Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1747384 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1930
Filing dateNov 23, 1928
Priority dateNov 23, 1928
Also published asDE536893C
Publication numberUS 1747384 A, US 1747384A, US-A-1747384, US1747384 A, US1747384A
InventorsAndrew Olson, Walter Holms
Original AssigneeCleveland Folding Mach Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Moving deflector
US 1747384 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 18, 1930. A. 'Lsofl ET AL MOVING DEFLECTOR Filed Nov. 23, 1928 2 sheets sheet- 1 flndrew Olson. Waller flu/m5, v

Q ATTORNEYS Patented Feb-'18, 1930' UNITED STATES- PATENT OFFICE ANDREW OLSON AND WALTER EOLMS, OF CLEVELAND, OH IO, ASSIGNORS, BY ASSIGNMENTS, TO THE CLF-YELAND FOLDING MACHINE COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF OHIO (1929) movme DEFLECTOR Application filed November 28, 1928. Serial No. 321,839;

This invention relates to improvements in moving deflectors for use upon paper handling machines and has particular utility when employed in connection with paper folding machines designed to handle sheets printed with two or more signatures that are cut apart during the travel ofthe 4 sheet through the folding machine, the corresponding signatures from all of the sheets'being.

delivered andstacked separately.

One of the objects of the invention is the provision of a deflector ofv this type which shall be simple in construction and certain in its operation. I

Another object isthe provision of means for actuating the sheet deflector, said means comprising shoes in the different courses taken by the signatures, said shoes being shifted by the travel of the signatures themselves, together with means for transmitting motion from one shoe to the other, whereby one shoe is always in operative position, the deflector itself comprising a portion of said last-named means.

Other objects and features of novelty will appear as we proceed with the description of that embodiment of the invention which, for the purposes of the present application, we have illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a fragment of a sheet stacker embodying our invention' 1 Fig. 2 is a plan view partially in section on line 2--2 of Fig; 1;

Fig. 3 is a detail sectional view on line 3--3 of Fig. 1; y

Fig. 1 is a longituidnal vertical sectional view taken substantially on line 1--5 of Fig.

'2, and showing the deflector in position to direct sheets onto the upper stacker belt; and

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4 but with the deflector in position to direct sheets onto the lower stacker belt.

ment of the frame of a folding machine. On this frame are rotatably mounted delivery rolls 11 and 12 connected for rotation by intermeshing gears 13 and 14, one of these gears being driven in some suitable manner from In the drawings we have shown at 10 a frag-.

other moving parts of the folding machine.

Folded sheets delivered by the rolls 11, 12' ride over a guide plate 15 and are thereby directed between feed rolls 16 and 17 0f the stacker, these rolls being mounted for rota- I tion in the side members 18 of the stacker frame. The rolls 16 and 17 are mounted upon shafts 19 and 20, respectively, which-extend through both of the frame members 18. On the forward side of the machine these shafts carry intermeshing gears 21 and 22. The latter gear meshes with an idler 23 rotatably supported upon the forward frame member 18. When the stacker is set in operative'position, with respect to the folding machine, the idler 23 is caused to mesh with a gear 24 mounted on the shaft of roll 12 behind the framemember 10 of the folding machine. By this means driving force is transmitted from the machine to the stacker. Behind the rolls16, 17, that is to speaking with regard to the line of travel of the sheets I through the machine, and in the path of the sheets delivered by the rolls 16, 17 there is a shaft 25 upon which is fixed a deflector 26 triangular in cross section. The forward edge or nose of the deflector is shiftable across the path of the sheets from one side to .the other thereof, these positions being indicated in Figs. 4 and 5. Outside the forward frame member 18 theshaft 25 is slotted to takea small plate 27 that extends radially beyond the shaft for an appreciable-distance, forming projections. This plate may be pinned or otherwise held in place in the shaft and, 95 obviously, the projections on the shaft may be otherwise formed, if desired.

Thefolded sheets, deflected either up or down by the deflector 26, are directed by the flat sides ofthe deflector into two different courses,'one between the rolls 28 and 29 and the other between the rolls 30 and 31. The rolls 29 and 31 are preferably cylindrical metal rolls provided intermediate their ends with annular recesses 32 and 33. The rolls 28 and, 30, however, are similar to the rolls 11, 12, 16 and 17 having spaced apart paper contacting disks or wheels. The shafts upon which the rolls 28, 29,30 and 31 are mounted eitend through the rear frame member 18 of 100 the machine, and 'are there furnished with intermeshing gears 34, 35, 36 and 37, respectively, the gear 34 meshing in turn with an idler gear '38 rotated by a gear 39 on the rear end of the shaft '19.

Rock shafts 40 and 41 are supported in bearings in the frame members 18 above and below the deflector 26. Intermediate their ends and at points opposite the annular recesses 32 and 33 in the rolls 29and 31, these shafts carry .shoes 42 and 43 which preferably have counterbalancing arms 44and 45,- respectively. The free ends of these shoes.

are adapted to extend into the annular re- 'cesses 32 and 33, as indicated for the shoe 42 in Fig. 4 and the shoe 43 in Fig. 5, or to be shifted outof said recesses and to extend into the spaces between the disks or wheels of the adjacent rolls 28 and 30, as indicated for the shoe 43 of Fig. 4 and the shoe'42 of Fig. 5. When a folded sheet traveling over the surface of one of the rolls 29 or 31 encounters a shoe extending into the recess 32 or 33, as the case may be, the shoe 1s im- ,mediately swung upon its axis, moving out of plate 27, and the eflector 26 is thus shifted from one operative position to the other.

At the same time, the swinging of one of the shoes 42 or 43 out of the corresponding recess 32 or 33, caused by the travel of the folded sheet over the recess, serves to transmit motion through the two crank fingers 46 and 47 and the intervening plate 27 to the other shoe, bringing the free end of the latter back into its annular recess, in other words setting it in operative position.

Folded sheets leaving the rolls 28, 29 drop onto an endless stacker belt 48 which is continuously moved at relatively slow speed by any suitable means, such, for instance, as a train of gears comprising the gear 35,- an

idler gear 49 and a gear 50 mounted on a roller 51 over which the belt runs, this train of gears being located behind the rear frame member 18 of the machine. Folded sheets delivered from the rolls 30, 31 drop onto a stacker belt .52 which runs over a roller 53 carrying at its rear end a gear 54 which meshes with an idler 55 driven by the gear 37..

Starting with the positionof the parts illustrated in Fig. 4, a sheet of paper traveling over the plate 15 and through the feed rolls 16 and 17 emerges therefrom and strikes upon the upper surface of the deflector -26 nose of the deflector.

and is thereby guided upwardly between the rolls 28 and 29. In order that the forward edge of the sheet may pass through these rolls, however, it mustfirst push aside the free end of shoe 42, that is it must shift the shoe out of the recess 32 and into the position illustratedin Fig. 5. i force necessary to swing the shoe to this extent is readily exerted by the advancing folded sheet. At the same time the crank 46 is also swung through a corresponding angle to the position illustrated in Fig. 5, and thenose of the deflector is thereby shifted from the position of Fig. 4 to that of Fig. 5. This is ordinarily done before the rear edge of the sheet has passed the l'Vhen the deflector is thus moved, the plate 27 swings the crank 47 from the position of Fig. 4 to that of Fig. 5, and this movement acting through the shaft 41 swings the shoe 43 from its inoperative position of Fig. 4 into its operative position of Fig. 5. The next succeeding sheet traveling through the rolls 16 and 17 therefore engages the under side of the deflector 26 and has its course bent downwardly so that the sheet passes between rolls .30 and 31, engaging the shoe 43 andswinging it from the position of Fig. 5 back to the position of Fig. 4, thereby shifting the deflector 26 again back to its original position of Fig. 4, and resetting the shoe 42 into its operative position of Fig. 4. The cycle of operations thereafter repeats itself.

The deflector 26, it will be observed, is shifted by the movement of the sheets themselves, and is always in proper position regardless of the time interval between succeeding sheets.

In Figs. 4 and 5, the two positions of the folded sheets, corresponding to the positions of the deflector parts illustrated in the respective figures is shown in full lines. The later position of one of the sheets, after it has travelled through the deflecting mechanism, is indicated in the same figures in dotted lines.

Although in the present disclosure we have illustrated and described with considerable the invention, we desire it to be understood that such detail disclosure is primarily, for, purposes of illustration and is not to be construed as limiting the scope of the invention.

Having thus described our invention, we claim:

1.- In a paper handling machine, means for causing the sheets to travel single file in a given path, a deflector for directing sheets from said path into either'of two different courses, a shoe in each of said courses adapted to be'shifted by the sheets traveling therethrough, and a connection between said de flector and each of said shoes, whe'rebythe,

The amount of particularity one preferred embodimentpof- 611";-

3o into operative position,

I shoes is shifted by movement of one shoe out of operative position due to the travel of a sheet in the corresponding course sets the deflector todirect the succeeding'sheet into the other course, and the movement of the deflector sets the other shoe into operative position.

2. In a paper handling machine, means for causing the sheets to travel single file in a given path, a deflector for directing sheets from said path into either of two different courses, a shoe in each of said courses adapted to be shifted by the sheets traveling therethrough, flector itself for operatively connecting said two shoes, whereby the travel of a sheet in one of said courses shifts the deflector to direct a succeeding sheet into the other course and shifts the other shoe into operative position. 1

3. In a paper handling machine, means for causing sheets to travel single file in a given path, a pivoted deflector for directing sheets from said path into either of two different courses, a shoe in each of said courses adapted to be shifted from operative to inoperative position by a sheet traveling that course, means for operatively connecting said two shoes, whereby the movement of one shoeinto inoperative position due to the travel of a sheet in that course shifts the other shoe said means comprising two articulated connections, one between each of said shoes and said deflector, the deflector is shifted position to the other whereby from one operative when either of said the travel of a sheet in its course.

4. In a paper handling machine, means-for causing sheets to travel single file in a 'ven path, a pivoted deflector for directing s eets from said path into either of two different courses, a shoe in each of said courses adap to be shifted from operative to inoperative position by a sheet traveling that course, a crank operatively associated with each of said shoes hearing at its outer extremity against said deflector at a point removed from the axis thereof, said cranks working in opposition upon said eflector, whereby the movement of either shoe out of operative position by the travel of a sheet in its course shifts the deflector to direct a succeeding sheet into the other course and moves the other shoe into operative position.

5. In a paper handling machine, means for causing sheetsto travel single file in a given path, a pivoted deflector for directing sheets from said path into eitherof two difierent courses, a shoe in each of said courses adapted to be shifted from" operative to. inoperative position by a sheet traveling that course, a

pait of projections extending outwardly from one end thereof, a crankopsaid deflector at eratively associated with each of said shoes and bearing at its outerextremity against one and means comprising the desad shoes to inoperative position travel'of a sheet acting through the corresponding crank and rojection to shift said deflector in one direction and a similar movement of the other shoe'acting to shift the. deflector in the opposite direction, said deflector serving through the connections stated to transmit movement other. I

6. In a paper handling machine, means for causing sheets to travel single file in a given ath, a pivoted deflector for directing: sheets rom said path into either of two different courses, a pair of pivoted shoes,'each extending at times into one of said courses and adapted to be swung away from said course by-the travel of a sheet therethrough, a crank attached to the pivot of each of said shoes, and a pair of opposed outwardly extending projections upon said deflector with which the free ends of said cranks engage, whereby the movement of one shoe out of the corres ending course is communicated to said deector toswing the same, and through said deflector to the other crank to swing the other shoe into its course.

In testimony whereof, we hereunto aflix our signatures.

- ANDREW OLSON. WALTER HOLMS.

by the of said projections, the movement of one of I from one shoe to the

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2526916 *May 8, 1946Oct 24, 1950Hoe & Co RSwitch or deflector device for directing the products of printing machines
US2911131 *Dec 29, 1954Nov 3, 1959Gen Motors CorpPaper packet processing machine
US3017179 *Sep 9, 1958Jan 16, 1962American Photocopy Equip CoSheet separator device
US3162435 *Sep 5, 1962Dec 22, 1964Pitney Bowes IncEnvelope flap conditioning apparatus
US3283705 *Sep 2, 1965Nov 8, 1966Dick Co AbDuplicating machine with dual receiving trays
US4871163 *May 20, 1988Oct 3, 1989Savin CorporationPaper control gate
Classifications
U.S. Classification271/303
International ClassificationB65H29/60
Cooperative ClassificationB65H29/60
European ClassificationB65H29/60