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Publication numberUS1749919 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 11, 1930
Filing dateAug 27, 1928
Priority dateAug 27, 1928
Publication numberUS 1749919 A, US 1749919A, US-A-1749919, US1749919 A, US1749919A
InventorsIra C Mierley
Original AssigneeIda B Mierley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Operating curette
US 1749919 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 11, 1930.

I. C. MIERLEY OPERATING CURETTE Filed Aug. 27, 1928 Patented Mar. 11, 1930 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE IRA G. MIEBLEY, OF DENVER, COLORADO, ASSIGNOR T IDA IB. MIERLEY, 01 DENVER,

COLORADO OPERATING CURETTE Application filed August 27, 1928. Serial No. 302,271.

This invention relates to a curette more particularly to a bone curette of the type arranged for removing exuberent or dead tis sue. The invention is especially valuable for 5 mastoidal and radical sinus surgery but it 15 not limited to these uses as it can be effectively employed as an operating curette for re- 7 moval of foreign bodies, growths, etc.

The principal object of the invention is 10 to provide a curette in which the cutting or scraping edge will always be visible to the operator so that the exact position of the edge and the operation being performed can be seen at all times.

Another object of the invention isto so design the curette that it will elevate and sup- 7 port the periosteum while the curetting operation is being carried on so that the perios-' teum will be entirely out of the way and will not obstruct the view of the operation.

A further object of the invention is to provide a curette in which all drainage, scrapings, tissue, etc, may be immediately removed through the body of the instrument by use of an aspirator.

A still further object of the invention is to so construct the handle of the curette so that the operator can at all times determine the exact position of the operating edge by the position of the handle.

Other objects andadvantages reside in the detail construction of the invention, which is designed for simplicity, economy, and efii ciency. These will become more apparent from the following description.

In the following detailed description of the invention reference is had to the accompanyin drawing which forms a part hereof.

Lilre numerals refer to like parts in all views so. of the drawing and throughout the description.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of my improved curette.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged longitudinal section through the operating extremity.

The invention comprises a relatively fine metallic tube 10, slightly curved at its free extremity as shown at 11 and provided with 5 a handle 12. The handle 12 comprises a square portion which is roughened or knurled to provide a firm secure finger grip. The handle terminates in a hose or tubing nipple 13' which receives the extremity of an aspirator tube.

The operatin edge of the curette is indicated at 14 an cuts diagonally across the tubing 10-on a linesubstantially parallel to the long axis of the tube. The positioning of the edge 14 and the relatively gentle curve 11 are the principal features of the invention and allow the operator to place himself in close proximity to the zone of operation and at all times'view the operating edge and its work.

The position of the operating edge with respect to the curved portion 11, allows the operator to force the tip of the instrument into the incision in the periosteum so that the incised edge of the periosteum will slide up over the curved portion 11. This elevates the periosteum and opens the incision so that, by looking along the instrument, the operators line of vision is along the plane of the oblique cutting edge 14. This enables him to see the exact action of the operating edge at all. positions of the instrument.

Particles of tissue and drainage from the tissues pass immediately into the interior of the tube 10 and is drawn away by the aspirator. The major portion of the actual operating is done with the upper extremity of the edge 14, allowing thelower edge to direct material into the tube. The upper extremity may be sharpened by beveling its interior as as indicated at 15, Fig. 2, so that the instrument can be used for a cutting operation as well as for scraping.

The square handle is so placed that two of its faces lie parallel to the plane of the operon ating edge 14 so that the operator is enabled to feel the rotation of the instrument in his fingers and knows at all times the exact facing of the curve 11 and the cutting edge 14, by sub-consciously noting the rotation of the squared handle in his fingers.

In mastoid work and radical sinus surgery the passages for the insertion of a eurette are very small and sinuous. By the use of this instrument the tube 10 acts to retract 15);)

the Walls and curves of the passages and hold extremity, said operating edge lying in a them in alignment back in the line of vision plane parallel to the axis of said straight edge 14 so that the zone ofoperation even under the periosteum is completely visible at at times. V

While a specific form of the improvement has been described and illustrated herein, it is desired to be understood that the same may be varied, Within the scope of the appended claims, Without departingfrom the spirit of the invention. 7 Having thus described the invention, What I claim and desire secured by Letters Patent is V a 1'. An aspirating curette comprising: a

tube, said tube being relatively straight for they majority of its length; a gently curved portion on one extremity on said tube; and

an obliquely placed operating edge: on the ex- 1 tremity of said-cm'ved portion.

2. An aspirating curette comprising: a tube, said tube being relatively straight for the majority of its length; a curved portion 3 on one extremity on said tube; and an obliquely placed operating edge on the extremity of said curved portion, said operating edge. lying in a plane substantially parallel to thestraightlength ojisaid tube.

3. An aspirating curette comprising:

tube, said tube being relatively straight for the majority of its length; a curved portion on one extremity on said tube; an obliquely placed operating edge on the extremity of said curved portion; and aninternal beveled surface ad acent said operating edge acting to sharpen said edge around its extreme periphery. I Y 7 4. An aspirating curette, comprising: a tube, said tube being relatively straightfor the majority of its length; arcurved por 'tion on one extremity on said tube; an obliquely placed, operating edge on thelex tremity of said curved portion and a squared handle secured on the other extremity of said tube, said handle beinghollow and communicating With the openingthrough said tube. .l

5. An aspirating curette comprising: a tube, said tube being relatively straight for the majority of its length; a curved portion on one extremity on said tube; an obliquely placed operating edge ontheextremityoisaid curved portion; a squared handlesecured on the other extremity of said tube, said handle being hollow and communicating With the opening through said tube; and a tube nipbetween the operators eye and the cutting tube and spaced away therefrom;

6. An aspirating curette comprising a I U straight tube; a gently curved extremity on said tube so as to place the operating edge thereof considerably to one side of sald 7 straight tube, and an obliquely placed oper- 7 ating edge on the extremity of said curved I

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2562129 *Jan 23, 1946Jul 24, 1951Scherer Corp R PHypodermic syringe
US2715899 *Nov 21, 1952Aug 23, 1955Maclean Kenneth SheldonCurette
US2748769 *Feb 24, 1953Jun 5, 1956Jennie HuberHypodermic needle
US2944552 *Dec 29, 1958Jul 12, 1960Richard B WilkSurgical instrument
US4368738 *Mar 31, 1981Jan 18, 1983Bernd TersteegenCannula
US4596553 *May 7, 1984Jun 24, 1986Hans LeeMethod and apparatus for performing suction lipectomy
US4627834 *Sep 18, 1984Dec 9, 1986Hans LeeApparatus for performing suction lipectomy
US4676780 *Feb 21, 1986Jun 30, 1987Hans LeeSurgical apparatus for performing suction lipectomy
US4713053 *May 6, 1985Dec 15, 1987Hans LeeMethod and apparatus for performing suction lipectomy
US4938743 *Jun 29, 1989Jul 3, 1990Hans LeeSurgical apparatus for performing suction lipectomy
US4955894 *Jan 30, 1989Sep 11, 1990Alcon Laboratories, Inc.Posterior capsulotomy knife
US5575780 *Jul 19, 1995Nov 19, 1996Saito; YoshikuniMedical hollow needle and a method of producing thereof
US5968022 *Oct 7, 1998Oct 19, 1999Saito; YoshikuniMedical hollow needle and method of production
US6402734 *Jul 2, 1998Jun 11, 2002Jeffrey N. WeissApparatus and method for cannulating retinal blood vessels
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/84, 604/35, 604/272, 606/160
International ClassificationA61B17/22
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/320708
European ClassificationA61B17/3207C