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Publication numberUS1756579 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1930
Filing dateMar 26, 1928
Priority dateMar 26, 1928
Publication numberUS 1756579 A, US 1756579A, US-A-1756579, US1756579 A, US1756579A
InventorsWisner Abram C
Original AssigneeReynolds Spring Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Base frame for spring-cushion seats
US 1756579 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 29, 1930. A, QQVISNER 4 1,756,579

' BASE FRAME FOR SPRING C SHION SEATS Y Filed March 26, 1928 attozncqa Patented Apr. 29, 1930 unite stares rr-ice ABBA NFC. VIISNER, 0F JACKSON, MICHIGAN, ASSIGNOR 'I'O REYNOLDS SPRING COM IPAN'Y, or JACKSON, MICHIGAN,

A CORPORATION OF MICHIGAN BASE FRAME FOR SPRING-CUSHION SEATS which serves as the anchoring member for the springs and for the enclosing apron. Numerous devices of this general character are already known in the art, but the object of the present invention is to provide a base frame which simplifies the mode of assembly and saves time in the assembly operations.

The prior art devices generally consist of a double channel member which receives the cushion springs in one channel and the lower edge of the apron in the other channel. Usually the apron is received in the lower channel, and the result of this construction is that the springs constantly exert pressure on a portion of the apron whereby the latter is likely to become weakened and worn. The interposition of the apron-receiving channel between the supporting structure and the spring-receiving channel further adds to the height of the cushion. Added height of such parts in automobile construction is obj ectionable inasmuch as it is desired to retain as much head room as possible, consistent, with the present custom which favors low top vehicles.

These objections are overcome in the present invention by securing the springs in the lower channel and anchoring the lower edge of the apron in the upper channel. It will readily be apparent that this arrangement avoids the added height of .the seat and the strain 011 the lower part of the apron occasioned by anchoring the apron below the sprin Figure 4 is a fragmentary perspectivev view of ti): base frame;

Figure 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of the lower part of the apron; and

Figure 6 is a cross section of the base frame.

Reference to these views will now be made by use of like characters which are employed to designate corresponding parts throughout.

The base frame is a metallic member having the contour of the lower edge of the seat and bent to form an inwardly facing channel 1 and an outwardly facing channel 2. The member thus bent has the appearance of a reversed S in cross section as viewed in the several figures, although it would be of obverse S-shape if viewed in the opposite direction. o

The lower wall 3 of the lower channel 1 is flat in order to provide a flat bearing upon the supporting surface as will presently appear, while the upper wall 4 of the upper channel 2 is sloped downwardlyto form a comparatively restricted mouth for a pur-, pose'presently to bedescribed. The free edge of the wall 4 is rounded or bent back upon itself as at 5 in order to avoid cutting orsevering the fabric which comes into engage- V ment therewith.

The usual helical springs 6 confined within the base frame have their lower coils received in the lower channel 1 as illustrated more clearly in Figures 2 and 3. he lower wall edge 10' secured to the base of the pad and v fitted between this-base and the upper coils of the springs 6. The'lower edgeof the apron is folded upon itself as at '11 in orderto enclose a welt cord 12 which isretainedby stitching 13 along the doubled part of the apron.

For the'purpose ofsecuring the lower edge oofthe apron in the base fran' e', the cushion is compressed in a. suitable machinein order that the apron may be 'sufiiciently slack, -,with

respect to the base frame, to permit manipulation of the lower edge thereof.

The welted edge is inserted in the upper cord, is also inse'rte'd'in the upper channel and iv at is retained by the spring action which results fromthe further restriction of the mouth of the channel by the juxtaposition of the douled part of the apron against the upper wall of the channel. The usual operation of pinchin the channel by means of a tool in order to hold the lower edge of the apron is thus avoided. It will also be seen that the sharp edge of the channel is removed from the apron, due to the bend 5, so that the, apron cannot be cut in this region.

The above mentioned advantages of the in vention will now be apparent. 'Due to the fact that the springs 6 are received in the lower channel, there is provided a flat metal bearing upon the supporting surface. The anchoring of the lower end of theapron above the base of thesprings prevents the apron from being compressed beneath the springs and further reduces the height of the cushion by the width of the welt-receiving channel.

Although a specific embodiment of the invention has been illustratedand described, it will be understood that various alterations in the details of construction may be made without departing from the scope of the invent-ion as indicated by the appended claims.

What I claim 1s 1. In an upholstery construction, a base frame consisting of a double channel member, one channel being above the'other, cushion springs secured in the lower channel, up-

. holsterymaterial mounted upon said springs,

an apron depending from said material and renclosi'ng said springs, a welt cord attached 7 to the lower edge of said apron and received 7 said welt cord.

. in said upper channel, and a lockingmember cured in the inwardly facing channel, up:

holstery material mounted upon said springs, an apron dependlng from said material and enclosing said spr1ngs,;a welt cord secured to z the lower edge of said apronand received I in'said outwardly facing channel, and a lock ing member sprung in said outwardly facing channel for retaining sald welt cord.

3. In an. upholstery construction, a base frame consisting of a double channel member having an upper outwardly facingfchannel and a lower inwardly facing channel, cushion springs secured in the lower channel, upholstery material mounted on said springs, an

apron hanging" from said material'and enclosing said springs, a welt cord secured to the lower edge of said apron and received in said upper channel, and a locking member sprung in said upper channel for retaining said welt cord. g

i. In an upholstery construction, a base frame consisting of a. double channel member, one channel being above the other, a cushion spring structure secured in the lower channel, upholstery material mounted upon said spring structure, an apron depending from said material and enclosing said spring structure, a welt cord attached to the lower edge of said apron and received in said upper channel, and a locking member sprung in said upper channel for retaining said welt cord.

In testimony whereof I aiiix my signature.

' ABRAM C. WISNER.

' loo lcs

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4364607 *Jul 28, 1980Dec 21, 1982Gilardini S.P.A.Seat for vehicles
US4370002 *Jun 12, 1980Jan 25, 1983Kimball International, Inc.Attachment for chair arm
US4396226 *Nov 5, 1980Aug 2, 1983Denack Design CorporationStructural component assembly for upholstered furniture and method of making
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/404
International ClassificationB60N2/70
Cooperative ClassificationB60N2/7041
European ClassificationB60N2/70W4B