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Publication numberUS1767762 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1930
Filing dateJul 17, 1928
Priority dateJul 17, 1928
Publication numberUS 1767762 A, US 1767762A, US-A-1767762, US1767762 A, US1767762A
InventorsRobert G Jennings
Original AssigneeR G Jennings Yarn Cleaning Mac
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitting-machine spot-dyeing apparatus
US 1767762 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 24, 1930. R. G. JENNINGS 1,767,762 KNITTING MACHINE SPOT DYEING APPARATUS Filed July 17, 1928 3 sheets sheet 1 June 24, 1930. R. a. JENNINC$ KNITTING MACHINE SPOT DYEIEG APPARATUS I Filed July 17, 1928 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 a a M 6 a W a ,2 w v 2i C V 7 w ,3 M PM 2 June 24, 1936; R. 6. JENNINGS EESRFfiZ KNITTING MACHINE SPOT DYEING APPARATUS Filed July 17, 1928 sneets shaet 3 z'rlli/a ll Patented June 24, 193

TATS

ROBERT G. JENEINGS, OF ELMIBA, NEW? YORK, ASSIGNOR TO THE R. G. JENNINGS YARN CLEANING IiIACI-LINE 00. ENG, F ELIJIIEA, NEW YORK, A CORPORATION OF N EW YORK KNITTING-MACHINE SPOT-DYEING APPARATUS Application filed July 17, 1928.

My invention relates to a spot-dyeing appliance for use with knitting machines and is here illustrated in connection with a body machine of the circular type, though its use is not confined to that particular type of machine.

It is an object of my invention to provide a spot-dyeing meanswhich shall operate in such a manner as not to injure the needles, as has heretofore been done by applying a dye to the yarn before it passes down to the needles. This causes rusting of the needles and if the yarn is fine it results in tender yarns and holes in the fabric. By applying the dye to the fabric after knitting the dampness makes no difference. Alcohol is commonly used as a solvent for the dye in spot-dyeing of the unknitted yarn, because of its penetrating and its quick-drying properties, but water can be used as a solvent with the device of my invention, 111 place of a portion of the alcohol, or may replace it altogether in use if the cloth is exposed to drying conditions for some time after spot-dyeing, as is usually the case.

Another object of my invention is to save in the use of dye and particularly in the use vof alcohol which ordinarily forms an ingredient thereof, this economy being due to the fact that the dye is applied to the outside of the cloth so that the full effect of the dye is apparent, whereas when dye is applied to the yarn that part of the yarn showing at the inside of the cloth is dyed but without any benefit as there is no reason why the spots should appear at the inside of the garment. On the other hand it is advantageous to have the inner side of the cloth white as the dye sometimes comes off on the skin of the wearer, as many persons prefer garments undyed on the inner side.

Another object of the invention is to apply the dye in such a manner that it will not be thrown off, as occurs when the dye is applied to the yarn which is whirling around with great speed and consequently with a development of high centrifugal force. By applying the dye to the slowly moving cloth this action is avoided.

Serial No. 293,474.

Still another object is to save the cost of re-winding, as heretofore practice in spotdyeing yarn, and also the cost of fioor space for winders, upkeep of winders, etc.

Referring to the drawings, which are made a part of this application, and in which similar reference characters indicate similar parts Fig. 1 is an elevation of my machine viewed from the front;

Fig. 2 is a detail vertical section on a larger scale, the section being taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 3 is a plan of parts shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a transverse section of the machine on line l i of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a detail plan of a spot-dyeing appllance;

Fig. 6 is a side elevation corresponding to Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is an elevation of parts shown in 5, viewed from the left; and

*ig. 8 is a sectional view on line 8-8 of In the drawings, reference character 10 indicates the head of a rib knitting machine of the type known as a body machine, said machine having a series of cylinder needles 11 and a series of dial needles 12. The machine generally is of known type, having a take-up 13 for the fabric which passes around a pair of stretching rings 14:, 14 on its way to the take-up. A shaft 15 drives the cam-ring 14: in conventional manner, the shaft carrying a fast pulley 16 and a loose pulley 17 driven by a belt controlled by a belt-shifter 18 with a handle 19, whereby it may be moved manually. A belt 20 drives the take-up by means of pulleys 21 and 22.

An annulus 23 is held in place about the stretching rings 14-, 14 by means of legs 24: mounted on base-plate 25 and a cylindrical guide 26 extends upward from annulus 23. The guide 26 and a roller bearing 27 on annulus 28 provide means for supporting and guiding a rotary support 28 for the spotdyeing devices with which my invention is particularly concerned. The support 28 retates with the cam-ring and dial cam cap,

though not necessarily at the same speed or in the same direction, but I do not limit myself to such a construction as relative movement only is necessary and the principle may be embodied even in a straight machine.

The support 28'is driven by a belt 29 passing over a pulley 30 on a shaft 31 driven by a pinion 32 meshing with the usual crowngear (not shown) secured to the cam-ring and driven by gearing connecting it to shaft 15. The belt passes from pulley 30 to a guide pulley 32, then about support 28, then about another guide pulley (not shown) and then back to pulley 30.

On the support there are a suitable num 'ber of color-applying devices, here shown as constructed for the application of dye in liquid form to the fabric, and each consisting of a bracket 33 pivoted at 34 on the upwardly-extending flange of support 28. Springs '34 tend to move the brackets on their pivots so as to hold the rotary members or friction gears 35 in contact with the fabric and also to hold nozzles 36 close to or in contact with the fabric. To facilitate the rotation of the friction gears 35 the circumference thereof is knurled or roughened as shown clearly in Fig. 6. The nozzlesare attached, preferably by screw-threads, to blocks 37 (Figs. 5 to 7) having a longitudinal passage leading to the port of the nozzle, from a short tube 38 also connected to the block preferably by screw-threads. A pipe 39 connects the short tube 38 to a supply tank 40 which may supply dye to several or all the nozzles. As here shown two tanks supply the various nozzles.

A valve 41' (Fig. 7) is held in place in block 37 by a screw 42, this valve having a passage adapted to register with the passage of block 37. An arm 43 1s secured to the top of the valve by a screw 44 or in any other convenient manner. on the valve is moved by a spring 46 1n a Another arm 45 direction for normally closing the'valve, the movement of arm 45 being limited by a pin 46.

The gear 35 has two pins 48 pro ecting upward into the plane of movement of arm 43 (Fig. 6) and it will be evident that the pins will strike the arm 43 as the gear is rotated in the operation of the machine, to thereby open the valve 41 and permit the dye to be ejected against the cloth by reason of the pressure of the fluid in tank 40. This pressure may be augmented in various ways, if desired, as by forcing air under pressure into the tank. Preferably threaded holes are formed. in the gear, whereby the number and location of the pins 48 may be varied according to the pattern desired.

It will be apparent also that the design or pattern desired to be produced on the finiished fabric may be varied also by locating the spot dyeing appliance at different distances apart on the supporting rings.

It is desirable that the application of color should cease on stoppage of the machine andfor this end I have provided means to remove the nozzles 36 from-tl1e fabric when a Sleeves 51 are mounted on posts on sup-' port 28 so as to contact with the inner face of ring 49, thus providing anti-friction guiding means for the ring, and overhanging flanges 52 (Fig. 2) are provided on said sleeves for holding down the ring 49. Bent fingers 53 on the ring engage over radial pins 54 mounted on valves 55 pivoted on blocks 37, each valve having a passage normally registering with the passage in a block 37. The valves are held in place byscrews 56 (Figs. 3 and A brake 57 (Figs. 1 and 4) is slidably supported on a bracket 58 and is forced toward ring 49 by a spring 59. A lever 60 is connected at its lower end to brake 57 and its upper end is located in the path of a rod 61 connected to the shipper 1.9 for movement therewith in a direction to remove the brake from the ring 49 when the belt is shifted from the loose to the fast pulley in starting the machine.

Operation: In the operation of my device it will be seen that the gears 35 rotate as the machine is driven, the circumference of the friction gears being in contact with the rotating fabric, as shown, with the result that whenever a pin 48 strikes a finger 43 the corresponding valve 41 will be opened and, as this opens the passage from-the tank 40 to the nozzle 36 it follows that coloring matter will be ejected from the nozzles due to the hydrostatic pressure in the tank or to other pressure, as above explained.

The valve is open only during the time it takes for the pin 48 to pass and release the finger 43 when the spring 46 closes the valve again and the dye will therefore be applied in a machine of the character illustratedseveral times by each device during a rotation of the machine, the sequence being adapted to be varied as above described or in other Ways.

lVhen the machine is stopped, as by a stop- 1,7e7,7ea 3 As a result ofthis the bent fingers 53 will stop and by their engagement will cause movement of pins 54:, thereby rotating valves 55 into closed position and cutting off the flow of the dye. At the same time the flat faces at 62 on the valves 55 will engage with the outer Wall of the upper flange of support 28 and will move the bracket 83, on which the gear 35 is supported, about its pivot 34 against the tension of spring 34 to carry the nozzle 36 away from the fabric.

In this way the flow of dye is cut off and application of such dye as remains in the nozzle and the passage in the block is also prevented. When the belt is shifted back to the fast pulley the brake will be removed and the spring or springs 50 will carry the ring 28 back to its normal position thereby re-opening the valves 55.

It Will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various modifications may be made in my device without departing from the spirit of the invention, and therefore I do not limit myself to what is shown in the drawings and described in the specification, but only as indicated in the appended claims.

What I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is

1. In a knitting machine, stopping means, a support having movement relatively to the cloth in a direction transverse to the wales thereof, a color-applying device mounted on said support, means for causing said device to apply coloring matter to the cloth being knitted after passing the knitting point during the operation of said knitting machine, and means actuated by the stopping means for removing said device from the fabric when the machine stops.

2. In a knitting machine, stopping means, a support having movement relatively to the cloth in a direction transverse to the wales thereof, means mounted on said support for applying a liquid to said cloth, means for operating said liquid applying means while the knitting machine is running, and means actuated by the stopping means for preventing further application of color by said color applying means when the machine stops.

3. In a knitting machine, stopping means, a support having movement relatively to the cloth in a direction transverse to the wales thereof, means mounted on said support for applying a liquid to said cloth, means for operating said liquid applying means at intervals during the knitting of ,a course of stitches, and means actuated by the stopping means for preventing further application of color by said color applying means when the machine stops.

4. In a circular knitting machine, means for knitting a fabric, a support on said machine spaced from the knitting means and rotatable relatively to the fabric, stopping ing movement relatively to the cloth in a direction transverse to the wales thereof, a

nozzle having an opening adjacent the fabric, means for supplying liquid coloring matter to said nozzle, and means for intermittently shutting off the supply of coloring matter.

' 6. In a circular knitting machine, means for knitting a fabric, a support on said machine spaced from the knitting means and rotatable relatively to the fabric, a series of color-applying devices arranged in spaced relation on said support, each of said devices including a nozzle adjacent the fabric, and means for ejecting coloring material through said nozzles at intervals during the knitting of a course.

7. In a circular knitting machine, means for knitting a fabric, a support on said machine spaced from the knitting means and rotatable relatively to the fabric, a series of color-applying devices arranged in spaced relation on said support, each of said devices including a nozzle adjacent the fabric, means for ejecting coloring material through said nozzles at intervals during the knitting of a course, and means for preventing further flow from said nozzles afterstoppage of the machine.

8. In a circular knitting machine, means relation on said support, each of'said devices" including a nozzle adjacent the fabric, means for ejecting coloring material through said nozzles at intervals during the knitting of a course, and means for moving the nozzles away from the fabric on stoppage of the machine.

9. In a circular knitting machine, means for knitting a fabric, a support on said machine spaced from the knitting means and rotatable relatively to the fabric, a series of color-applying devices arranged in spaced relation on said support, each of said devices including a nozzle adjacent the fabric, means for ejecting coloring material through said nozzles at intervals during the knitting of a course, means for moving the nozzles away from the fabric on stoppage of the machine, and means for automatically returning the nozzles to position on re-starting the machine.

10. In a. circular knitting machine, means for knitting a fabric, a support on said machine spaced from the knitting means androtatable relatively to. the fabric, a series ofcolor-applying devices arranged in spaced relation on said support, each of said de vices including, a nozzle adjacent the fabric, a passage leading to the nozzle,v means for supplying liquid coloring. matter under pressure to said nozzle through said passage, arvalve in-the passage, and meansfor intermittently opening said valve.

11. In a circular knitting machine, means for knitting a fabric, a support on said machine spaced from, the knitting means and 12. In a circular knitting machine, means.

for knitting a fabric, a support on said'machine spaced from the knitting means and rotatable relatively to the fabric, a series of color-applying devices arranged in spaced relationon said support, each of said devices including a nozzle adjacent the fabric, a passage leading to the nozzle, means for supplying liquid coloringmatter,under pressure to said nozzle through said p a ssage,a valve in the passage, means for intermittently opening said valve, a second valve in each passage, said last-named valve being normallyopen, means for closing each of said last-named valves on stoppage, and means for automatically re-opening said valves on re-starting the machine.

13. In a circular knitting machine,,means' for knitting a fabric, a support, on said machine spaced from the knitting means and rotatable relatively to the fabric, a series of color-applying devices arranged in spaced relation on said support, each of said devices including a nozzle adjacent the fabric, a passage leading to the nozzle, means for supplying liquid coloring matter under pressure to said nozzle through said passage, a valve in the passage, a gear operated by the rotation of the machine, and means operated by said gear for opening the valve intermittently.

14. I a circular knitting machine, means for knitting a fabric, a support on sald machine spaced from the kn tting means and rotatable relatively to the fabric, a series of color-applying devices arranged in spaced relation on said support, each of said devices including a nozzle adjacent the fabric, a passage leading to the nozzle, means for supplying liquid coloring matter under pressure to said nozzle through said passage, a valve in the passage, a gear operated by the rotation of the machine, a finger on the valve, a pin on the gear adapted to engage said finger to open the valve, and meansto close the valve on release of said finger by said pin.

15. In a circular knitting machine, means for knitting a fabric, a support on said machine spaced from the knitting means and rotatable relatively to the fabric, a series of color-applying devices arranged in spaced relation on said support, each of said devices including a nozzle adjacent the fabric, means for ejecting coloring material through said nozzles at intervals during the knitting of a course, means for preventing further flow from said nozzles after stoppage of the machine including an element extending circumferentially of the machine, means normally holding it in one position, means to change its position on stoppage of themachine, and connections from said element to render said color-applying devices inoperative on such change of position.

16. In a circular knitting machine, means for knitting a fabric, a support on said machine spaced from the knitting means and rotatable relatively. to the fabric, a series of color-applying devices arranged inspaced relation on said support, each of said dc vices including a nozzle adjacent the fabric, means for ejecting coloring materialithrough said nozzles at intervals during the knitting of a course, an element. extending circumferentially of the machine,.connections from said element to: said color-applyingdevices, and means to operate said element onstoppage of the machine for moving'the nozzles away from the fabric.

17 In a circular knitting machine, means for knitting a fabric, a support on said ma-. chine spaced from the knitting'means and rotatable relatively to the fabric, a series. of color-applying devices arranged in spaced relation on said support, each of said'devicesincluding'a nozzle ad acent the fabric,

for ejecting coloring material through said nozzles at intervals during the knitting of a course, an element extending circumferentially of the machine, connections from said element to said means to operate said element on stoppage of the machine for moving the nozzles away from the cloth, and means for automatically returning said element onire-starting'tlfie ma chine thereby returning said devices to, operative position adjacent the fabric.

18. In a circular knitting machine, a stationary needle bed, a rotary needle cam carrier, a series of devices for applying color to the fabric rotating with said carrier, a ring rotating With said carrier, a brake auto,-

maticallyapplied to said ring on stoppage of the machine, and connections from said color-applying devices,.

ring for inhibiting further operation of the color-applying devices when the brake is applied to the ring.

19. In a circular knitting machine, a stationary needle bed, a rotary needle cam carrier, a series of devices for applying color to the fabric rotating with said carrier, each having a nozzle close to the cloth, a ring rotating with said carrier, a brake automatically applied to said ring on stoppage of the machine, and connections from the ring for moving said nozzles away from the fabric on stoppage of the machine. 7

20. In a circular knitting machine, a stationary needle bed, a rotary needle cam carrier, a series of devices for applying color to the fabric rotating with said carrier, a ring rotating with said carrier, a brake automatically applied to said ring on stoppage of the machine, connections from said ring for inhibiting further operation of the colorapplying devices when the brake is applied to the ring, and means for automatically restoring said devices to operation on again starting the machine.

21. In a circular knitting machine, a stationary needle bed, a rotary needle cam carrier, a series of devices for applying color to the fabric rotating with said carrier, a ring rotating with said carrier, a brake automatically applied to said ring on stoppage of the machine, connections from said ring for inhibiting further operation of the colorapplying devices when the brake is applied to the ring, and means serving to return said ring to normal position on re-starting the machine.

22. A color-applying device for knitting machines comprising a nozzle, having an opening adjacent the fabric, a passage leading to said nozzle, a valve in the passage, a gear, and connections from said gear to said valve for operating the same.

23. A color-applying device for knitting machines comprising a nozzle, having an opening adjacent the fabric, a passage leading to said nozzle, a valve in the passage, a gear, connections from said gear to said valve for opening the passage, and means for closing the valve automatically after being operated by said gear.

24. In a knitting machine stopping means, a color-applying device mounted thereon, and means for causing said device to apply coloring matter to the knitted cloth after the knitting point during the operation of the knitting machine, and means actuated by the stopping means for removing the color applying portion of said device from the fabric when the machine stops.

25. In a knitting machine stopping means, a color-applying device mounted thereon, and means for causing said device to apply coloring matter to the knitted cloth after the knitting point during the operation of the knitting machine, and means actuated by the stopping means for preventing further application of coloring matter by said color-applying device when the operation of the knitting machine ceases.

26. A color applying device for knitting machines comprising a nozzle having an opening adjacent the fabric, a passage leading to said nozzle, a valve in the passage, a gear, and means on said gear for periodically operating said valve.

27. A color applying device for knitting machines, comprising a nozzle having an opening adjacent the fabric, a passage leading to said nozzle, a valve in the passage, a gear, and removable means on said gear for actuating the valve, said gear being provided with means for receiving said removable means in different positions on the gear whereby the design or pattern being applied to the fabric may be varied.

In testimony whereof I hereunto affix my signature.

ROBERT G. JENNINGS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2508348 *Apr 11, 1949May 23, 1950Munsingwear IncCourse marker for tricot and the like flat-bed knitting machines
US2531649 *Jul 23, 1946Nov 28, 1950Saftlas SamuelKnitting machine
US3461689 *Jun 19, 1967Aug 19, 1969Wolfgang HerkenbergPile treating attachment for pile fabricating machines
US3523429 *Mar 28, 1969Aug 11, 1970Wolfgang HerkenbergMethod of pile treatment in pile fabric manufacture
US3849847 *Nov 28, 1972Nov 26, 1974C CorbiereProcess for storing textile filaments in knitted form
US4305184 *Jun 29, 1979Dec 15, 1981Bunker Ramo CorporationControl of skew, bow and yield in circularly knit pile fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/147
International ClassificationD04B35/22
Cooperative ClassificationD04B35/22
European ClassificationD04B35/22