Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1751208 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1930
Filing dateMar 14, 1929
Priority dateMar 14, 1929
Publication numberUS 1751208 A, US 1751208A, US-A-1751208, US1751208 A, US1751208A
InventorsKappes Andrew C
Original AssigneeWrigley W M Jun Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Confection package
US 1751208 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A.- c. KAPPES, 1,751,208

CONFECTION PACKAGE M'mh 1s, 1930.

Filed March 14, 1929 Patented Mar. 18, 1930 oFFrc PATE ANDREW G. KAPPES, F CI-ITCAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO WM. WRIGLEY JR. COM-- IPANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE CONFECTION PACKAGE Application filed March 14, 1929.

This invention relates to improvements in confection packages, and more particularly to packages for lozenge shaped chewing confections.

It is customary to package these confections in a wrapper of parafline paper, sealing the flaps by the application of heat to make the package moisture-proof. Moreover, the confections are packed in rows, the several pieces being arranged in fiatwise contact. In a patent granted to Andrew C. Kappes on August 25, 1925, No. 1,550,966, a package is disclosed in which the wrapper of paraffine paper is pressed inwardly between the several pieces With the application of heat, thereby forrning a series of corrugations surrounding the package from end to end. Thepurpose of these corrugations is to provide a retaining recess for each individual piece of confection so that upon opening the package at one end and removing the endmost piece, the remaining pieces will not be dislodged and fall out when carrying the package in the pocket. V

' In addition to the parafiine wrapper, the

complete package includes an outer band or.

label wrapped around the package len thwise with its end portions overlapping on one face of the package and sealed.

The present improvement has to do with the application of this outer band, so as to aid in retaining the inner wrapper in its original corrugated form and to prevent its own displacement from the package.

A package embodying the novel features is disclosed in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a perspective view of a package before the outer band has been applied showing the corrugated appearance.

Figure 2 is a perspective view of a single lozenge shaped confection.

Figure 3 is a perspective View of a package with the outer band partially folded about it and ready for sealing; and

Figure 4 is a perspective view of the completed package.

For the purpose of this'disclosure, the pack age consists of ten lozenges A arranged edgewise and face to face in a row. These lozenges to are somewhat rounded at their edges and cor- Serial No. 346,963.

ners as shown in Figure 2, and are first enclosed in a wrapper B of parafline impregnated paper, with the end portions folded inwardly and over each other in the usual manner. As thus arranged and wrapped, depressions or crevices are formed between the edges of the lozenges into which the surrounding wrapper is depressed, giving the package the accordion appearance shown in Fi 'ure 3.

is already suggested, the package is subjected to pressure and heat while the wrapper is being applied and after the end portions have been folded this being usually accomplished by advancing the packages through or between electrically heated dies having corrugated surfaces.

The sealed package is then banded by an outer wrapper or band C, consisting preferably of a printed label. In applying this band, the edge portions-c and 0 preferably overlap throughout one of the wider faces of the package, the undermost edge 'portion 0 being first-corrugated to conform with the corrugations in the surface of the package beneath, as shown in Figure 3.

Before the top flap or portion 0 is brought over for sealing, relatively thin lines of-adhesive are applied along the crest of the elevated portions of the lower flap, as at (Z. Thus with the final sealing operation, the adhe sion between the two flaps 0' and 0 is along a series of parallel lines, which act to retain the corrugated form of the under flap, while the upper flap remains smooth thereby concealing the undulations beneath.

From the foregoing it is manifest that the corrugated under flap c becomes relatively fixed in that form, by reason of its several points or lines of adhesion with the upper flap, and the fact that the latter'is flat and tin-corrugated, thus acting as a tension member to retain the corrugations in the under flap, which in turn serve to stiffen or reinforce the corrugations in the paraffine wrapper with which they register. The result therefore is that the entire package is stiffened lengthwise and against elongation, as otherwise there is only the stifiness of the par-affine impregnated wrapper to maintain the corru gations. Furthermore, the particular manner of binding and sealing the outer wrapper or band, holds the latter in place, preventing it from sliding endwise and thus becoming displaced.

l/Vhile in the preferred form illustrated, glue is shown as applied at a) to each of the high points of the corrugation, it is manifest that similar results, can be obtained by applying glue to fewer such points, as for in stance to every other high spot,'or every glued thereto along the'elevated portions of said corrugations. V

2. A confection package comprising a plurality of lozenge shaped confections having rounded edges and arranged face to face, a wrapper of moisture proof paper enveloping said confections and sealed with theportions thereof intermediate the ends of the package depressed into the spaces between said confections on all sides, and an outer wrapper surrounding the sealed package lengthwise and having one marginal portion corrugated to conform to the surface beneath, and the other marginal portion overlapping said first mentioned marginal portion and sealed fiatwise along the elevated portions thereof.

3. A confection package comprising a plu- V rality of lozenge shaped confections arranged face to face and shaped to provide recesses between adjacent confections, a Wrapper of 'paraffine paper enveloping said confections and sealed at each end, with the paper pressed into the spaces between the individual confections throughout the central portion of the package to form transverse corrugations on each face thereof, and an outer wrapper surrounding the sealed package with its marginal portions overlapping on one face thereof, the nnderlapping portion being corrugated to conform to the surface'of the package beneath and the over lapping portion being smooth and sealed to the elevated areas of said underlapping por-. tion. .7

i. A method of packaging lozenge-shaped confections having rounded edges, consisting of applying an inner'wrapper, depressing said inner Wrapper into the spaces between the confections, providing an outer wrapper adapted to surround said package with its opposite marginal portions overlapping on extending one face thereof, corrugating the underlapping marginal portion of said outer wrapper to conform to the corrugations in the surface beneath, and sealing the overlapping marginal portion along the elevated portions of the corrugations of said underlapping marginal portion.

5. A method of packaging lozenge shaped confections having rounded edges, consisting of arranging the confections ina row .face to face, applyin a wrapper of moistureproof paper around said confections, deg press ng the wrapper 1nto the spaces between sald confections and seallng the ends thereof by the application of pressure and heat, surrounding the sealed package lengthwise with an outer wrapper, corrugatlng one marginalportion of said outer Wrapper to conform to the surface beneath, applying adhesive to'the elevated portions only of said corrugated marginal portion, and sealing the other marginal portion flatwise over the same.

Signed at Chicago, 111., this 11th day of March, 1929. I

- ANDREW C. KAPPES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7032754 *Oct 31, 2001Apr 25, 2006Wm. Wrigley Jr. CompanyPackage having releaseably secured consumable products
US7159717Dec 22, 2004Jan 9, 2007Cadbury Adams Usa, LlcPackaging design with separate compartments
US7325686May 9, 2005Feb 5, 2008Cadbury Adams Usa LlcPackage for dispensing and retaining gum slabs with adhesive securement
US7533773Jul 5, 2005May 19, 2009Cadbury Adams LlcReclosable consumable product package assembly
US7569008Apr 21, 2005Aug 4, 2009Cadbury Adams Usa LlcPackaging design with separate compartments
US7686165Mar 30, 2010Cadbury Adams Usa LlcPackaging design with separate compartments
US7811614Oct 12, 2010Cadbury Adams Usa LlcGum slab package having insertable product retention member
US7901719May 9, 2005Mar 8, 2011Cadbury Adams Usa LlcGum slab package with flap retention
US7913846Mar 29, 2011Cadbury Adams Usa LlcPackaging design with separate compartments
US7971718Jul 5, 2011Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcPackage for dispensing and retaining gum slabs with adhesive securement
US8172086May 8, 2012Cadbury Adams Usa LlcPackaging design with separate compartments
US8221812Jul 17, 2012Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcGum slab package having insertable product retention member
US8252352Mar 3, 2011Aug 28, 2012Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcGum slab package with flap retention
US8393469May 4, 2009Mar 12, 2013Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcReclosable consumable product package assembly
US8529971 *Oct 1, 2008Sep 10, 2013Cadbury Holdings LimitedPackaging of a stack of confectionery pellets and the like
US8607980Jan 29, 2010Dec 17, 2013Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcOpenable and reclosable sealed package for confectionery products
US8658229Jun 26, 2012Feb 25, 2014Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcGum slab package having insertable product retention member
US20050252809 *Dec 22, 2004Nov 17, 2005Aldridge Allen SPackaging design with separate compartments
US20050252817 *Apr 21, 2005Nov 17, 2005Aldridge Allen SPackaging design with separate compartments
US20050255197 *May 9, 2005Nov 17, 2005Cadbury Adams Usa Llc.Gum slab package having insertable product retention member
US20050255198 *May 9, 2005Nov 17, 2005Cadbury Adams Usa Llc.Gum slab package with flap retention
US20050269233 *Jul 1, 2004Dec 8, 2005Aldridge Allen SConfectionary packaging design
US20050284787 *Aug 29, 2005Dec 29, 2005Kopecky Stanley JPackage having releaseably secured consumable products
US20060027483 *Jul 5, 2005Feb 9, 2006Cadbury Adams Usa LlcReclosable consumable product package assembly
US20070136966 *Dec 15, 2005Jun 21, 20073M Innovative Properties CompanyLint remover
US20070209954 *May 14, 2007Sep 13, 2007Cadbury Adams Usa LlcPackaging design with separate compartments
US20080142392 *Dec 28, 2007Jun 19, 2008Cadbury Adams Usa Llc.Package for dispensing and retaining gum slabs with adhesive securement
US20080197178 *May 1, 2008Aug 21, 2008Aldridge Allen SPackaging design with separate compartments
US20090211938 *May 4, 2009Aug 27, 2009Cadbury Adams Usa LlcReclosable consumable product package assembly
US20100143548 *Feb 17, 2010Jun 10, 2010Cadbury Adams Usa LlcGum slab package having insertable product retention member
US20100147934 *Feb 26, 2010Jun 17, 2010Cadbury Adams Usa LlcPackaging design with separate compartments
US20100297288 *Oct 1, 2008Nov 25, 2010Cadbury Holdings LimitedPackaging of a stack of confectionery pellets and the like
US20110101079 *Jan 6, 2011May 5, 2011Cadbury Adams Usa LlcPackaging design with separate compartments
US20110151050 *Jun 23, 2011Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcGum slab package with flap retention
US20110232235 *Sep 29, 2011Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcMethod for forming a package assembly for dispensing and retaining gum slabs with adhesive securement
WO2006014443A1 *Jul 5, 2005Feb 9, 2006Cadbury Adams Usa LlcReclosable consumable product package assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification426/5, 426/119, 426/124
International ClassificationB65D75/38
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/38
European ClassificationB65D75/38