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Publication numberUS1762313 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 10, 1930
Filing dateJun 14, 1926
Priority dateJun 14, 1926
Publication numberUS 1762313 A, US 1762313A, US-A-1762313, US1762313 A, US1762313A
InventorsSnow Norman L, Thomas Willis P
Original AssigneeDiamond Power Speciality
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boiler cleaner
US 1762313 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 10, 1930. L SNOW ET AL BOILER CLEANER Filed June 14 1926 Patented June 10, 1930 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE NORMAN L. SNOW AND WILLIS P. THOMAS, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN, ASSIGNORS TO DIAMOND POWER SPECIALTY CORPORATION, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN, A CORPORA- TION OI MICHIGAN Application filed June 14,

The invention relates to boiler cleaners and refers more particularly to a blower element construction. One of the objects of the invention resides in an improved blower element anddischarge nozzle construction affording a simple and eflicient methodand means for mounting the nozzle in the blower element.

Referrin to the drawings in which like reference 0 aracters indicate corresponding parts;

Figure l is a view showing a portion of the blower element,

Figure 2 is a sectional view thereof along 2-2 of Figure 1,

Figure 3 is a fragmentary sectional view of the blower element illustrating one manner of uniting the nozzle with the blower element,

Figure 4 is a sectional view through a blower element illustrating the initial step of a modified manner of securing a nozzle to a blower element,

Figure 5 is a like View illustrating the next successive step in securing the nozzle to the blower element,

Figure 6 is a sectional view of a blower element of slightly different construction illustrating the application thereto of the nozzle securing means shown in Figures 4 and 5.

Figure 7 is a sectional view through a blow-- or element illustrating the initial step of another modified manner of securing a nozzle to a blower element,

Figure 8 is a like view illustrating the next successive" step in securing the nozzle to the blower element,

Figure 9 is a sectional view through a blower element illustrating the initial step of a still further modified manner of securing a nozzle to a blower element, and

Figure 10 is a like view showing the next successive step in securing the nozzle to the blower element.

In the drawings reference character 10 represents a portion of a blower element which may be formed from a strip of suitable material by overlapping the edges thereof as shown in Figures 2-5 incluslve. The overlapped portions may be secured together as shown in Figures 1 and 2 by mounting BOILER CLEANER 1920. Serial N'o. 115,971;

therein through suitable registering openings in the overlapping portlons one or more nozzles 11 which further function to-project jets of cleaning fluid adjacent parts of the boiler to be cleaned. The nozzles may be secured in place by any suitable means such as expanding, welding, etc. Thus the discharge nozzles serve as rivets to pin together the overlapping edges of the strip.

In Figure 3, the nozzle 11 may be welded to the overlapping edges of the blower element strip 10 as by the usual spot weld method. Electrode 12 may be shaped 'to approximate the expanding walls of the Venturi nozzle. When electric current is supplied by circuit 13 toelectrode 12, this circuit including the blower element, and the electrode 12 pressed down within the nozzle as shown in Figure 3, sufficient heat is readily produced thereby to weld the nozzle into the wall of the blower element.

With reference to the form of our invention illustrated in Figures 4 and 5 nozzle 11 may be inserted from the interior of the element 10 into suitable registering openings 15 in the overlapping portions of the element. This nozzle is provided with a shoulder 14 which abuts the inner periphery of the element opening 15 and limits the outward movement of the nozzle in this opening. The opening 15 is tapered while the upper outer walls 16 (in the position of the parts as shown in Figure 4) are straight or non-tapering aflordin clearance increasing progressively radial y outwardly. Likewise the interior walls 17 of the nozzle are non-tapering while the lower end portion 18 is fashioned to form the throat of the standard Venturi expanding nozzle.

Tool 20 fittedwith a tapering head 21 is blower element and is thus securely held in place. To prevent the nozzle being. driven through the opening 15 anvil 22 may be provided, located beneath the nozzle by a handle rod 23 which may extend longitudinally of the element to a point outside the element where it may be conveniently manipulated.

This same method of nozzle installation may be employed in a blowerelement constructed of seamless steel, or welded tubing. Thus as shown in Figure 6 nozzle 11 is provided with shoulder 14 and may be similarly mounted in element 10, the latter being closed ended at 24 in the customary manner.

In Figures 7 to 10 inclusive, we have illustrated modified methods and means of installing nozzles in blower elements consisting of inserting a nozzle into an opening in the element from the exterior thereof and then expanding the nozzle firmly into place.

Nozzle 11 as shown in Figure 7 is placed in the tapered opening 25 from the exterior of the element. On the nozzle interior, the upper portion is tapered at 26 while the lower portion (except for the lower throat portion 28) is or" straight or non-tapering wall construction asv at 27. This nozzle may be driven into place by a suitable tool as previously described in connection with Figures 4: and 5, the nozzle taking the form shown in Figure 8. Thus the expanding portion of the nozzle is shaped to the desired Venturi form. The expanding o eration causes displacement of the metal to ibrm expanded beads or portions 29 and 30 exteriorly and interiorly of the blower element respectively. Thus the nozzle is held firmly in place between these enlarged portions. The nozzle may be more readily. expanded if heated.

The nozzle assembl shown in Figures 9 and 10 is substantia y identical with that shown in Figures 7 and 8 with the exception that the opening 25 in the element 10 is non-tapering or straight-walled to receive the nozzle 11. The expanding action is substantially identical with that described in connection with Figures 7 and 8 except that the flow of metal of the nozzle 11 is somewhat more pronounced in forming the beads or portions 29' and 30'.

Nozzles of the various forms illustrated may be installed as described in either ordmary steel blower elements or in blower elements constructed of a material alloyed to provide characteristics aifording resistance to the destructive agencies set into action by the operation of the boiler.

What we claim as our invention is:

1. A boiler cleaner blower element comprising a tubular member having overlapping edges and a nozzle securing said edges in overlapping relation and providing discharge for a jet of cleaning fluid.

The method of fastening a Venturi nozzle and assembling the same with a tubular soot blower cleaner member consisting in forming an opening inthe wall of said mem ber, inserting the nozzle in said opening, and expanding the nozzle in said opening to firmly seat the nozzle therein and simultaneously fashioning an expanding Venturi jet discharge portion in said nozzle.

3. The method of fashioning a Venturi nozzle and assembling thesame with a tubular soot blower cleaner member consisting in forming an opening in said member, inserting a nozzle" formed with a Venturi throat portion in said opening, and expanding the nozzle in said opening to firmly seat the member therein and simultaneously fashioning a Venturi expanding portion communicating with said Venturi throat portion.

4. The method of fashioning a Venturi nozzle and assembling the same with a tubular soot blower cleaner member consisting in forming an opening in said member, the bounding walls of said opening being substantially frusto-conical, inserting a nozzle in said opening, and expanding the nozzle in said opening to fashion a Venturi jet expanding portion and simultaneously causing a portion of the nozzle to flow so as to form a shoulder engageable with the tubular member adjacent the opening therein.

5. The method of fashioning a Venturi nozzle and'assembling the same with a tubular soot blower cleaner member consisting in forming an opening in said member, the bounding walls of said opening being substantially cylindrical, inserting a nozzle in said opening, and expanding the nozzle in said opening to fashion a Venturi jet expanding portion and simultaneously causing a por tion of the nozzle to flow so as to form a shoulder engageable with the. tubular member adjacent the opening therein.

6. The method of mounting a nozzle in a tubular soot blower cleaner member consisting in forming an opening in said member, inserting a nozzle in said opening and exerting a pressure interiorly of the nozzle to expand the nozzle in said opening to cause a portion of the nozzle to flow so as to form a shoulder engageable with the tubular member adjacent the opening therein.

7. The method of mounting a nozzle in a tubular soot blower cleaner member consisting in forming an opening in said member, inserting in said 0 ening a bored nozzle pro-- vided with a shoulder adapted to contact with the interior surface of said tubular member adjacent the opening therein and exerting a pressure interiorly of said nozzle to expand the portion of said nozzle projecting beyond the exterior surface of said tubular member so as to cause a portion of the nozzle to flow to form a shoulder engageable with the said exterior surface of said tubular member.

8. The method of fashioning a nozzle and mounting the same in a blower element which consists in forming an opening in the element, inserting a nozzle in said opening, and expanding said nozzle in said opening, to firmly seat the same therein, while simultaneously fashioning a jetopening in said nozzle.

9. The method of shaping a nozzle and mounting the same in a blower element which In testimony whereof we aflix our signatures.

NORMAN L. SNOW. WILLIS P. THOMAS

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2563300 *Sep 8, 1948Aug 7, 1951Leonard AkerSprinkler
US2613992 *Nov 5, 1948Oct 14, 1952Bahnson Jr Agnew HSelf-cleaning spray nozzle
US2644720 *Dec 16, 1949Jul 7, 1953Carr Clifford HInsert nozzle
US2775810 *May 29, 1952Jan 1, 1957Babcock & Wilcox CoBoiler erection apparatus
US2820418 *Apr 2, 1954Jan 21, 1958Gen Motors CorpJet assembly for pumps
US2846249 *Oct 30, 1952Aug 5, 1958American Hospital Supply CorpJoint for tubular members
US2862447 *Sep 14, 1953Dec 2, 1958Albert Lyon GeorgeRocket structure
US2958127 *Oct 24, 1957Nov 1, 1960American Hospital Supply CorpMethod of joining tubular members
US3145136 *Oct 20, 1961Aug 18, 1964Lodding Engineering CorpMethod of creping paper using air jets
US3198441 *Mar 11, 1964Aug 3, 1965Baltimore Aircoil Co IncNozzle body and grommet assembly
US3240434 *Jan 13, 1964Mar 15, 1966Bradley Ralph FIrrigation nozzle
US3492824 *May 12, 1967Feb 3, 1970Dick Evans IncMethod of installing a pipe nipple in the wall of a casing
US3760479 *Mar 17, 1971Sep 25, 1973Burgess VibrocraftersMethod of fabricating a venturi in the passage of a tube
US3861194 *Apr 5, 1973Jan 21, 1975Burgess VibrocraftersSprayer nozzle construction
US4318214 *Nov 13, 1979Mar 9, 1982Colt Industries Operating CorpMethod and apparatus for manufacturing and forming engine induction passage venturi
US4545083 *May 9, 1984Oct 8, 1985Searson Thomas EBathing spray apparatus
US6764030Jan 2, 2002Jul 20, 2004Diamond Power International, Inc.Sootblower nozzle assembly with an improved downstream nozzle
US7028926Mar 24, 2004Apr 18, 2006Diamond Power International, Inc.Sootblower nozzle assembly with nozzles having different geometries
EP2657634A1 *Apr 23, 2013Oct 30, 2013Hydro-Thermal CorporationFluid diffusing nozzle design
WO1983001186A1 *Sep 23, 1982Apr 14, 1983Electrolux AbA spray nozzle
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/589, 219/94, 29/523, 29/890.143, 239/550, 29/890.14
International ClassificationF28G1/16, F28G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF28G1/166
European ClassificationF28G1/16D