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Publication numberUS1760536 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 27, 1930
Filing dateMar 8, 1928
Priority dateMar 25, 1926
Publication numberUS 1760536 A, US 1760536A, US-A-1760536, US1760536 A, US1760536A
InventorsBaldwin Earl F, Woods Frank E
Original AssigneeAmerican Fibre Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for making fiber reed
US 1760536 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 27, 1930.

' E, F. BALDWIN ET AL MACHINE FOR MAKING FIBER REED Original- Filed March 25, 1926 5 Sheets-Sheet l glwvewtow mwN WWN I u -Hm W a 31 w v JIJI. I J ll... 1" o E illlllliilmm 5271-2715042 aw m It 1 7* 61mm 7 May 27, 1930.

E. F. BALDWIN El L MACHINE FOR MAKING FIBER REED,

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MACHINE FOR MAKING, FIBER REED Original Filed March 25, 1926 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 gvwemtow May 27,' 1.930. E. F. BALDWIN ET L MACHINE FOR MAKING FIBER REED Original Filed March 25. 1926 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 y 1 E. F. BALDWIN ETAL.

MACHINE FOR MAKING FI BER REED 1 Original Filed March 25 1926 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented May 27, 1930 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE EARL F. BALDWIN AND FRANK E. WOODS, OF GARDNER, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNORS TO AMERICAN FIBRE CORPORATION, OF GARDNER, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORA TION or MASSACHUSETTS MACHINE nonlvmxme FIBER REED Original application filed March 25, 1926,Serial No. 97,468, Patent No. 1,680,358. Divided and this application filed March 8, 19538. Serial No. 260,15'7.

This application is a division of our orig inal application Serial No.97fi68, filed March 25, 1926, patented August 14th, 1928, Patent No. 1,680,358.

This invention relates to a machine for manufacturing fiber reed product which has come into wide use as a substitute for fiat reed in weavlng coverings for baby carrlages and other similar artlcles.

fiber, such as kraft paper, is first folded lengthwise, and the folded paper is then firm- 1y pressed into the form of a straight strip of fiber reed of reduced width but of increased thickness. The strip is gum-med to preserve its tightly folded condition.

It is the general object of our invention to provide an improved machine for the manufacture of such fiber reed, said machine involving many novel features of construction and operation, and having its component parts assembled to form fiber reed bya new and improved process.

One important feature of our invention relates to the provision of an improved mechanism for folding, breaking down and pressing the fiber soon after it enters the machine.

Our invention also relates to means for controlling the feed of fiber to the folding mechanism. to means for securinga uniform width of finished reed, and to an improved means for unfolding the folded reed preparatory to gumming or gluing.

Other features of the general machine assembly are included in other applications and patents filed with the original application.

Our invention further relates -to certain arrangements and combinations of parts which will be hereinafter described and more particularly'pointed out in the appended claims.

A preferred form of theinvention is shown in the drawings in which Fig. 1 is a plan view of our improved machine for making fiber reed;

Fig.2 is a front elevation thereof;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the fiber supply mechanism or reel;

Fig. 4 is a partial side elevation thereof,

1n the manufacs; ture of such fiber reed, a strip of strong heavy looking in the direction of the arrow 4 in Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a detail end elevation of the re tarding and friction device, looking in the direction of the arrow 5 in Fig. 4.;

Figs. 6 and 7 are a side and plan of the parts shown inFig. 5, looking in the direction of the arrow 6 and 7 in said figure;

Fig. 8 is a detailed sectional view showing one of the roll supports;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged plan view of the folding, unfolding, and gumming mechanism forming a portion of our improved machine Fig. 10 is a sectional elevation of the same parts, taken along the line 10-10 in Fig. 9

Fig. 11 is a transverse sectional elevation, taken along the line 11-11 in Fig. 10;

Fig. 12 is a partial end elevation of a belt tightening device by which the operation ,of the machine is controlled, ta'kenalong the line 12- 12 in Fig. 2;

Fig. 13 is an enlarged longitudinal section showing the folding, pressing and sizing mechanism; i

Fig. 14 is a detail plan view of the parts of the foldingmechanism, lookingin the direction ofthe arrow 14.- in Fig. '13;

Fig. 1 5 is an end elevation, looking in the direction of the arrow 15 in Fig. 1-3; p

Fig516 is a partial end elevation of the guic le-plates for the presser rolls, lookingin the direction of'thearrow 16 in Fig. 13;

Fig. 17 is an end view of one of the folding trumpets, looking in the direction of the arrow '17 in Fig. 13;

Fig.18 is asectional plan view of the tru1npet,taken along the line 18-18=in Fig. 17;

19 is a plan view of one of the unfolding devices;

Fig. 20 is a side elevation thereof, taken along the line 2020 inFig. 19;

Fig. 21 is a plan View of a guide and scraper by which surplus gum is removed from the fiber strip, and

Figs. 22, 23, 24 and 25 aresectional views illustrating successive steps in the folding and unfolding .of .the ungummed fiber.

improved reed-making machine will be more easily understood after a brief consideration of the general system of operation. Referring to Fig. 1, our improved machine comprises a series of co-operating mechanism as follows :A fiber supplying mechanism A, a

folding mechanism-B, a pressing and sizing mechanism C, an unfolding mechanism D, a gumming and scraping mechanism E, a drying portion F, a refolding and repressing mechanism G, and a winding mechanism H.

The fiber is supplied in the form of large rolls R, each comprising a very great length of fiber of a comparativelynarrow width. A

fiber isthen unfolded by the mechanism D.

and in its unfolded condition passes over the gumming cylinder in the mechanism E and is then drawn past the scraper to remove the surplus gum or glue.

The gumming mechanism E and the refolding and repressing mechanism G are spaced substantially apart to provide a drying portion F in which the freshly gummed fiber has a chance to partially dry and become very sticky or tacky before it passes through the refolding and repressing mechanlsm In this mechanism, a pair of cooperating folding rolls, preferably mounted on vertical axes, are provided for loosely refolding the fiber reed, after which it is drawn through a second set of grooved and ribbed presser rolls by which it is again sized and firmly pressed and from which it is delivered infinished condition to the winding mechanism H.

The fiber from which the reed is made is of stiff and heavy material and it has been found impractical tovgum and fold the fibre at asingle operation. We have discovered, however, that very satisfactory results may be obtained by first folding and firmly pressing the fibre in an ungummed condition, thus breaking down the fiber at the fold lines, and by thereafter unfoldin gumming, refolding and repressing the fiber to form the finished reed.

Having thus described the general system and operation of our improved machines, we will now describe the different mechanisms contained therein.

Supply mechanism The suplply mechanism A is indicated generally in igs. 1 and 2 and is shown in detail in Figs. 3 to 8 inclusive. Each roll R is mounted upon a stud (Fig. 8) in the side of a supporting bar 41 which is detachably secured in position by cross bars 42 and 43 mounted in fixed position on the frame M of the machine.

The supporting bars 41 are provided with notches as indicated in Fig. 2 to fit the cross bars 42 and 43. Any one of the bars 41 may be easily removed by raising the outer end of the bar and then removing the same endwise from the supporting frame. In this way, any one of the rolls B .may be quickly and easily replaced. I

We have also provided means for frictionaliy retarding the feed from each separate roll R. For this purpose, we provide weights 44 having grooves 45 in their side faces to receive guide rods 46 fixed in the supporting bars 41 and extending upwardly therefrom. A tie rod 47 joins the two outer rods 46 and holds the entire series of weights in the desired relationship. Friction springs 49 are pivoted at 50 on each weight 44 and yielding ly engage the two parallel sides of the roll R, the springs being self-centering on their pivots 50.

As the rolls decrease in size, the weights 44 slide downward between the guide rods 46 and the springs 49 retain their operative frictional relation to the rolls R. Rotation of the rolls is thus retarded both by the yield ing pressure of the springs 49 and by the gravity pressure of the weights 44.

Folding mechanism The strips S of fiber are drawn from the rolls R and are then acted upon by the folding mechanism B shown generally in Figs. 9 and 10 and in detail in Figs. 13 to 18.

Our improved folding mechanism comprises a series of trumpets mounted in a cross bar 56 detachably secured to the frame M by bolts 57 (Fig. 9) extending through notches at the ends of the cross bar 56.

The trumpets 55 are preferably formed of porcelain or some other vitrified product and are each provided with a recess 66 of the peculiar section and outline indicated in Figs.

17 and 18, the walls of said recess being so disposed that the fiber strip S, which leaves the roll R in the flat condition indicated in Fig. 22, will be delivered from the trumpet 55 in the partially folded condition indicated in Fig. 23. I

A plug or anvil 58 is provided for each trumpet '55, the anvil being of substantial circular cross section and having a tapered and rounded outer end projecting into the open rear end of its trumpet 55 as indicated in Fig. 13. Each anvil 58 is mounted on a bracket 59 which is forked at its lower end to slip over the cross bar 56 which supports the trumpets. A lug 60 (Fig. 13) is provided on the cross bar for each bracket 59 and enters a recess therein to correctly position the bracket and anvil in relation to the associated trumpet. Each bracket is thus readily removable from the cross bar, thus permitting the machine to be easily cleaned or inspected. Each anvil 58 is secured to its bracket 59 by a suitable binding screw 61.

A guide-plate 62 (Fig. 15) is provided for each trumpet 55, said guide-plate being recessed to provide guiding portions 63 engaging the opposite edges ofthe fiber strip S. Each guide-plate is pivoted to its corresponding bracket 59 and is secured in adjusted angular position by a clamping screw 64. Each bracket 59 is also provided with a slightly depressed upper edge portion 65 over which the strip S is drawn.

The guide-plates 62 are very important elements of our invention, as it is desirable that the reed when folded shall have the section shown in Fig. 24, with the edge of the outer folded layer exactly aligned with the edge of the reed. This alignment is, of course, controlled by the position of the longitudinal fold lines and the position of these fold lines ma be varied transversel accordin to the adjustment of the guide-plate 62. By slightly adjusting theguide-plate to one side or the other, the edge of the outer fold may be easily positioned to exactly coincide with the edge of the reed;

Pressing and sizing mechanism The pressing and sizing mechanism C is indicated generally in Figs. 9 to 11 and certain details thereof are best shown in Figs. 13 and 16.

This mechanism comprises a lower presser roll and an upper presser roll 71. The lower roll 70 is provided with a groove 7 2 for each folding trumpet 55 and the upper roll 71 is provided with corresponding ribs 73.

Each folded strip S is delivered direct from one of the trumpets 55 to one of the grooves 72, as clearly shown in Fig. 153, and is compressed firmly in the bottom of the groove by a corresponding rib 73 on the upper presser roll 71.

This operation breaks down the stiff heavy fiber at the fold lines. and also accurately sizes the fiber reed, the final width thereof being determined by the width of the groove 72, as the flattening of the reed causes it to expand laterally to the extreme limits of the groove 72 in which it is confined.

Guide members 74L 16) are mounted upon a cross bar 7 5, which cross bar is secured by bolts 7 6 (Fig. 9) to the bearing blocks 77 of the upper roll/71. These guide members 7 1 are of segmental shape and are provided with recesses 78 at their lower edges through which the folded strips S are guided to the grooves 72. The guide members 74 are also provided with segmental grooves 9 (Fig. 16) to clear the ribs 73 of the presser roll 71.

Springs 80 (Fig. 10) support the journal boxes 81 in the upper bearing blocks 77 and set screws 82 and lock nuts 83 are provided for forcing the boxes 81 positively downward to the desired spaced relation with the lower roll 70. The rolls are to be adjusted so that the space between the ribs 73 and the bottoms of the groove 72 is just sufficient to permit pasgage of the foldedand compressed fiber reec.

At stripper plate 85 (Figs. 9, 10, and 13) is detachably secured adjacent the presser rolls by bolts 66 (Fig. 9). The stripper plate 85 is also provided with fingers 87 (Fig. 13) which extend into the grooves 72 of the rolls 70 and c remove the reed therefrom as it leaves the bite of the rolls.

Unfoldingmechanism The unfolding mechanism D is clearly shown in Figs. 9, 19 and 20, and comprises a it is opened out to substantially its original flat conditlon by successive engagement with the edge 92 and the upper wall of the slot 93.

The strip S is delivered from the unfolding device in the condition shown in Fig.25, being substantially flat but being provided with well defined fold lines, along which the strip may be easily refolded.

Subsequent operations The subsequent operations of gumming,

partially drying, re-folding, re-pressing and winding form no part of the present application and for a complete description of these operations and the mechanism therefor, ref erence is made to Patent No. 1,680,358, previously identified.

Briefly described, the gumming mechanism, best shown in Figs. 9 and 10, comprises a drum 95 dippin into a bath of gum or glue L in a tank 9? and freely rotatable on bearings 96 (Fig. 9). folded fiber are drawn from the unfolding devices (Figs. 9 and 10) over the drum 95, during which operation the under surface of each strip is thoroughly coated with gum or glue. The strips then pass under guide rods 101 and over a fixed cross bar or scraper 102, by which surplus gum is removed from the strips. A U-shaped support 105 (Figs. 9 and 10) may be swung upward to hold the fiber strips clear of the drum when the machine is not in use or when it is desired to remove or clean the drum 95.

The re-folding and repressing mechanism G (Fig. 1) is spaced from the gumming mechanism E a substantial distance so as to The strips S of un- 1 provide a portion F of such length that the strips S will become partially dry while traversing the portion F, thus reaching the repressing and re-foldin mechanism G in a very sticky or tacky condition. In the actual machine the portion F occupies a space of some eight or ten feet in length.

The strips S are then drawn through the re-pressing and re folding mechanism G, fully described in our original application, by which mechanism the strip is again folded and firmly pressed into final shape and size. The finished fiber reed then passes to the winding mechanism H, where it is Wound upon a series of reels or spools 152.

Each reel is frictionally mounted on a winding shaft 142 (Fig. 2) which is continuously rotated at a speed in excess of the speed required to take up the finished reed when the'reel is of minimum diameter. tion drive permits each reel to slip relative to its driving shaft, thus placing tension upon the reed and winding it on the reel as fast as it is delivered by the mechanism G.

Suitable traverse mechanism is provided for raising and lowering the guides 157 of the winding mechanism to lay the reed properly on the reels.

Driving mechanism We will now briefly describe the driving mechanism by which the several parts of the machine are operated in correct time relation. A motor 180 (Fig. 2) is mounted in the lower part of the frame M and is provided with a driving pulley 181, connected by a belt 182 to a pulley 183 on amain drive shaft 145. The belt 182 is loose on the pulleys 181 and 183 but may be tightened by suitable shipper mechanism, as shown in Fig. 12. Shipper handles 190 (Fig. 2) are provided at the opposite ends of the machine and the machine may be started or stopped by the use of either one of these shipper handles.

The main shaft 145 is connected by bevel gears 197 (Fig. 11) to an upright shaft 198, which in turn is connected by bevel gears 199 (Fig. 11) to the shaft 200 upon which the lower presser roll is mounted. The upper roll 71 is driven from the lower roll through gears 201 and 202. The re-pressing mechanisln G is driven from the main shaft 145 through bevel gears 210 (Fig. 2) and an upright 211.

he speed ratios are so proportioned that the presser rolls 7 0 and 71 will deliver reed at a very slightly greater speed than the reed is taken up by the re-pressing rolls. This difference in speed is very slight but is sufiicient to prevent undue strain being placed upon the gummed fiber during the drying operation.

The upright shaft-s 142 of the winding mechanism are provided with bevel gears 143 (Fig. 2) meshing with gears 144 on the The fricmain drive shaft 145. The traverse mechanism is driven through a shaft 170 (Fig. 1) having a worm wheel 172 rotated by a worm (not shown) on a worm shaft 173 connected by bevel gears 174 to the main drive shaft 145.

It will thus appear that all parts of the mechanism are driven in suitable timed relation from the main drive shaft 145, the rotation of which may be controlled by either one of the shipper handles 190 and from either end of the machine.

Summary Having described the general operation of our improved machine for making fiber reed, and having described certain parts of the machine in full detail, it is believed that the construction and operation thereof will be readily understood. Our improved machine, due to its combination of a succession of cooperating mechanisms has been found very successful in commercial use in producing large quantities of fiber reed with very great rapidity.

Having thus described our invention and the advantages thereof, we do not wish to be limited to the details herein disclosed other wise than as set forth in the claims, but what we claim is 1. A machine for making fiber reed which consists in a folding device, and a combined pressing and sizing device effective to deliver folded fiber of uniform width.

2. A machine for making fiber reed having, in combination, a folding device, means to supply flat fiber thereto, and means to simultaneously press and size the folded fiber to uniform width, said latter means being operative on said fiber as it leaves the folding device.

3. In a machine for making fiber reed, a folding device effective to fold flat fiber to a three-ply strip, a device effective to break down and press said three-ply strip to a flat reed of uniform width, and an unfolding device operative on said reed after the folding and sizing thereof.

4. In a machine for making fiber reed, a folding device efiiective to fold fiat fiber to a three-ply strip, and a device effective to break down and press said three-ply strip to a fiat reed of uniform width.

5. A machine for making fiber reed having, in combination, a folding device, means to supply fiat fiber thereto, and means to simultaneously press and size the folded fiber, said pressing and sizing means being operative on said fiber as it leaves the folding device, and comprising rolls effective also to draw the fiber through the folding device.

6. In a machine for making fiber reed, a folding device, a grooved roll to receive the folded fiber therefrom, and a ribbed roll to press the folded fiber into said grooved roll and to thereby determine the width of said reed.

7. In a machine for making fiber reed, a plurality of folding trumpets, a roll having a plurality of grooves to receive the folded reed from said trumpets, and a cooperating roll having a plurality of ribs fitting said grooves and effective to press the reed firmly therein.

8. In a machine for making fiber reed, a folding device, a grooved roll to receive the folded fiber therefrom, a ribbed roll to press the folded fiber into said grooved roll and to thereby determine the Width of said reed, and fiber adjacent the bite of the rolls and between said folding device and said rolls.

9. In a machine for making fiber reed, a trumpet effective to make a three-ply fold in a strip of fiber, and means to guide the fiber to said trumpet, said guiding means being adjustable transversely to vary the transverse position of the fold lines in the Width of the fiber strip.

10. In a machine for making fiber reed, an unfolding device comprising a substantially U-shaped member supported by one leg there of and having a straight free fiber-engaging ed e.

I1. In a machine for making fiber reed, an unfolding device comprising a substantially U-shaped member supported by one leg thereof and having a straight free fiber-engaging edge and having also a guiding slot for the unfolded fiber.

12. In a machine for making fiber reed and an unfolding device comprising a substantially U-shaped member supported by one leg thereof and having a free fiber-engaging edge and having also an open-sided slot in the sup-- porting leg thereof for guidance of the unfolded fiber therethrough.

13. In a machine for making fiber reed, mechanism for folding and pressing the fiber, and means for supplying fiber to said mechaa guide member engaging said folded having a friction device freely engaging the sides of the roll, thereby to constantly control the rate of feed to said mechanism.

16. In a machine for making fiber reed, mechanism for folding and pressing the fiber and means for supplying fiber to said mechanism, said means comprising a support for a roll of fiber and a retarding device resting by gravity on said roll, said device being selfadjusting for decrease in roll diameter and having a friction guide pivoted on said retarding device and yieldingly engaging the sides of said roll, thereby to constantly control the rate of feed to said mechanism.

In testimony whereof We have hereunto affiXed our signatures.

EARL F. BALDWIN. FRANK E. WOODS.

nism, said means comprising a support for a roll of fiber, and a retarding device for said roll, mounted to engage the roll of fiber prior to the removal of the fiber therefrom, Whereby to control rate of feed to said mechanism.

14. In a machine for making fiber reed,

mechanism for folding and pressing the fiber,

and means for supplying fiber to said mechanism, said means comprising a sup-port for a roll of fiber and a retarding device resting by gravity on said roll and self-adjusting for decrease in roll diameter, thereby to constantly control the rate of feed to said mechanism.

15. In a machine for making fiber reed, mechanism for folding and pressing the fiber, and means for supplying fiber to said mechanism, said means comprising a support for a roll of fiber and a retarding device resting by gravity on said roll, said device being selfadjusting for decrease in roll diameter and

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4948638 *Aug 24, 1989Aug 14, 1990Tredegar Industries, Inc.Plastic film construction
US4950511 *Sep 2, 1988Aug 21, 1990Tredegar Industries, Inc.Plastic film construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/406, 493/439, 493/410, 493/337
International ClassificationB31F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB31F1/0019
European ClassificationB31F1/00A2B8