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Publication numberUS1768242 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1930
Filing dateNov 9, 1927
Priority dateNov 9, 1927
Publication numberUS 1768242 A, US 1768242A, US-A-1768242, US1768242 A, US1768242A
InventorsFerguson Gale L
Original AssigneeAuto Prime Pump Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pumping apparatus
US 1768242 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 24, 1930. G. l.. FERGUSON PUIPING APPAEATUS med Nov. s, 1927 v INVENToR. Ga/e .fa/19216022 ATTORNEYS Patented June 24, 1939 uN-rrlsn .l STATES PATENT: oFF1cs,

GALE'L. FERGUSON, 0F LEVELAND, OHIO, ASSGNOR, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, T0

, AUTO PRIME PUNT COMPANY, F CLEVELAND, OHIO, A CORPQRATI0N-`OF1IOHI0 PUMPING APPARATUS Application med Nvembcr, 1927. Serial No. 232,087.

The' present invention relates, as indicated,

l to a pumping apparatus, and more particularly to the rings adaptedfor insertion in 1the ycasings of centrifugal pumps. The primary ob'ects of the invention are to provide .againstv eakage from the liquid channel of such pumps, to provide the most eiiicient type of liquid channel, and to provide means for Avarying the capacity of a pump of given size. To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, said invention, then, v

consists of the means hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims. l The annexed drawingand the following description set forth in detail certain mechanism embodying the invention, such dis closed means constituting, however, but one `of various mechanical forms in which the principle .of the invention may be used. In said annexed drawings:

Fig. 1 is a cross-section of a pump of the type indicated disclosing a pump rlng provided with sealing means; Fig. 2 is an eleva-` tion of a slightly modied ring; Fig. 3 is a transverse fragmental section of a pairl of mating pump rings andan impeller; Fig. 4 is an elevation of a ring of small capacity; and Fig. 5 is an elevation of a ring of large capacity.

Referring more particularly to Fig. 1, the reference numeral 1 indicates a pump casing having an inlet connection 2 and an outlet connection 3. Said casing provides a cylindrical chamber 4 housing a pair of pump rings, only one of which is shown at 5.

Each of these rings comprises an outer rim 6 provided with an inlet port 6 and an outlet port 6" communicating with a liquid channel 7, and said channel is separated by a land 8 from the bearing aperture 9 in which is mounted the hub of an impeller 10. Said impeller comprises a disc-like element buckets 10 and 10, alternate ones of said buckets opening through opposite sides of A said impeller. It will be vnoted that each ofv formed, on its periphery, with a plurality of of the rotating impeller upon the liquid in the channel 15. l

The above elements are disclosed in my copendingapplication, Serial No. 225,888,

led October 13, 1927. .Experiments have shown that, in the operation of such pumps, a certain amount of leakage occurs between the land 8 and the adjacent face of the impeller 10. It is'obvious that leakage occuring h e're causes a tendency toward.V equalization of pressures in the liquid channel 7, thereby lowering the eiiiciency of the apparatus.

The grooves 11 inl said land are provided to.

prevent such leakage. The grooves 11 are,

as is clearly indicated in Fig. 1, inclined outwardly in the direction of rotation of the impeller, and their inner ends v12 are closed, while their outer ends 13,0pen into the channel 7 It will further be obvious that the grooves are so positioned that a radius drawn from the center of the ring and cutting the closed end of one Agroove will also cut 'the open end of an adjacent groove. Any li uid which seeps between the land 8 and the a jacent face of the impeller 10 will eventually find its way into one of the grooves 11. The liquid in the channel 7 rushing past the o en end of said groove will have an ejector e ect tending to draw the liquid in saidl groovev out into the channel. Furthermore, because of the inclination of said grooves, the wiping effect of the impeller will tend to force the 'liqluid out. of the grooves and into the chan- 7. Moreover, the liquid in the grooves acts as a liquid seal to prevent any flow into the bearin aperture v9.

Fig. 2 il ustrates a modification'in which v the inner ends of the grooves 11 are joined by a part-annular groove 14. Said groove 14 provides merely an added safeguard against leakage into the bearingaperture 9.

In Fi 3 I have shown'the cross-sectional shape o the liquid channel formed by mating rings 5 and 5'.- This channel, as will be obvious, is formed by the grooves 7 and 7 in the mating rings, and it will be noted that the outer portion A15 of the channel is narrower than the inner portion 15. The channel is so formed to revent the'occurrence of eddy currentsA in t e channel which mightl be setup by the slight differences in the velocity of various portions of the liquid stream. It Will be quite obvious that that portion 'of the liquid stream Which is farthest removed from the center of rotation of the impeller 10 will have a higher velocity than that portion which is nearer said center of rotation, and consequently that a channel of smaller cross-section will suiiice for the passage o an equal volume of liquid. The shape of the channel 'is exaggerated in Fig. 3, but the important fact is that the channel is so designed that substantially equal volumes of liquid will iiow'through each horizontal section of said channel as viewed in Fig. 3.

v Figs. 4 and 5 illustrate pump rings of separate sets which may be used With a single casing. Quite often it is desirable to vary the capacity of a pump; that is, a pump may be used in such a relation that, at certain times, it is necessary to pump a large volume of liquid for a relatively long time, and at other times it is necessary to pump only a relatively small volume of liquid for a considerable period. In such a case, it is necessary, of course, to install a pump which can f handle the large volume when necessary, but

it is wasteful of energy to usethe large capacity pump to supply a relatively small volume of liquid. One of the objects of the vpresent invention is to provide means for. obviating this extravagance.

A single pump installation Willinclude a single casing, a single impeller, and a plurality of pairs of pump rings of uniform external and internal diameters fory selective insertion in said casing. Fig. et illustrates one ring 5a of 'such a pair having a land 8a of relatively great width, and consequently having a channel 7 a of relatively small capacity. Fig. 5 illustrates a similar ring 5b of another pair and having a relatively narroW'land 8b and a consequently Wide channel 7b. lt Will'be quite obvious that if the vring 5b and its mate be inserted in the casing 1, the pump will have a relatively high capacity, Whereas if the ring 5a and its mate be inserted in the casing 1, the pump will have a relatively low capacity.

Of course, -it is to be! understood that ll might vary the inside diameters of the various pairs of rings to permit the use of impellers of various sizes, thus to provide for high and 10W speed rotation of the impeller, it being understood that high pressure and low volume are sometimes desirable, While at other times it is desirable' to have low pressure and high volume.

Other modes of applying the principle of my invention may be employed instead of the one explained, change being made as regards Vthe mechanism herein disclosed, provided the means as stated by any of the following claims or the equivalent of such stated means be employed.

Water channel, and a land dividing said channel from said aperture, an impeller journalled in said apertures, bearing on said lands, and extending into said channel, and sealing grooves in one of said lands.

3. In. a rotary pump, a pair of mating rings each of Which. comprises a bearing aperture, a Water channel, and a land dividing said channel from said aperture, journalled in said apertures, bearing on said lands, and extending into said channel, and a plurality of sealing grooves in one of said lands having their inner ends closed and their outer ends opening into said channel. 4. In a rotary pump, a pair of mating rings each of which comprises a bearing aperture,A

each of Which comprises a. bearing aperture, a-

Water channel, and a land dividing said chan nel from said aperture, an impeller. journalled in said apertures, bearing on said lands, and

extending into said channel, and a plurality of sealing grooves formed in one of said lands at an angle to the radii of the ring and having their inner ends closed and their outer ends opening int-o said channel.

6. In a rotary pump, a pair of mating rings each of Which comprises a bearing aperture, a Water channel, and a land dividing said channel from said aperture, an impeller journalled in said apertures, bearing on said lands, and extending into said channel, and a plurality of sealing grooves inone of said Ilands having their inner ends closed and their outer ends opening into said channel, the open end of each groove being in such a position as to be cut by a radius cutting the closed end of an adjacent groove.

7. In a rotary pump, a pair of mating rings each of which comprises a bearing aperture, a Water channel, and a land dividing said channel from said aperture, an impeller journalled in said apertures, bearing on said lands, and extending into said. channeland a plurality of sealing grooves in one of said lands, one; end of each groove being closed and the other end opening into said channel,

said grooves being inclined outwardly in the direction of Vrotation of said impeller.

8. In a rotary pump, a pair of mating rings A each of which comprises a bearing aperture, a water channel, and a land dividing said channel from said aperture, an impeller journalled in said apertures, bearing on said lands, and extending into said channel, and a plurality of sealing grooves in one of said lands' having their outer ends opening into said channel, and their inner ends connected by a partv annular groove.

'9. In a rotary pump, a pair of mating rings each of which comprises a bearing aperture, a water channel, and a land dividingsaid channel from said aperture, an impeller journalled in said apertures, bearing-on said lands, and extending into said channel, a plurality of scalinol grooves in one of said lands, the outer endbs of said grooves opening into said'channel, the outer end of each groove rotation of said impeller, and a part-annular being in such a position as to be cut by a radius cutting the inner end of an adjacent groove, and a closed, part-annular groove connecting the inner ends of said grooves.

10. In a rotary pump, a pair of mating rings each of which comprises a bearing aperture, a water channel, and a land divid ing said channel from said aperture,- an im'- pellerournalled in said apertures, bearing on sai lands, and extending into said channel, and a plurality of sealing grooves in one of said lands, the outer end of each groove opening into said channel, and said grooves being inclined outwardly in the direction of groove connecting the inner ends of said grooves.

11. A pump comprising a casing, a pair of matin rings mounted in said casing and forme to provide an enclosed water channel having an mlet port and an outlet port, and

an im eller mounted between said rings and exten ing into said channel, the outer portion of said channel being narrower than its inner portion.

12. A pump comprising a casing, a pair of lmating rings mounted in said casing and formed to provide an enclosed annular water channel having an inlet port and an outlet port, and an impeller mounted between said rings and extending into said channel, said impeller being adapted to be rotated to impress a velocity upon Huid contained in said channel, the volume capacity of said channel varying inversely with the velocity attained by such fluid. v

Signed by me this 2nd day of November,

GALE L. FERGUSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3399625 *Aug 23, 1966Sep 3, 1968Lucas Industries LtdLiquid displacement pumps
US4586877 *Jan 18, 1985May 6, 1986Nippondenso Co., Ltd.Electric fuel pump device
US4893986 *Sep 30, 1985Jan 16, 1990Rockwell International CorporationHigh-pressure high-temperature coal slurry centrifugal pump and let-down turbine
US4984964 *Jun 7, 1989Jan 15, 1991F.I.M.A.C. Fabbrica Italiana Macchine Aria Compressa S.P.A.Pump for refrigeration systems, in particular for aeronautical applications
US5375971 *Oct 4, 1993Dec 27, 1994Ford Motor CompanyAutomotive fuel pump flow channel design
US6984099May 6, 2003Jan 10, 2006Visteon Global Technologies, Inc.Fuel pump impeller
Classifications
U.S. Classification415/170.1, 415/168.2, 415/55.1, 415/202
International ClassificationF04D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04D5/002
European ClassificationF04D5/00R