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Publication numberUS1765652 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1930
Filing dateJun 6, 1928
Priority dateJun 6, 1928
Publication numberUS 1765652 A, US 1765652A, US-A-1765652, US1765652 A, US1765652A
InventorsBurgess Edward W
Original AssigneeSmith Corp A O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor or pavement and method of producing the same
US 1765652 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 24, 1930. E. w. BURGESS 1,765,652

FLOOR 0R PAVEMENT AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE' SAME Fil ed June 6; 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet l QZS/Q 0 r 8 I NTOR.

y 2/ I v 'fawnm W-Bureazss se BY ATTORNEY.

June '24, 1930. E. w. BURGESS 1,765,652

FLOOR 0R PAVEMENT AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME 2 greets-sheet 2 INVENTOR.

0 WARD 15K Bakazss A TTORNEYI 4 point out the novelty Patented June 24, 1930 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFicEI EDWARD BURGESS, OF MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN, ASSIG-NOB TO A. 0. SMITH CORPORATION, MILWAUKEE. WISCONSIN, A CORPORATION OF NEW.YORK

FLOOR OB PAVEMENT AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME Application filed June 6,

The invention resides in the provision of a metal grid of novel and improved construction adapted to be incorporated in a floor or a pavement to enhance he quality of the 5 wearing surface thereof.

. The general nature of my invention having thus been briefly stated, I shall now proceed to'fully describe the features and characteristics thereof, and shall later specifically of the invention in claims hereto appended. In the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification,

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a fragment of a I blank of sheet metal from which a grid having the features of the invention can be produced, there being holes through the said blank of sheet metal. The punching of the holes may desirably constitute the first o erao ation in the production of the metal gri Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view of a set of tools for forming cups upon the blank of sheet metal about the holes, disclosing a fragment of the blank as when acted upon by the tools. The cupping of the blank may desirably constitute the second operation in the production of the grid. i

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary plan view disclosing the blank after portions thereof have been cut away to leave connecting webs between the cups, and tongues about the bases of the cups and between the different connecting webs. The cutting away of portions of metal between the cups may desirably constitute the third operation in the production of the grid.

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fi 3, but disclosing the tongues about the bases of the cups and between the different connecting 4o webs as having been bent downwardly, in direction away from the connecting webs 01pposite that in which the cups'extend. T e

, bending of the tongues may desirably constitute the fourth operation in the production of the grid. 4

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary elevational view of a set of tools for so bending down the tongues, disclosing a fra mentof the blank as when acted upon by t ese tools.

to Fig. Bis a fragmentary sectional view of 1928. Serial N0. 283,156

a set of tools for sizing the on s to dispose their free edge faces in a singlzr lane, and for causing the said free edge aces to be thickened in case thicker edge faces are in a particular instance desirable. The sizing or leveling of the cups may desirably constitute th'edfinal operation in the production of the a Fig. 7 is a fragmentary plan view, on a somewhat larger scale, disclosing a plurality of the grids and an interlocking device applied to align the grids both vertically and horizontally.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view of. a grid as it would appear on either line 8-8 indFig. 7 the interlocking device being omitte Fig. 9 is a sectional view on line 9-9 in Fig. 7, detailing an interlocking device and its relation to the grids.

Fig. 10 is a perspective view, on a smaller scale, of a fragment of a floor or pavement having an incorporated grid (or grids) made in accordance with the principles of the invention, parts being sectioned and broken away to better disclose the structure.

Fig. 11 isa dotted line plan view diagrammatically disclosing the arrangement of the grids of Fig. 7.

Fig. 12' is a plan view of a modified form of grid having the features of the invention, disclosing, in dotted lines, several of the tongues before bent downwardly.

With more especial reference to Figs. 7 to 10, inclusive, of the drawings, I have there shown a metallic grid 20 which consists, generally, of a base-plate 21 having thereon upwardl'y extending, preferably perpendicular, filler receiving cups 22 and downwardly extending, preferably perpendicular, projections or lips 23. The body of the base-plate "desirably has openings 24 therethrough of such dimensions that the base-plate is consti-v tuted by webs 25 spacing apart annular members 26 about and integral with the bases of. the cups 22 to unite the whole in an integral structure. Actually, the webs 25 could connect directly withthe bases of the cups 22 so that the downwardly extendin pro ections or lips23 would be upon the asesof the cups, instead of'upon the annular members 26,.as will be apparent.

Thegridas briefly described could be a casting, but I desirably construct it from a blank of sheet metal, preferably sheet steel, in about the manner as now to be set forth.

In Fig. 1 there is disclosed a fragment of a blank of sheet metal 27 suitable for the manufacture of my grid. The punching of holes 28, at uniform and suitable distance apart, in the blank may constitute the first operation in. the production of the grid. As shown, the holes are inparallel rows, and the holes of adjacent rows are in staggered relation.

After the holes are punched, the cups 22, consisting of metal about the holes desirably set at right-angles to the plane of the blank of sheet metal, may be formed in any convenient manner. In Fig. 2 there is disclosed a set of tools for accomplishing the cupping of the blank, the said set of tools consisting of ordinary punches 29 adapted to cooperate with ordinary dies 30 suitable to my purpose. A fragment of the blank as when acted upon by the punches and dies is designated 31. The cups are so drawn that as much metal will be disposed therein as is consistent with the use for which the grid is designed.

The next operation in the production of the grid may consist in cutting away portions ofmetal between the cups, as indicated at 32 1n Fig. 3. As shown, the cut-away parts 32 are of general triangular or clover shape, to

" leave the annular members 26 about the bases of the cups, the webs 25 between the different annular members, and a plurality of inwardl v projecting extensions or tongues 33, three for each cut-away portion as shown, about the annular members and in the plane of the blank of sheet metal. Any ordinary or pre ferred type of tool can be utilized to remove the parts 32 from the blank of metal.

The next operation may consist in bend ing the extensions or tongues 33 downwardly to provide the projections or lips 23, deslrably set at right-angles to the plane of the blank of sheet metal, as disclosed in Figs. 4 and 5. In Fig. 5, a set of tools suitable for bending the extensions or tongues downwardly is designated 34, and a fragment of the blank of sheet metal after acted upon by these tools is represented 35 in Figs. 4 and 5. The projections or lips 23 are desirably of the same length to be disposed in a singleplane parallel with and beneath the plane of the webs 25 and annular members 26. Preferably, the lower edge faces of the said proections or lips 23 are flat, in order that the finished grid can rest squarely upon a surfaceto be paved, as will be understood.

The final operation n the production of the grid may consist in sizing the cups to dispose their upper or free edge faces in a single plane above the plane of the webs and plish the sizing.

.in Fig. 10. The grid adapted to engage the edge faces 39 of the cups to cooperate with the base 36 to accom- The blank is located for the sizing opera on by means of pins 40 upon the base and passing upwardly through the cups and into openings of the sizing die. Any other set of tools suitable for accomplishing the desired result can be substituted for the set of tools disclosed.

The sequence of the operations as above set forth could be varied, or several of the operations might be combined, within the spirit of the invention. 1

In Fig. 12 I have disclosed a metal grid 1n all respects similar to the grid as alreadydescribed, except that the arrangement of p.

are bounded by four cups and four webs instead of bythree cups and three webs as in the form of the invention disclosed in Figs. 1 to 10, and there are four downwardly extending projections or lips 23 for each cutaway portion. I

A fragment of a floor or pavement, having an incorporated grid (or grids) made in accordance with my invention, is disclosed can be incorporated in the floor or pavement after any preferred or well known fashion. I may place the grid upon a foundation to be paved, and pour any suitable filler thereon until the filler is about flush with the upper edge faces of the cups of the grid, or I may similarly cast the grid integral with a slab suitable for a floor or pavement.

In order that no sharp edges will be present at the surface of the filler, or.will protrude above the surface, I make certain that all of the' upper or free edge faces of the cups lie in a single horizontal plane which is parallel with the body of t e blank of sheet metal.

In Figs. 7 and 9 I have disclosed a plurality of grids each havin the features of as may be deemed desirable in a particular instance.

Each interlocking device 41 consists of a .strip or piece of metal, preferably flat sheet metal, including an sha ed end portions 42 connected by a bridge piece 43, and spaced apart downwardly pro ecting ears 44 upon the lower edge of eac of the are shaped portions and having oppositely extending flanges 45 which provide, together with the ears, oppositely disposed hooks. The are shaped portions 42 are adapted to partially envelope adjacent cups 22 of contiguous grids to be connected so that the bridge piece 43 lies between the cups in about the manner as best disclosed in Fig. 7, and the oppositely disposed hooks are adapted to fit about webs adjacent the corresponding cups in about the manner as best disclosed in Fig. 9. g

The dotted line interlocking device of Fig. 7 is disclosed situated ready to be moved into its interlocking relation with respect to the adjacent grids there shown. The lower edge of the said'device is in close proximity to the plane of the upper faces'of the webs, and the ears and oppositely extending flanges constituting the hooks of the dinerout are shaped portions are disposed between adjacent converging webs of different grids so that the said oppositely extending flanges are just beneath the plane of the lower faces of the said adjacent converging webs.

When then the said interlocking device is moved from its dotted line position in said Fig. 7 to its, full line positlon therein, the oppositely extending flanges of the hooks slide beneath the end portions of the said adjacent converging webs which are closer together, while the ears of said hooks span the distance between the said adjacent webs. Thus, the interlocking device causes the different grids to be fastened together in ver-' tical and horizontal alignment against the possibilit will be 0 vious.

Any other convenient type of interlocking device can be utilized. A device suitable for fastening together grids of the modified form of Fig. 12 where the webs bear either parallel or perpendicular relation to each other would, naturally, be of modified construction. Inthe instance of grids such as disclosed in said Fig. '12 it mig t be preferable to utilize an interlocking device of resilient nature and having hooks adapted to of accidental displacement, as-

what I claim and utilize' downwardly extending projections or lips 23, as, for example, when a relatively a thin slab of pavement or flooring is to be laid, but ordinarily it will be preferable to provide the said projections or lips to in crease the vertical depth of the grid, and-to provide for the maximum in bonding surace.

A steel grid constructed and imbedded, in the manner described, in any material suitable for floors or pavements, will form a permanently smooth wear-proof surface calculated to last indefinitely. For floors and pavements subjected to the action of the elements, copper-btaring corrosive-proof steel maybe desirable. The-size, thickness and spacing of the'cups will be varied to suit different conditions.

The grid of the invention when constructed of steel and imbedded in a concrete or like slab will increase the strength of the slab and permit casting a thinner slab than would otherwise be required for a given load condition.

I preferably utilize a circular or other generally curved cup because such a form is superior to a rectangular, triangular, or any angular grid, chiefly because no sharp corners are present wherethe filler can'probably break out quite easily. In case a part of the filler should break out, cups' of continuous metal will withstand bending better than other types of grids, as for example, those formed of multiple. bars which are interlocked, riveted, or welded together. The top edges of the cups will take all of the wear imparted to the floor or pavement, and being spaced apart and continuous, the cups willpresent no surfaces apt to cause slippage.

The provision of the webs spacing the cups apart, of the openings between the webs and cups, and of the downwardly projecting lips, as wellas the provision of cups having open bottoms, furnishes a grid of reticulated lized inconnection with floors and pavements of a great many different varieties not necesary to be here specifically mentioned. Having thus full described my invention, d esire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is:

. mately flush with the surface of the said down-struck from the plane of filler material above the elevation of said base-plate, and the bottoms of said cups being open.

2. A grid comprising a plurality of sheet metal filler receiving cups spaced apart by webs adapted to be imbedded in filler material, the said cups being up-struck from the plane of said webs and having their upper edge faces disposed substantially in a single plane, and projections down-struck from the plane of said webs.

3. A grid comprising a blank of sheet metal, a portion of which is formed into a plurality of filler receiving cups spaced apart by webs adapted to be imbeddgd in filler ma.- terial, the said cups being up-struck from the plane of said webs and having their upper edge faces disposed substantially in a single plane, projections down-struck from the plane of said webs, and openings through the body of the blank of sheet metal between the cups and webs.

4. A grid comprising a blank of sheet metal, a portion of which is formed. into a plurality of filler receiving cups s aced by webs adapted to be imbedded in Her material, the said cups being vertically upstruck from the plane of said webs and having their upper edge faces disposed substantially in a single plane adapted to lie approximately flush with the surface of the said filler material, projections vertically down-struck from the plane of said webs, and'openings through the body of the blank of sheet metal between the cups and webs.

5. A' grid comprising a blank of sheet metal, a portion of which is formed into a plurality of filler receiving cups, annularmembers about the bases of the cups and integral therewith, webs spacing said annular members apart and uniting the whole in an integral structure, the said webs and annular members being adapted to be imbedded in filler material, the said cups being up-struck from the plane of said annular members and having their upper edge faces disposed substantially in a single plane adapted to lie approximately flush with the a blank of sheet metal, which consists in surface of the said filler material above the elevation of said base-plate, projections sai webs, and openings through the body of the blank of sheet metal between the cups and webs.

6. The method of producing a grid from a blank ofsheet metal, which consists in striking uggpaced apart filler cups y of said blank and disposing in a single plane, and striking down projections from the body of said blank to situate said projections adjacent the face of the blank opposite said cups.

7 The method of producing a grid from a blank of sheet metal, which consists in striking up spaced apart filler receiving cups from 'the body of said blank and disposing the free edge faces of said cups substantially in said blank to situate said projections adjacent the face of the blank opposite said cups.

9. The method of producing a grid from a blank of sheet metal, which consists in striking up spaced apart filler receiving cups from the body of said blank and disposing the free edge faces of said cups in a lane substantially parallel with said blank ody,

cutting away portions of the body of said blank between said cups to provide webs ex tending between the cups, and striking down projections from the body of said blank to situate said projections adjacent the face of the blank opposite said cups.

10. The method of producing a grid from a blank of sheet metal, which consists in striking up spaced apart filler receiving cups from the body of said blank, positively operating upon the free edge faces of said cups to dispose said free edge faces in a single plane, and striking down projections from the body of said blank to situate said projections adjacent the face of the blank opposite said cups.

11. The method of producing a grid from a blank of sheet metal, which consists in striking up spaced apart filler receiving cups from the body of said-blank, positively operating upon the free edge faces of said cups to dispose them in a single plane, cutting away portions of the body of said blank between said cups, and striking down projections from the bed of said blank to situate said projections a jacent the face of the blank opposite said cups.

12. The method of producing a grid from striking up spaced'apart filler receiving cups from the ody of said blank and disposing said cups perpendicularly of said blank body with their 'free edge faces substantially in a single plane, cutting away portions of the bod of said blank between said cups, and down projections from the body of said blank to situate said projections adjacent the face of the blank opposite said cups.

13. A gridcomprising sheet metal filler extending upwardly from said and receiving cu to be 'mbed ed in filler material, said on 5 being struck from the plane of said webs and having their upper edge faces disposed substantially in a single plane, and projections struck from the plane of said webs.

14. A non-skid pavement comprising a body portion having imbedded therein a plurality of cup shaped metal elements, the

upper edges of which'lie flush with the up- 4 per surface of said body portion, said cup shaped elements having webs at the base thereof to .provide'uniform spacing of the same andhaving projections struck from the base thereof.

15. A tread comprising a body portion having a plurality of interlocking grid-like material of the pavement.

spaced by webs and adapted means for anchoring said base in the filler In testimony whereof, I have signed my name at Milwaukee, 1928. 7

sections firmly imbedded therein, each of said grid sections comprising a plurality of filler receiving cups spaced apart by webs, the

said cups being 'upstruck from the plane of the said webs and having their upper faces dis osed substantially in a single plane flush wit the surface of the tread, and projections struck from the plane of said webs.

16. A grid of the character described comprising a base plate adapted to be imbedded in a filler material, space extending u wardly therefrom the upper edge faces 0 said culps being disposed substantily in a single p igracximately flush with the surface of said er material, said base plate having openings therethrough between said filler receiving cups.

17. A grid of the character described comprising. a base plate adapted to be imbedded m a filler material, cups extending u war y therefrom, the upper edge faces 0 said cups being disposed I substantially in a single plane adapted to lie approximately flush with the surface. of the sand filler material, said base plate having openings therethrough between said filler receiving cups, and downwardly extendin projections disposed below the level of sai base late.

18. A reengorcing and, wear-resisting grid for pavements an the like, comprising a sheet metal body and integral projections extending upwardly and downwardly from said body said body having openings therethrough for receiving filler material.

19. A reenforcin and wear-resisting grid for pavements am? the like, comprising a sheet metal base, and projections struck upwardly from said base and providing openin therethrough for said filler material, sald sheet metal base having openings therein between said projections. I a

20. A reenforcin and wear-resisting grid for pavements an the like, comprising a sheet metal base having 0 filler receiving cups I ane adapted to lie ap- 'aced filler receiving nings therein for. 06 receiving filler material, integral projections this 4th day of June,

EDWARD W. BURGESS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2839671 *Jan 13, 1956Jun 17, 1958Harry H ShearinLight-diffusing unit
US4111585 *Apr 27, 1977Sep 5, 1978Mascaro Thomas CModule and modular support for turfgrass and like areas
US4621942 *Sep 27, 1984Nov 11, 1986Bartron CorporationGrass paving structure
US4917532 *Nov 15, 1988Apr 17, 1990Dr. Spiess Kunstoff-Recycling Gmbh Co.Grid plate
US7201538 *Aug 31, 2005Apr 10, 2007Airfield Systems, L.L.C.Subsurface drainage system and drain structure therefor
US7290958 *Aug 31, 2005Nov 6, 2007Airfield Systems, LlcSubsurface drainage system and drain structure therefor
US7503726 *Nov 6, 2007Mar 17, 2009Airfield Systems, LlcSubsurface drainage system and drain structure therefor
US7563052 *Apr 29, 2004Jul 21, 2009Tapijtfabriek H. Desseaux N.V.Sports floor and method for constructing such a sports floor
US7866918 *Sep 6, 2006Jan 11, 2011Werner OttoSoil stabilization and irrigation arrangement
US7938597 *May 10, 2011Airfield Systems, L.L.C.Subsurface drainage system and drain structure therefor
US7958681Jun 14, 2011Moller Jr Jorgen JModular floor tile with nonslip insert system
US8099915Jan 24, 2012Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US8341896 *Jan 23, 2012Jan 1, 2013Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US8398332 *Apr 23, 2010Mar 19, 2013Fiberweb, Inc.Ground-reinforcing grid
US8656662 *Nov 12, 2010Feb 25, 2014Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US8713863Mar 4, 2013May 6, 2014Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US9080333May 5, 2014Jul 14, 2015Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US20060120803 *Aug 31, 2005Jun 8, 2006Airfield Systems, L.L.C.Subsurface drainage system and drain structure therefor
US20060120804 *Aug 31, 2005Jun 8, 2006Airfield Systems, L.L.C.Subsurface drainage system and drain structure therefor
US20060272252 *Nov 30, 2005Dec 7, 2006Moller Jorgen J JrModular floor tile with nonslip insert system
US20080015038 *Apr 29, 2004Jan 17, 2008Tapijtfabriek H Desseaux N.V.Sports Floor and Method for Constructing Such a Sports Floor
US20080056824 *Nov 6, 2007Mar 6, 2008Airfield Systems, L.L.C.Subsurface drainage system and drain structure therefor
US20090031658 *Oct 15, 2008Feb 5, 2009Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US20090169303 *Mar 11, 2009Jul 2, 2009Blackwood Charles RSubsurface drainage system and drain structure therefor
US20100040420 *Sep 6, 2006Feb 18, 2010Werner OttoSoil stabilization and irrigation arrangement
US20110056158 *Nov 12, 2010Mar 10, 2011Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US20120057932 *Apr 23, 2010Mar 8, 2012Allen Philip MarshallA ground-reinforcing grid
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/21, 52/181
International ClassificationE01C11/00, E01C11/16
Cooperative ClassificationE01C11/16
European ClassificationE01C11/16