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Publication numberUS1753403 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 8, 1930
Filing dateMar 30, 1929
Priority dateMar 30, 1929
Publication numberUS 1753403 A, US 1753403A, US-A-1753403, US1753403 A, US1753403A
InventorsJoseph W Cushman, John D Everett, Clinton J Farrell
Original AssigneeJohn F Merrick, W A Teague
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil separator
US 1753403 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' April 8, 1930. J w, cus ET AL OIL SEPARATOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 iled March 50, 1929 Inventor) ,JW Gmrmorr IQ Eye/M77 C, I far-re Mal.

Attorney Patented Apr. 8, 1930 UNITED STATES PATENT OFF-ICE JOSEPH W. CUSHMAN, JOHN D. EVERETT,

MERRICK AND TEXAS, ASSIGNORS TO JOHN F.

AND CLINTON J. FARRELL, OF VERNON, W. A. .TEAGUE, BOTH OF WICHITA.

COUNTY, TEXAS, R. E. L. SANER, SAID FARRELL AND SAID EVERETT OIL SERARATOR Application filed MarchBO, 1929. Serial No. 851,398.

This invention relates to improvements to what is known in the art as an oil separator. p

The primary object of the invention is to provide an improved oil separator whereby 6 crude oil from the Well will be thoroughly cleansed and freed of water and other foreign substances prior to its reception into supply tanks. 1 A further object of the invention is to pro- 1 vide a device, whereby the oil from a plurality of wells is admitted into a single 011 separator and there to be freed of Water and al foreign and impure substances in a thorough and novel manner, and then to be discharge and conveyed to the reservoir tank.

Another .salient object of the invention is to provide an oil separator which is simple in construction, inexpensive, thoroughly efficient in use.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from a study of the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a vertical section taken through practical, an

' the tank showing my improved separating means.

Figure 2 is a sectional view, taken on the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a sectional view, line 33 of Figure 1.

With reference more in detail to the draw ings, it will be seen thatmy improved sepataken on the rator embodies a cylindrical tank generally 8 the reference, character 5 and of spaced inner and outer spaced so as to designated by comprising a pair walls 6 and 7 respectively, provide an inner chamber 8, her 9. The cylindrical tank 5 is further provided with the usual bottom 10 and top 11. The upper portion of the tank 5 is provided with a receiving head 12 adapted to receive the crude oil from a plurality of wells through an intake exhaust 13, extending inwardly thereof as at14, which intake 13 leads from an intake chamber 15, suitably supported on the cylinder 5 by means of thebracket 16 and into which the oil is conducted from the -respective well by means of intake conduits 17.

The top 11 of the tank is rovided with an 50 opening 18, while a funne shaped member d at 25.

and outer cham- 19 is formed integral with the top 11 and deends inwardly into the inner chamber 8. The funnel shaped member 19 has its flared mouth 20 formed integral with the top 11 adjacent the opening 18 as at 21. It is to be understood, of course that the receiving head 12 communicates with this opening 18 and consequently with the flared funnel shaped member 19. A vertical shaft 22 has one end journaled in the top wall of the cylinder head 12 within journal bearings l 23 and the other end of the shaft 22 journaled in the bottom end of a sediment trap 24, as

The sediment trap 24 will be hereinafter more fully described. The shaft 22, it is to be noted, is supported in a bearing 26, which bearing 26 is suitably supported in the d mouth of the funnel member 19 by means of brackets 27.

The funnel shaped member 19 terminates adjacent its lower end in the sediment trap 24, which trap 24; is formed preferably integral with the funnel 19 and is substantially conical in formation and having at its apex the bearing 25 in which is journaled the shaft 22, as before set'forth.

Fixed to the shaft 22, and located within the receiving head 12 is a power wheel 28, and is constructed of sectionalized bands having three circular sections A, B, and C, provide with alternating bands 29,'against which the oil from the intake exhaust 13, impinges for rotating the shaft 22. Fixed to the shaft and in spaced relation is a plurality of cutting blades 30,10cated within the funnel 19 and adapted to rotate therein during actuation of the shaft 22. Within the sediment trap 24, that portion of the shaft dependingtherein carries a plurality of cutting blades 31, raduating in size with the smallest of the b lades disposed adjacent the apex of the chamber. Thus it will be seen that the crude oil upon striking the'bands 29 to operate the wheel 28 will, by gravity, flow through the funnel 19 and there be further broken up and forced mouth of the downwardly by the rotation of the cutters 30,

the force of the outlet 38 formed in the the inner chamber member 39. This in the crude oil settles, the sediment settling in the bottom of the trap and the oil and Water rising to be forced out of the trap through the outlet pipe into the inner or what may be termed the oil chamber 8. I

The oil and water having collected in the chamber 8, the oil will seek the higher level and direct its course upwardly against the retarders or baflie plates 33, which plates are hingedly connected to the funnel 19 and the said plates adapted to extend downwardly and outwardly from the funnel with their free ends terminating in spaced relation to the inner walls 7. The plates 33 are preferably of triangular formation and radiate from the funnel in spaced relation. These plates are preferably arranged in series and each of said series comprising a plurality of the plates arranged one above the other and in spaced relation to each other. See Figures 1 and 3. Suitable brackets 35 connect the free ends of the bafile plates 33 with the inner wall 7 for bracing the plates when in their extended position. 'The oil' then rises upwardly in the chamber 8 between the individual plates and the inner wall of the chamber, freeing itself of the water which settles in the bottom of the chamber to be dis-.

charged from the chamber to a plurality of openings 36, formed in the wall 7 adjacent the bottom 10 of the tank to rise within the outer chamber 9, being finally discharged through the water outlet pipe 37, communicating with the chamber adjacent the upper end of the tank 5, the oil rising within the chamber 8, forcing its way between the baffle plates to be finally discharged through the upper end of the tank 5 and communicating with the chamber 8. A U-shaped member 39 in the form of a ring fits closely around and on the inside of 8, the inside wall of the U being curved outwardly toward the center of the inner chamber to provide a cutting edge for the purpose of cutting the thinnest film of oil from whatever water may remain in the oil during its rise within the chamber. The U-shapcd member is suspended from the top of the cylinder 5 by a plurality of flexible links 40 to permit u ward movement of the IF-shaped member 39 I will hereinafter refer to as a cutting edge and is ada ted to be kept in position at all times to talie off the thinnest film of oil and at the same time being capable of rising with the oil to revent the oil and water pressure from forclng the oil over the cutter, that would not be free from the water.

The basic settlements and all foreign substances are solid found in the oil and which settle in the trap and are discharged there from by gravitation to a discharge pipe 41, leadin from the lower end of the trap 'throug the walls 6 and 7 as at 6' and 7 respectively.

as at 34, 1

The discharge 41 is provided with the usual valve 42, the purpose of which is apparent.

Such gas as may be present at the time oil is discharged from the intake pipe 17 into the intake chambers 15 and finally into the receiving head 12 to be discharged against the power wheel 28 will be readily relieved through the pressure of valves 46 on the outet pipe rising from the receiving head.

It is yet to be mentioned that a bracket 43 rises from the bottom 10 'and is riveted or otherwise secured as at 44, to the trap 24 adjacent the apex of the trap. This bracket 24 tends to hold the funnel 19 and trap 24 rigid within the chamber 8. i

It is though that the construction, operation, and advantages of this invention will be clearly understood Without a more detailed description thereof. The present embodi ment of the invention has been disclosed in detail merely by way of example and it is apparent that changes in the details of construction and the combination and arrangement of parts may be resorted to, without departing from the spirit of the invention and the scope of the claims without sacrificing any of its advantages.

Having thus described my invention, what I wish to claim is:

1. In a device of the class described, a cylindrical tank comprising a pair of spaced walls dividing the same into an inner and outer'chamber, a receiving head formed on the top of the tank and provided with an opening, an intake funnel formed centrally of and depending from the top of the cylinder into said inner chamber and communicating with the opening in the receiving head, a trap formed on the lower end of said funnel, a shaft journaled in the funnel and extending into the head and trap, cutting blades on the shaft and located within the funnel and trap, a power wheel on the upper end of the shaft and adapted to rotate within said receiving head.

2. In an oil separator of the class described, a cylindrical tank comprising a pair of spaced walls dividing the same into an inner and outer chamber, an oil receiving head formed on the top of the tank and provided with an opening, an intake funnel formed centrally of and depending from the top of the cylinder into said inner chamber and communicating with the openin in the receiving head, an intake chamber isposed on the top of the tank and communicating with said intake head, means for supplying oil to the intake chamber, a shaft journaled in the funnel and extending into the head, a power wheel on the upper end of the shaft, said power wheel being provided with a plurality of bands radiating therefrom and against which the oil from the intake chamher is adapted to impend for operating the wheel, a plurality of blades carried by the shaft and located within said funnel, a trap formed at the lower end of the furinel to receive the oil in its passage through the funnel, and overflow pipes associated with the trap and communicating with the inner chamber.

3. In an oil separator of the class described, a cylindrical tank comprising a pair of spaced walls dividing the same into an inner and outer chamber, an oil receiving head formed on the top-of the tank and provided with an opening, an intake funnel formed centrally of and depending from the top of the cylinder into said inner chamber and communicating with the openin in the receiving head, an intake chamber isposed on the top of the tank and communicating with said intake head, means for supplying oil to the intake chamber, a shaft journaled in the funnel and extending into the head, a power wheel on the upper end of the shaft, said power wheel being provided with a plurality of bands radiating therefrom and against which the oil from the intake chamber is adapted to impend for operating the wheel, a plurality of blades carried by the shaft and located within said funnel, a trap formed at the lower end of the funnel to receive the oil in its passage through the funnel, and overflow pipes associated with the communicating with the inner chamber, baflle plates within said inner chamber and su ported by said funnel and said inner cham er being provided with an oil outlet formed adjacent the upper end of the tank.

4. In an oil separator of the class detrap and scribed, a cylindrical tank comprising a pair of spaced walls dividing the same into an inner and outer chamber, an oil receiving head rising from the top of said tank, an intake funnel formed centrally of and depending from the top of the cylinder into said inner chamber, and said funnel communicating with said oil receiving head, said funnel terminating at its inner end in a conical shaped oil receiving trap, a shaft journaled in the funnel and extending into said head andtrap, a power wheel carried by the shaft and located within said oil receiving head, said wheel comprising a plurality of -bands radiating therefrom and against which the oil is adapted to impend for rotating the wheel, cutting blades on the shaft and located within the funnel and trap, means for directing the oil from the trap into said inner chamber, baflie plateswithin said inner chamber and supported by said chamber formed in the tank adjacent the top of said tank, and said inner wall being provided with a plurality of spaced openings adjacent the bottom thereof communicating with said outer chamber, and a water outlet portion for said outer chamber.

5. In a device of the character described,

naled in said funnel and extending into the head and trap, cutting blades on the shaft and located within the funnel and trap, a power wheel on the upper end of the shaft adapted to rotate within said on receiving head, said trap being provided with overfiow pipes extending into said inner chamber, drain means associated with the trap and extending outwardly of the cylinder, baflie plates within said inner chamber, a plurality of openings formed on said inner wall and communicating with said outer chamber, an outlet for said outer chamber, an outlet for said inner chamber formed in the tank adjacent the top of the tank, and a substantially ring-like member dependin inwardly of the inner chamber adjacent sai outlet.-

6. In a device of the class described, a tank, an oil receiving head associated with the tank at the upper end thereof, an 011 rebeing provided with a plurality of cutting blades for agitating the oil during its flow through the conduits.

7. In a device of the class described, a cylindrical tank comprising a pair of spaced walls dividing the same into anouter chamber, an oil receivin head formed on the top of the cylinder an having an o ening provided therein, an intake funnel ormed centrally of and depending from the top of the cylinder into said chamber and communicating with the opening in the receiving head, a trap formed on the lower end of said fun-' nel, overflow pipes for the trap extending into said inner end chamber, a drain leading from the trap and extending outwardly of said tank, a shaft journaled in the funnel and extending intothe head and trap, cutting blades on the shaft located within the funnel and trap, a power wheel on the upper end of the shaft having a plurality of alternately arranged spaced bands radiating therefrom,

means for rotating the wheel for actuatingthe shaft, baflie plates extending from the funnel and projecting downwardly and outwardly therefrom, the free ends of said baffles terminating in spaced relation from said 3 inner walls, a plurality of openings formed in said inner walls adjacent the bottom of said walls, outlets for the respective chambers, a substantially ring-like member of U-shaped formation in cross section fitting 1o loosely around the inside of said inner chamber adjacent its outlet, means for suspendin said member from the top of said tank. an% the inner wall of said ring-like u-shaped member being curved outwardly toward the center of said inner chamber.

In testimony whereof we aflix our signatures.

JOSEPH W. GUSHMAN. 'JOHN DIEVERETT. CLINTON J. FARRELL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2491801 *Jun 5, 1946Dec 20, 1949Debrey MichaelCentrifugal liquid cleaner
US2755933 *Jan 19, 1954Jul 24, 1956Profit William BFuel purifier
US5116492 *Oct 2, 1990May 26, 1992YakutniproalmazApparatus for clarification of industrial sewage
US6845821 *Jul 6, 2001Jan 25, 2005Shell Oil CompanyApparatus and method for downhole fluid separation
US20030116316 *Jul 6, 2001Jun 26, 2003Bouma Jelle SipkeApparatus and method for downhole fluid separation
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/521, 210/542
International ClassificationB01D17/02
Cooperative ClassificationB01D17/0208
European ClassificationB01D17/02F