Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1755733 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 22, 1930
Filing dateJan 14, 1928
Priority dateJan 14, 1928
Publication numberUS 1755733 A, US 1755733A, US-A-1755733, US1755733 A, US1755733A
InventorsRiekert Henry, Hager William
Original AssigneeRiekert Henry, Hager William
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air-moistening device for combustion engines
US 1755733 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 22, 1930.

w. HAGER ET AL 1,755,733

AIR

MOISTENING DEVICE FOR COMBUSTION ENGINES Filed Jan. 14, 1928 Patente pr. 22, 1930 STATES AIB-MOISTENING DEVICE FOR COMBUSTION ENGINES Application filed January 14, 1928. Serial No. 246,834.

This invention relates to a device for moistenin air rior to the entry thereof into the cylin ers an internal combustion engine or other device to which it is desired to supply moist air.

An object of the invention is to provide an air moistener which, due to the arrangement and construction of the various parts thereof, will be more eflicient than devices of this class heretofore in use.

Another object is to provide a device for the purpose stated which is simple and trouble-proof.

Another object is to provide a device of 1 this kind which will automatically supply ample moisture at all times.

These and other objects are attained by the means described herein and disclosed by the accompanying drawings, in which:-

Fig. 1 is a side elevation, partly in cross section, of the device as used in connection'w th a carburetor and intake manifold of an internal combustion engine.

The air moistening device of this invention is adapted for use with internal combustion engines. The purpose of the air moistening device is to rovide moisture for the air drawn into a car uretor by the suction of the engine. As shown in the drawing, the device may be attached to the inlet port of any carburetor. The device comprises generally an inner bowl 4, an outer bowl 5, a float 6 having associated therewith a needle valve, a uantity of wick material 7 which may be held in position by a screen 8, a fluid supply tank or reservoir 9, and a suitable hood 10, all of which will be set forth in detail presently. The inner bowl 4 is preferably of a cylindrical shape and is provided with a top 11 and a bottom 12. The cylindrical wall 13 is provided with perforations 14 which provide communication with the outer bowl 5. Said bowl 5 is preferably cylindrical in shape, and encircles the inner bowl 4. The wall 15 of the outer bowl is spaced from the cylindrical wall of the inner bowl so as to provide an annular channel 16 into which fluid from the inner bowl may enter.

A connecting member 17 provided with screw t eads 1.8, is secured to the bott m 12 of the inner bowl. The connectin member is provided with a central bore 19 aving communication with a pipe 20-which carries fluid from the supply tank or reservoir 9. By this means the fluid may enter the bowls 4 and 5. If desired a suitable stop cook 21 may be provided for rendering the device inoperative.

Means com rising a float and needle valve are provided or controlling the rate of flow of the liquid into the bowls. Said control means comprises a float 22 having a central longi tudinal bore 23 for receiving a reciprocable needle 24, the lower end of'which is pointed. Said pointed end of the needle is adapted to enter the bore 19 in the connecting member for impeding the flow of fluid when the float rises to a predetermined level. The connection between the float and the needle comprises an annular grooved collar 25 fixedly secured upon the needle. A plurality of bell crank levers 26 are pivotally secured'to the inside surface of the to 11, and are pro vided with free ends 27 w ich are received in the grooved collar on the needle. It should be noted that as the float moves upwardly, it will abut the lever 26 at a point 28, thereby turning the lever 26 about its pivotal mounting.

The arm of the lever received by the collar 25 will then be moved downwardly for moving the needle point into position for closing the bore 19. A suitable bushing 29 and cap 30 insure alignment and protection to the needle 24 at its upper end.

A quantity of wick material 7 which may be a sponge or other capillary substance is positione upon the top 11 of the inner bowl and extends downwardly intothe channel 16 provided between the walls of the inner and outer bowl. As shown in the drawing, the fluid 31 rises in the outer bowl to a hei ht determined by the float 6. The portion 0 wick material extending into the channel is immersed in the liquid, causing saturation of the entire wick by capillary attraction. The screen 8 is positioned over the wick and recludes displacement thereof. Any suita le means such as screws 32 may be provided for securing the screen to the outer bowl wall.

The hood 10 is provided at one end with an enlarged opening 33 into which the wick por- At the opposite end of the hood there is prois of a size suflicient to provide an air channe 34 above and about the wick. If desired suitable baiiie lates 35 may be provided upon the inside sur ace of the hood for deflecting the incoming air toward the wick material, whereby the moistening of said air is efltected.

vided an opening 36 which communicates with the inlet port 37 of any carburetor 38. The carburetor 38 is connected with the usual in take manifold 39 by means of bolts 40. Any suitable means may be provided for retaining the hood in position upon the carburetor in take port. In the drawing a spring 41 is utilized for the purpose. The spring is so sha as to contact a lug 42 on the hood, whereby 'splacement of the hood is precluded. v

Any suitable means such as screws 43 may be provided for securing the bowl and sponge elements upon the hood 10. .It'is evident that as air is drawn into the carburetor through the channel 34 of the hood itwill strikethe moistened wick material and become saturated before entry thereof into the engine. Great efficienc is obtained because of the construction 0 this device which presents a compara-- tively large moistening. surface for theincoming air. It is to be understood that various modifications may be made in the structural details of the device without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. What is claimed is: 1. In a device of the class described the combination of an inner bowl provided withtop, bottom and side walls, an outer bowl communicating with and extending about the inner bowl and forming therewith an annular channel, a bored connection member secured to the bottom wall and adapted for direct' fluid mm a fluid reservoir, means for controlling the flow of said fluid, comprising a reciprocable needle one end of which may gzqect into the bore of the connection memr for closing said bore, a float provided with a longitudinal bore through which the needle may extend, a collar on the needle, levers pivotaly mounted on the inner bowl and actuable by the float for exerting a downward force on the collar and needle for moving the needletoward the bore of the connection member, means for retainingthe needle in alignment with the bore of the connection member, a quantity of wick material superimposed upon the to of the inner bowl and extending downwar y into the fluid channel for saturation of the wick, and means for directing air toward the wick prior to the entry of said air into an "internal combustion engine.

2. In a device of-theclass described the combination of an inner bowl provided with top, bottom andside walls, an outer bowl communicating withand extend ng about through the bore thereof a quantity of the inner bowl and forming therewith an annular channel, a bored connection member secured to the bottom wall and adapted for directin through the bore thereof a quand nection member, means for retaining the needle in ali I ent with the bore of the connection mem r, a'quantity of wick material superimposed upon the top of the inner bowl and extending downwardly into the fluid channel for saturation of the wick, a hood having an enlarged open end-and a smaller open end, the enlarged open end being adapted to freely receive the wick portion of the device so as to provide an air passage about said wick portion, and'theother end of the hood being adapted for connection to a carburetor inlet port, whereby air drawn through the hood into the carburetor port may be moisteneletd by the passage thereof over the moist .w1c

3. In a device. of the class described the combination of an inner bowl provided with a top, an outer bowl communicating with and extending about the inner bowl and forming therewith an annular channel, means associated wi h the inner bowl for directing thereinto flui from a fluid reservoir, a float operated valve for controlling entry of the fluid into the inner bowl, a quantity of wick material supported upon the top of the inner bowl and extending downwardly into the channel whereby the fluid in the channel may saturate the wick, and a hood having communication with a carburetorinlet port and positioned over the wick material for directmg air, passing through the hood, against the saturated wick material prior to entry of the air into the carburetor.

4. In a device of the class described the combination of an inner bowl provided with a. top, an outer bowl communicating with and extending about the inner bowl and forming therewith an annular channel, means associated with the inner bowl for directing thereinto fluid from a fluid reservoir, a float operated valve for controlling entry of the fluid wick material for directing air, passing through the hood, against the saturated wick material prior to entry of the air into the carburetor.

5. In a device of the class described, the

combination of an inner bowl, and an'outer bowl having communication therewith, means associated with the inner bowl for directing into the inner bowl fluid from a fluid supply reservoir, :1. float operated valve within the inner bowl for controlling the quantity of fluid admitted to the bowl, a quantity oi wick material extending into and above the outer bowl and adapted for saturation with the fluid, and a hood having communication with a carburetor inlet port and positioned over the wick material for directing air, pass-- ing through the hood, against the saturated wick material, whereby to. moisten the air before entry thereof into the carburetor.

- In testimony whereof, we have hereunto subscribed our names this 12 day of Jannary, 1928. v

WILLIAM HAGER. HENRY RIEKERT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2422402 *Nov 16, 1943Jun 17, 1947Gazda AntoineHumidifier for carbureters
US2587197 *Apr 5, 1948Feb 26, 1952Mousel Canellen KCooling system for motor vehicles
US2594636 *Apr 25, 1945Apr 29, 1952Gazda AntoineHumidifier
US2598465 *Jan 14, 1947May 27, 1952Raymond G ThomasVapor injector
US2615435 *Jan 18, 1950Oct 28, 1952Riley Stoker CorpControl of steam temperature
US5312566 *Sep 9, 1992May 17, 1994American Technologies Group, Inc.Air intake system device
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/99, 261/18.2
International ClassificationF02M1/00, F02M25/022
Cooperative ClassificationF02M1/00, F02M2700/4321
European ClassificationF02M1/00