures are reached.

When the still cools down and it is desired to remove the well for cleaning, the wall through which the well extends contracts more than 1 the ascoloy well and the well becomes frozen in and c 'be removed only with great difficulty. In ordinary use, particularly in oil heating apparatus, freq uent removals of the pyrometer well are required for tube and well wall cleaning and for other purposes.

With a material having a higher coeflicient of expansion than steel, the .well ma be inserted in osition' whencold and w en the wall A is heated up, the connection becomes tighter owing to the greater expansion of the head 0 than the wall A. V on cooling down,

the well can easily be removed, as the well head C contracts more than the wall A: It

is essential to successfiil operation of a tube still that the connection between the py- 26 rometer well and the pipe be very tight to prevent leakage of oil with resulting waste.

and danger of fire. In practical operation no material has been found having a hi her coeflicient of expansion than steel and a so hav-.

30 ing suflicient resistance to corrosion and the strength and refractory properties required W for commercial construction and use as a protectmg tube.

Since the protecting tube B and the head are formed of metals having differentrates of expansion, it is necessary that those parts he so connected that there will be no prac-.

tical possibility of the parts loosening under the conditions of use to which the apparatus 40 is subjected. In the construction illustrated the protecting tube ,is shown as inserted in and welded to the head portion C.

The parts maybe connected however,- by

shrinking the head on the open end of the 46 protecting tube. In such case, the head 0 is first heated, and after the tube B is inserted 1n the opening C',-the head is allowed to cool thereby forming a very tight connection between the parts. If the normal operation of the still ap aratus requires a temperature not higher t an 900; F., and if with this construction the parts areso proportioned that the head C must be heated to 1000 F. to get it'on the tube B, then the joint betweenthe parts will be secure under all normal operating temperatures. With the headO thus shrunk on the tube 13 additional security may be had by welding the parts together at the outer end of the joint between them.

r My invention is. characterized by the si1nplicity of the construction and the elfectivenessof the apparatus when used. lVith the materials used, the parts perform their normal functions more efliciently' for a longer commercial period than is the case with the ap aratus heretofore employed. EVhile in accordance with-the provisions of the statutes, I have illustrated and described in some casescertainfeatures of my inven tion may be used to advantage wlthout a 'corres onding use of other features.

aving now described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1 1. A pyrometer well comprising a head adapted to be secured in an opening in the wall of a container and made of a material having a relatively high thermal coeflicient of expansion and an e ongated tube ortion secured to said head and formed 0 a material having a lower coeflicient of expansion than the material of the container, but which is more highl resistant to corrosion than the head materia 2. A pyrometer well ada ted for use in a container for a fluid under 'gh temperature and pressure comprising a head portion ada ted to be seated in an opening in the al of the container and made of metal having a higher thermal coefiicient of expansion than the metal of the container wall and an elongated tube portion secured to said head and formed of a metal having. a lower thermal coeflicient of expansion than the metal of the container wall and more hFhly resistant to the corrosive action of the aid and high temperatures than the metal of said head portion.

8. A pyrometer well ada ted for use in a container for a fluid under igh temperature and pressure comprisinga threaded head portion adapted to be secured in an opening in the wall of the container and made of metal having .a higher thermal coeflicient of expansion than the metal of the container wall and an elongated tube portion secured to said head and formed of a metal having a lower thermal coefli'cient of expansion than the metal of the container wall and more highly resistant to corrosion and high temperatures than the metal of said hea walh 4. A pyrometer'well adapted for use in a container for a fluid under high temperature and pressure comprising analuminum bronze head portion adapted to be secured in position in the wall of said container and an elongated tube portion" secured to saidhead formed of a metal having a lower thermal-coeflicient of expansion than the material of the container wall and more highly resistant to corrosion and high temperatures than aluminum bronze.

Ill

and container 5. A pyrometer ,Well adapted for use in a container for a fluid under high tempera-- ture and pressure comprising an aluminum bronze head portion adapted to be secured in position in the wall of vsaid container, and an elongated ascoloy tube portion secured in said head and adapted to contact with said fluid. i

6. A pyrometer well adapted for use in a container for a fluid under high temperature comprising a head portion adapted to be seated in an opening in the wall of the container and made of a material having a thermal coetficient of expansion not less than that of the material of the container wall and an elongated tube portion secured to said head and formed of a material having a lower thermal coefiicient of expansion than the material of'said container wall and highly resistant to corrosion. v.

Signedat St. Louis, in the county of St;

Louis and State of Missouri, this 23rd day of April, A. D. 1927.

v FO STER ALIC POOLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6367974 *Apr 19, 1999Apr 9, 2002Peter LinThermocouple apparatus and well for containers having a flanged access opening
Classifications
U.S. Classification136/242, 136/232, 374/E01.18
International ClassificationG01K1/14
Cooperative ClassificationG01K1/14
European ClassificationG01K1/14