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Publication numberUS1751818 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1930
Filing dateSep 28, 1928
Priority dateSep 28, 1928
Publication numberUS 1751818 A, US 1751818A, US-A-1751818, US1751818 A, US1751818A
InventorsJohn Karitzky
Original AssigneeHenry B Newhall Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bolt anchor
US 1751818 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 25, 1930. I I .J. KARITZKY 1,751,818

BOLT ANCHOR Filed Sept. 28, 1928 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 March 25, 1930. J. KARITZKY 1,751,818

BOLT ANCHOR Filed Sept. '28. 1928 3 Sheets-Sheet -2 ATTORNEY I05 l// /05 1 l /0/ I v r /05 4 /05 I INVENTOR.

March 25, 1930. J. KARITZKY 1,751,818

BOLT ANCHOR Filed Sept. .28, 1928 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Z// v r j Z/ INVENTOR.

' BY 1 l ATTOkNEY Patented Mar. 25, 1930 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE JOHN KARITZKY, OF GARWOOD, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR T HENRY B. NEWHALL CORPORATION, OF GARWOOD, NEW JERSEY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY BOLT ANCHOR Application filed. September 28, 1928. Serial No. 308,929.

My invention relates to bolt anchors and more particularly to a ductile bolt anchor which will permit a particular sized bolt anchor to be used with the greatest possible range of screws or other expanding means,

of different sizes or diameters.

My invention further relates to an article of manufacture, combinations and details of constructions, which will be more fully hereinafter described in the specification and pointed out in the claims.

My invention is to be considered in connection with, and is animprovement upon, United States Letters Patents 1,057,975

Newhall and Pleister, patented April 1, 1918 1,499,071 Pleister, patented June 24, 1924;

1,499,072, Pleister patented June 24, 1924.

In the accompanying drawings showing different illustrative embodiments of my invention, and in which the same reference numerals refer to similar parts in the several figures Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the preferred form of my bolt anchor;

Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the outer end of the bolt anchor;

Fig. 3 is a rear elevation of the inner end of the bolt anchor;

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal vertical section on the line 44 of Fig. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 5 is a transverse vertical section on the line 55 of Fig. 4 looking in the direc tion of the arrows; V

Fig. 6 is a transverse vertical section on the line 66 of Fig. 4, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 7 is a vertical section through a wall or other suitable support. the work and the bolt anchor, a small screwbeing shown cooperating with the bolt anchor;

Fig. 8 is a cross section on line 8-8 of Figure 7 looking in the direction of the arrows; i Fig. 9 is a cross section on line 9-9ofFig.

7 looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 10 is a vertical section illustrating a larger and shorter screw cooperating with the bolt anchor, and not engaging with the supplemental secondary longitudinally extending ribs;

Fig. 11 is a cross-section on line 1111 of Figure 10, looking in the direction of the arrows; V I

Fig. 12 is a vertical section, similar to Figure 10, illustrating a short bridle ring shank cooperating with the bolt anchor;

Fig. 13 is a front elevation of Figure 12;

Fig. 14 is a vertical section, similar'to Figure 6, but of a, modification, in which the exterior longitudinally extending valleys or voids are not in radial alignment with the interior primary ribs, as in the preferred construction, Figures 1 to 11, inclusive;

Figs. 1519 illustrate'another modification. Fig. 15 is a plan of this modification;

Fig. 16 is a front elevation of the outer end of the modification of Figure 15;

Fig. 17 is a rear elevationof the inner end of the modification illustratedin Figure 15; i Fig. 18 is a longitudinal vertical section of the modification illustrated in "Figure 15; I Fig. 19 is a vertical section through a wall or other support, the bolt anchor and the work supported. p

In installing attachments, such as electrical fixtures, insulator brackets, cable clamps, bridle rings, or any form of attachment, which vary in size and duty to be performed, different sizebolt anchorsand particular size screws, to fit the particular size bolt anchor have to be used. 1 Thisrequires a contractor to keep in stock and to send out his mechanics with several sizes of bolt anchors and corresponding sizes of screws, to fit the difierent size bolt anchors. To drill the holes for the ductile bolt anchors, the different size drills to correspond with the particular size ductile anchor, have to be bought'and kept on'hand.

By my presentinvention I permit work, of the greatest possible range, to be held to a wall or other suitable support by a ductile anchor of a. given size. In my present invention, for example, with a given size ductile anchor I may use variable diameters of screws, for example, from #8 to #14. This eliminates the necessity of the contractor car'- rying in stock. ductile anchors of intermediate sizes. This also permits the contractor to equip his mechanics with one size ductile anchor and one size drill to perform practically all the work that they will be required to perform on a given job, which ordinarily would require difierent size bolt anchors and corresponding screws. It will be seen, therefore, that his investment in ductile anchors need be only a few sizes, for each size will accommodate four, five or more sizes of screws, bridle rings or other expanding means. and error on the part of the mechanics in using the wrong bolt anchor, in the wrong place and greatly simplifies the work and reduces the cost of installation.

In addition to the advantages just enumerated, the bolt anchor built in accordance with my invention, has additional advantages among others, to wit (1) It insures an extreme expansion at the inner end of the bolt anchor, beyond what could be had by merely increasing the height of the interior primary longitudinally extending ribs.

(2) It permits the larger size screw, in-

tended for use with my bolt anchor, to turn freely, untilthe supplemental or secondary expanding means is encountered and then, and not until then, will the greatest resistance against turning of the screw be met, which, however, will be at a point where the screw is nearly screwed home. This permits quick installation of the work.

(3) It permits shorter screws of greater than minimum diameter to be easily inserted and obtain a good hold when the screw is not long enough to cooperate with the supplemental or secondary expanding means.

(4:) It permits lower integral primary lon gitudinally expanding ribs at the outer portion of the axial bore, to permit the unthreaded portion of a screw to enter freely without binding, allowing thethread on the screw to cut deeply and with greater expansion at the inner end of the bolt anchor.

(5) It insures a maximum expansion of the bolt anchor before the screw reaches the inner end of the shield, and from that point on produces a long area of maximum expansion with greatly increased holding capacity.

Other advantages will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

In Figures 1 to 11 inclusive, I have shown the preferred form of my invention; in Figure 14 a modification; and in Figures 15 to 19 inclusive, a still further modification, it, of course, being understood that these are merely illustrative.

In the preferred form of my invention, Figures 1-11, my bolt anchor 1 is'preferably formed of lead, or alloy, or other ductile metal and provided with a body member 2, usually in the form of a ring, to which are connected a plurality of tines, two integral tines, 3 and 4' being preferably employed,

My invention also saves confusion' though of course, the number of times may be increased without departing from my invention.

In this preferred form, the exterior of the bolt anchor 1, is provided with a plurality of longitudinally extending grooves or voids 5-5; these grooves preferably increase in depth from the point 6 to the inner end 7 of the bolt anchor. In this preferred form the axial bore 8 of the bolt anchor is provided 7 a with a plurality of longitudinally extending primary ribs 99, which start within the body member or ring 2 and extend to the end 7 .of the bolt anchor. These primary ribs 9, 9 are parallel to the exterior grooves or voids 5-5 and preferably in substantial radial alignment with them. By having the exterior valleys or voids 5, 5 of the greatest depth at the inner end 7 of the bolt anchor, and having the longitudinally extending primary ribs 9, 9 in radial alignment with them, allows for the greatest displacement of the metal of the anchor at the points of greatest expansion, when the largest screws are used. The voids or valleys 5, 5 formed on the exterior, and the voids 10, 10 formed on the interior of the bolt anchor by the longitudinally extending primary ribs 9, 9-will be filled up more, or less, by the metal of the ductile anchor, depending upon the degree ofexpansion employed.

F or example, in using the smallest screw,

or other expanding means, the voids on the interior and exterior of the ductile anchor 1, will not be substantially changed from their original condition, for the small'screw will simply engage with the longitudinally extending primary ribs 9, 9 and in this manner expand the bolt anchor, giving'a firm and strong grip on the interior of the wall or other suitable support. With a larger screw, the metal of the bolt anchor will be more or less displaced, so that the voids 10, 10 on the interiorrand the voids or valleys 5, 5 on the exterior, will be more or less filled up. ith a screw of the maximum diameter, for the particular size bolt anchor, the metal of the bolt anchor will be put under such pressure and so distorted as to substantially fill up all the interior and exterior voids 10 and 5 respectively.

By arranging the exterior valleys or voids 5, 5 parallel to the interior primary longitudinal ribs 9, 9, and in radial alignment with said interior ribs, the metal just back of the ribs will be readily forced radially and fill up the voids formed by said valleys. By arranging the valleys in this manner I also get a bolt anchor of the same strength with less metal, which materially decreases the cost of manufacture.

In addition to the interior primary longitudinal ribs 9, 9, I mount on the interior of the bolt anchor supplemental or secondary expanding means, which are preferably though not necessarily, in the form of one or more supplemental or secondary ribs 11, 11, two being shown by way of example in Figures 1 to 11 inclusive. These supplemental or secondary ribs 11, 11 start adjacent to the inner end 7 of the bolt anchor and extend to a point which is intermediate the inner end 7 and the outer end 12 of the anchor. Preferably they extend to the point 13, thereby choking down the area of the axial bore 8 at this point.

By this construction I obtain the very material advantages in a bolt anchor, previously enumerated herein under the numerals 1 to 5.

. Further, without these supplemental or secondary ribs, 11, 11, higher longitudinally extending primary ribs 9, 9 would be required to give the proper allowance for displacement which would counteract the free act-ion of the screw in the axial bore adjacent the outer end 12. For example, a #14 screw, the largest size for use with this particular size anchor, will turn freely until. its maximum expansion is reached at the supplemental or secondary ribs 11, 11, at which point it will be turned in with greater efiort but with more powerful expansion. When a long #8 screw is used it will receive less support at the outer end 12 where the low primary ribs 9, 9 are purposely placed to permit the unthreaded portion of the #14 screw to pass in freely, but this same #8' screw, which will work quite loosely at the outer end, will obtain a very substantial grip at the inner end due to the supplemental or secondary ribs 11, 11.

It will be clear from Figures 4 and 7 that when the end 16 of a screw, such as 17, reaches the two supplemental or secondary expanding means, in the form of the secondary ribs 11, 11, the area of the axial bore 8, is choked down and the maximum expansion takes place from approximately the points 18, 18 to the inner end 7 ofthe anchor, rather than at the end 7 of the anchor, thereby producing a long area of maximum expansion with greatly increased holding capacity, Figure 7.

I preferably provide the exterior of my anchor l with longitudinally extending ribs 20, 20 to engage with the surface of the hole 21, in a wall or other support 22, formed of masonry, brick, terra cotta, concrete or other similar material, against the surface of which the work 23 is to be supported. My anchor is also preferably provided with the usual slots 24, 24 between the tines 3 and 4 to permit more ready expansion of the anchor.

In Figures 12 and 13, I have shown a.

bridle ring 25 with a short, thick screw threaded shank 26, cooperating with the longitudinally extending primary ribs 9, 9 of the bolt anchor 1, the shank 26, not being long enough to engage with the supplemental or secondary ribs 11, 11. The bridle ring is shown supporting bridle or drop wires 27, 27. In Figure 14 I have shown a modification in which the bolt anchor 101 is provided with the supplemental or secondary longitudinally extending ribs 111, 111, the same as ribs 11, 11 in Figures 1 to 11 inclusive, but the interior longitudinally extending primary ribs 109, 109 are not located in'radial alignment with the exterior longitudinally extending valleys or voids 105, 105.

In Figures 15 to 19 I have shown another modification of my invention.

In this form the bolt anchor 102 is formed of ductile material the same as in the other forms and is provided with a body or ring member slots 31, 31, and short exterior ribs 32, 32. It is also provided with the interior longitudinally extending ribs 209, 209, the same as the primary ribs 9, 9, in the form illustrated in Figures 1 to 11', inclusive. In addition, it is also provided with the supplemental or secondary ribs 211, 211, which are duplicates of the ribs 11, 11 in the first form and perform the same function.

The exterior of the bolt anchor 102 is different from the first and second forms shown respectively in Figures 1 to 13 inclusive, and in Figure 14, in that the longitudinally extending valleys or voids are not employed. Instead, the exterior of the bolt anchor 102 is provided with cross ribs 35, 35, forming cross. valleys or voids 36, 36.

Having thus described this invention in connection with different illustrative embodiments thereof, to the details of which I do not desire to be limited, what is claimed as new and what is desired to secure. by Letters Patent is set forth in the appended claims.

What I claim is: I v i 1. A new article of manufacture comprising a ductile anchor provided with an axial bore and primary interior longitudinally extending expanding means, and secondary interior longitudinally extending expanding a means of'shorter length than the primary expanding means said secondary means being mounted near the inner end of the anchor.

2. A new article of manufacture comprising a ductile anchor provided with an axial bore and primary interior longitudinally extending expanding means, and secondary interior longitudinally extending expanding means of shorter length than the primary expanding means said secondary means being mounted near the inner end of the anchor, and alternating with the primary expanding means.

JOHN KARITZKY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2428676 *Aug 25, 1944Oct 7, 1947Lawrence MooreInsert for molded plastic objects
US2470924 *Aug 29, 1946May 24, 1949South Chester CorpFastening device
US2543683 *Jun 7, 1949Feb 27, 1951U S Expansion Bolt CoExpansion shield
US3362280 *Jun 7, 1966Jan 9, 1968Burdsall & Ward CoPush-on molded plastic cap-fastener
US4083289 *Feb 14, 1977Apr 11, 1978Illinois Tool Works Inc.Plastic fastener
US4085651 *Feb 14, 1977Apr 25, 1978Illinois Tool Works Inc.Plastic fastener
US6116435 *Jul 27, 1998Sep 12, 2000Young; Richard E.Mounting channel member and mounting channel member assembly and anchor fastener therefor
US6276882Jun 30, 2000Aug 21, 2001Richard E. YoungMounting channel member and mounting channel member assembly and anchor fastener therefor
US6679662 *Nov 15, 2001Jan 20, 2004Fischerwerke Artur Fischer Gmbh & Co. KgExpansible plug
US7517182 *Apr 12, 2004Apr 14, 2009Itw Construction Products Italy S.R.IScrew anchor
US8931988 *Mar 19, 2009Jan 13, 2015Nifco Inc.Screw grommet
US20100096792 *Oct 19, 2009Apr 22, 2010Ludwig DemmelerClamping Device
US20110091301 *Mar 19, 2009Apr 21, 2011Nifco Inc.Screw grommet
EP0072031A1 *Aug 10, 1982Feb 16, 1983M. Meisinger KGPlastics dowel for light-weight-construction materials
EP0113893A1 *Dec 15, 1983Jul 25, 1984HILTI AktiengesellschaftPlastic expansion bolt
Classifications
U.S. Classification411/80.5
International ClassificationF16B13/12, F16B13/00
Cooperative ClassificationF16B13/124
European ClassificationF16B13/12B