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Publication numberUS1745677 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1930
Filing dateJun 24, 1929
Priority dateJun 24, 1929
Publication numberUS 1745677 A, US 1745677A, US-A-1745677, US1745677 A, US1745677A
InventorsKinley Hopper Mack
Original AssigneeKinley Hopper Mack
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aeroplane wing
US 1745677 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PPER AEROPLANE WING Feb. 4

2 -Sheet,

Filed Jun 2 929 v f. K

INVENTOR 7 1 41. r A TORNEY Patented Feb. 4, 1930 PATEN MACK KIINLEY EQIPPEB, F MIRANDO C'ITY, TEXAS AZEROIELANE WING Application filed June 24,

The invention relates to the art of aero nautics and it particularly has for its object to provide a simple and effective Wing structune, by means of which the rate of dying ospeed and the supporting capacity 01? the machine may be varied without weakening thestructureof the Wing or adding undue weight to the machine.

Further, it is an object to provide a wing,

' 19 the lifting surface of which remains rigid while the top surface of which may be raised or lowered to increase or diminish the wind resistance and consequently decrease or increase the speed of the ship. Further, it is an object of the invention to provide a wing of such construction that it may be thickened or thinned at will within certain limits of course, thereby changing its lifting capacity within the range provided.

Gther objects will in part be obvious and in part be pointed out hereinafter.

To the attainment of the aforesaid objects and ends, my invention consists in the novel features of construction and in combination, connection and arrangement of parts, hereinafter more fully described, and then pointed out in the appended claims.

in the drawings:

Figure l is a perspective view of a portion of a wing with aileron removed and a portion of the cover broken away.

Figure 2 is a cross section on the line 2-2 of Figure 1.-

Figure 3 is a cross section on the line 3-3 of Figure 1, the aileron being shown in dotted lines.

Figured is a detail perspective view of the overlapped sheet metal leading edge cover stri s. I

Figure 5 is detail side elevation of the lower section or body of one of the main ribs.

Figure 6 is a similar view of the upper or adjustable section of one of the main ribs.

In the drawings in which like numerals of reference indicate like parts in. all of the figures, the wing l in my presen" invention is composed of a set of ribs mounted on longitudinal spars 8. The ribs consist of long ribs used on those portions of the wing not carry ing the ailerons, and short ribs used on those 1928. Serial No. 373,336.

portions of the wing to which the ailerons are attached. Each long rib consists of lower or main body or section 2 having its rear or trailing edge slotted as at 3- and pro vided with pin holes 4 for a purpose present 1y explained.

The lower rib body 2 is of skeleton truss form and is provided with fore and aft spar sockets 5 in which the spars 8 are located. The front or leading edges of the rib bodies 2 are provided with link pins 6 to which the slotted links 9 are pivoted. Mounted on the lower rib bodies 2, the rear of the front spars, are bearing hangers 7 in which rock shafts 19 are journalled.

Each long rib also includes so upper section 10 composed of s. has and suitable braces, the bar being bent to; conform the normal curvature of the upper surface oi the wing. Each bar 10 is braced by a vertical brace 12 and fore and aft braces 13 and 1 the braces 12 and the lore and aft braces being connected to brace terminal link con nections 11. it she rear ends the upper seotions of'the main ribs are apertured to receive pins 23 which pass through the apertures in the lower section and serve to hingedly connect the upper and lower rib sections to gather along their rear edges.

At the front the upper rib sections l' carry link pins 22 that operate in the slotted lin 9 hereinbefore referred to end serv to conmeet the front or leading edges of the upper and lower rib sections together in a manner that they may have limited movement reletively toward and from one another.

Where the ailerons are located short rib members are provided. These members consist of lower sectionsQil and upper sections 30.

lhe lower sections have spar sockets 31 in a which the spare 5?) lie.

The lower and upper rib sections and 30 are connected. together at their leading or front edges by pin and link connections sirni larly to the long ribs and at the rear the upper rib sections 30. are connected with the lower sections 2%) by link pin and slot connections 32 similar to those at she front, in other respects the upper rib sections 3O are similar to those of the long rib sections 10 The upper rib sections are raised and iowered in unison by means of the rock shaft 19 which is provided with a set of adjusting arms 20 connected by links 21 to the several terminal link connections 11.

The upper rib sections of the several ribs are connected by fore and aft cross members 15 and 17 respectively, to which the rib members are braced by braces 16 and 18 respec tively. i

The ribs and spars constitute a skeleton which is provided with a cover 24 of the usual kind and at the front or leading edge of the rib there is provided, secured to the upper surface of the wing, a strip 25 of aluminum or other similar material, the lower edge of whichprojects between the folded strip or plate 26-27 of aluminum or other similar material that is secured to the lower surface of the wing, The purpose of having the edge 25 telescoped into the edges 26 and 27 is to prevent the wind entering the body of the wing.

he shaft 19 is turned to adjust the wing, i. e., to raise or lower the upper sections of the ribs and consequently the upper surface of the wing, by a suitable operating mechanism 28 that may be actuated by the operator in the cockpit. This operating mechanism may be of any mechanical type as for instance a crank and gear connection with the shaft 19.

From the foregoing description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, it willd be seen that by turning the shaft 19 in a manner to raise the upper rib sections and consequently the upper surface of the wing, the wing is thickened at the front and greater air resistance is oifered, thus reducing the flying speed of the vehicle accordingly. Conversely, lowering the upper surface of the wing thins the cross section of the wing and reduces the air resistance, thereby permittiing the vehicle to travel at a greater spec From the foregoing description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, it is thought the construction, operation and advantages of the invention will be clear to those skilled in the art to which it appertains.

What I claim is:

1. An aeroplane wing comprising a set of ribs each composed of a lower rigid section and an upper rigid section, means hingediy connecting said sections together at their aft edges, slotted links connecting'the fore edges ofsaid upper and lower sections, said lower sections having spar receiving sockets, spars in said sockets forholding several ribs of the set in spaced relation, a covering'for the aforesaid structure, andmeans to raise and lower said upper section, I

2. An aeroplane wing comprising a set of ribs each composed of a lower rigid section and an upper rigid section, means hingedly' manor? connecting said sections together at their aft edges, slotted links connecting the fore edges of said upper and lower sections, said lower sections having spar receiving sockets, spars in said sockets for holding several ribs of the set in spaced relation, a covering for the aforesaid structure, and means to raise and lower said upper section, said covering includingoverlapped strips at the fore or leading edge of the wing.

3. An aeroplane wing comprising a set of ribs each composed of a lower rigid section and an upper rigid s'ction, means hingedly connecting said sections together at their aft edges, slotted links connecting the fore edges of said upper and lower sections, said lower sections having spar receiving sockets, spars in said sockets for holding several ribs of the set in spaced relation, a covering for the aforesaid structure, means to raise and lower said upper section, said covering including overlapped strips at the fore or leading edge of the wing, said strips comprising a single member on the upper part of the wing and a double member on the lower part of the wing, the single member having of said upper and lower sections, said lower.

sections having spar receiving sockets,spars in said sockets for holding several ribs of the set in spaced relation, a covering for the aforesaid structure, and means to raise and lowersaid upper section, said ribs including long and short ones, the long ones having the spar sockets of the lower sections open at the top. 5. n aeroplane wing comprlsmg a set of ribs each composed of a lower rigid section and an upper rigid section, means hingedly connecting said sect-ions together at't-heir aft edges, slotted links connecting the fore edges of said upper and lower sections, said lower sections having spar receiving sockets, spars in said sockets for holding several ribs of the set in spaced relation, a covering for the aforesaid structure, means to raise and lower said upper section, said ribs including long and short ones, the long ones having the spar sockets of the lower sections open at the top, the upper and lower sections of the short ribs having pin and slotted link connections at the rear as well as atthe front.

6. An aeroplane wing comprising a set of ribs each composed of-a'lower rigid section and an upper rigid section, means hingedly connecting said sections together at their aft edges, slotted links connecting the fore edges of said upper and lower sections, said lower -40 v. v connection to which sa1d braces are oined,

9 in said sockets forholding several ribs of v the set in spaced relation, a covering for the aforesaid structure, means to raise and lower said-upper sec tions, said upper rib 1 sections eachincl'udinga vertical brace and fore and aft'b'races connected to a terminal link connection, bearing hangers mounted on the lower rib sections, a rock shaft journalled in said' hangers,- adjusting arms on said shaft and link-connecting said arms. to said terminal link connections.

- '17., In aeroplane wings, a pair of longitudim1. spare, a set of ribs arranged transversely of said'spars and spaced apart, a covering over said ribs and spars, each ofsaid ribs I comprising a lower rigid body of skeleton I i structure and an upper body consisting of a long curved rib-bar, a vertical brace, fore j and aft braces, and a terminal link connection to which said braces are joined, said upperand lower rib bodies being hinged to- Q gether at their rear edges, slotted links connec'ting the fore edges of said upper and lower rib bodies, meansmounted on the lower rib bodlesand connected to sa d'terminal link connections for raising and lowering said upper'rib bodies with respect to said lower rib bodies, longitudinal members connecting the upper ribbodies togetherfore and aft, and braces lconnecting said longitudinal members to said upper rib'bodies. and a cov-.

ering for the whole. l

8'. In aeroplane wings, a pairof longitu- 'dinal spars, a set of ribs arranged transversely of said spars and spaced apart, a

covering over said-ribs and spars, each of said; ribscomprising a. lower" rigid body of v 'skeletonstructure and an upper body consisting of a "long, eurvedrib-baryavertical brace, fore and aft brac'es,'and a terminal link said upper and lower rib-bodies being hinged "together'a't their rear edgesQsI ttedfIinkS connecting the fore edges of "said upper and lower'rib-bodi'es, means mountedon the lower rib' bodies andconnected to saidterminalilink connections for raising and flowering-saidupper rib bodies with respect.tosaid lower I'lb bodies, longitudinal members connectirg the upper rib bodies together fore and a ,and'braces connecting-said longitudinal members-to said 11 per rib bodies, and a covering fo'rith'e who e, said coverin including 1telescopin* plate strips along-t e fore or leading e go of the wing, said plate strips being- 7 ecured respectively to the upper and low'erfabes'ofthe wing. g i

" MA'CK'KINLEY HOPPER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4432516 *Oct 30, 1981Feb 21, 1984Muscatell Ralph PVariable airfoil assembly
US4553722 *Dec 30, 1982Nov 19, 1985The Boeing CompanyVariable-camber airfoil
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/219
International ClassificationB64C3/00, B64C3/48
Cooperative ClassificationB64C3/48
European ClassificationB64C3/48