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Publication numberUS1750369 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 11, 1930
Filing dateJul 21, 1928
Priority dateJul 21, 1928
Publication numberUS 1750369 A, US 1750369A, US-A-1750369, US1750369 A, US1750369A
InventorsWalter K Septer
Original AssigneeWalter K Septer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Workholding apparatus
US 1750369 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 11, 1930.

W. K. SEPTER 1,750,369

WORKHOLDING APPARATUS Filed July 2l, 1928 'fcgi Mw. TEE K, EPTE/,'

Patented Mar. 11, 1930 UNITED STATES WALTER K. SEPTER, OF DUQUESNE, PENNSYLVANIA WORKHOLDING APPARATUS Appli-cation filed July 21, 1928.

This invention relates to work supports and, while not limited thereto, relates more particularly to work supports for supporting metal slabs and similar heavy metal articles while defects are being chipped therefrom,vor other work is being done thereon.

Heretofore, it has been customary when chipping or cutting defects from the edges of small slabs to have one workman hold the slab while a second workman cuts out the defects by a power' operated tool. This operation required the time of two workmen, and was also dangerous, since chips would at times fly and injure the workman holding the slab and, at other times, the slab would fall and in]- ure either one or both of the workmen. `When cutting defects from large slabs the slabs were usually set on edge and then blocked up by temporary blocks. This last method was also dangerous in that the slabs would sometimes fall and injure the workmen.

The present invention provides a mechanical support for supporting the slabs while defects are being chipped or cut therefrom,

and, therefore, eliminates the extra Workmen used to hold the small slabs, and provides an efficient and safe support that is readily adapted to support all sizes of slabs.

In the drawings- Figure l is a plan view of a support constructed in accordance with my invention.

Figure 2 is an end view thereof.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary sectional side elevation through the flanges of the apparatus.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, the letter A designates an anvil block which may conveniently be a section of a 0 steel bloom or any other suitable heavy block adapted to form a solid anvil for the slab or other article being worked on.

An inverted U-shaped base member 2 is fitted over said anvil block A, and has each of its vertical side portions 3 provided with a pair of horizontally disposed vertically spaced flanges 4 and 5 which are conveniently formed by riveting lengths of angle irons on the portions 3.

serial No. 294,419.

The flanges t and 5 are provided with a plurality of alined holes 6 and 7, respectively, to receive bars or rods 8. The holes 7, in the lower flange 5, are of slightly smaller diameter than the holes 6 in the upper flange 4 and the lower ends of the bars or rods 8 are tapered, as at 9, so as to enter and wedge in the holes 7 In operation, one of the bars 8 is mounted in the flanges l and 5 on one side of the base member 2 and a slab to be worked on'is positioned on the base, then a second bar 8 is mounted in the flanges 4 and 5, on the other side of the base member and on the opposite side of the slab, so as to hold the slab in up right position.

Tf desired, four bars or rods 8 may be used instead of two, as shown, so as to hold the slab more rigid, and in such case, two bars will be positioned in the flanges on each side of the base, one bar being on each side of the slab.

While I have shown and described one specific embodiment of my invention, it will be understood that I do not wish to be limited thereto since various modifications may be made without departing from the scope thereof as defined in the appended claims.

T claiml. A work holder for metal slabs and the like comprising an inverted U-shaped base member, a pair of horizontal vertically spaced flanges extending outwardly from each of the side members of said base, the flanges of each of said pairs of flanges being provided with a series of vertically alined holes, and a plurality of rods adapted to be mounted in selected ones of said holes to hold the work in a substantially vertical position.

2. A work holder for metal slabs and the like comprising the combination with a relatively rigid heavy anvil block, of an inverted U-shaped member adapted to be fitted over said anvil block, a pair of horizontal vertically spaced flanges extending outwardlyV from each of the side members of said base, the flanges of each of said'pairs of flanges being provided with a series of vertically alined holes, and a plurality of rods adapted to be mounted in selected ones of said holes to hold the work in a substantially vertical position,

said rods being held against horizontal movement When mounted in said holes.

3. A Work holder for metal slabs and the like comprising a hase member having a pair of vertically disposed horizontally spaced side walls, a pair of horizontal vertically spaced flanges extending` outwardly from each of said Walls of said base, the ianges of each of said pairs of flanges being provided with a series of vertically alined holes, and a plurality of rods adapted to be mounted in selected ones of said holes to hold the Work, said rods being held against horizontal move ment when mounted in said holes.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand.

WALTER K. SEPTER.

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US6224936Oct 7, 1998May 1, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Method for reducing warpage during application and curing of encapsulant materials on a printed circuit board
US6279758 *Aug 30, 2000Aug 28, 2001Micron Technology, Inc.Apparatus and method for facilitating circuit board processing
US6398043Jun 4, 2001Jun 4, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Apparatus and method for facilitating circuit board processing
US6408510Apr 1, 1999Jun 25, 2002Micron Technology, Inc.Method for making chip scale packages
US6527999Apr 13, 2001Mar 4, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Using clamping fixture constructed so a slight bow or curvature thereof can counter either a convex or concave bow or curvature of the printed circuit board
US6592670May 24, 2000Jul 15, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Apparatus for reducing warpage during application and curing of encapsulant materials on a printed circuit board
US6655535Apr 25, 2002Dec 2, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Methods for facilitating circuit board processing
US6764549Jul 14, 2003Jul 20, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for reducing warpage during application and curing of encapsulant materials on a printed circuit board
US6830719Feb 5, 2003Dec 14, 2004Micron Technology, Inc.Method for reducing warpage during application and curing of encapsulant materials on a printed circuit board
US7166252Dec 13, 2004Jan 23, 2007Micron Technology, Inc.Method for reducing warpage during application and curing of encapsulant materials on a printed circuit board
Classifications
U.S. Classification269/95, 269/305
International ClassificationB23Q3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB23Q3/00, B23Q2703/00
European ClassificationB23Q3/00