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Publication numberUS1768640 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 1, 1930
Filing dateApr 17, 1929
Priority dateApr 17, 1929
Publication numberUS 1768640 A, US 1768640A, US-A-1768640, US1768640 A, US1768640A
InventorsLeo Sommer
Original AssigneeLeo Sommer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Level-crossing signal
US 1768640 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jul 1; 1930.

1.. SOMM ER LEVEL CROSSING SIGNAL sheets -sheet 1 Filed April 17. 1929 y 1, 0- L. sbMMER 1,768,640

LEVEL CROSSING SIGNAL Filed April 1'7, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet '2 24 FKC13.

NVENTOk- A TbQNEK Patented July 1, 1930 PTENT OFFICE LEO SOMER, OF MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA LEVEL-CROSSING SIGNAL Application filed April 17,

The invention relates to a level crossing signal, as described in the present specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawings that form part of the same.

The invention consists essentially of the novel features of construction pointed out broadly and specifically in the claims for novelty following a description containing an explanation in detail of an acceptable form of the invention.

The objects of the invention are to eliminate the dangers to life and property at highway railway crossings, whereby the motorist or vehicle driver will have ample warn ing of the dangers of approaching the railway track at the inopportune time; to warn the motorist considerably before the railway train reaches the crossing of the imminent danger of passing the signals; to furnish notices both visible and audible that wlll fully acquaint the driver of the vehicle wlth the fact that it is quite impossible to cross the railway tracks before the train reaches the highway, in consequence insuring fewer accidents if any at all; to avoid the necessity and the awkwardness of gates at country rail way crossings and also obviate the necessity of complicated mechanisms for operating such barriers and therefore relieve the municipalities of a burden of expense that is entailed in the installation and operation of gates at the innumerable level crossings throughout the land to insure simplicity and economy in the maintenance of a signal without in any way limiting its usefulness; and generally to supply to the public, the transportation companies and the municipalities a reliable, economical and efficient means of protecting the travellers by road from the dangers incident to the passage of railway cars and trains across the highway.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a side elevation of a railroad trackway showing the signals applied at a level crossing.

Figure 2 is a plan view of a railroad trackway and the highway crossing.

Figure 3 is a rear elevational View of the semaphores and operating mechanism.

Figure 4 is a side elevational view of the semaphores and operating mechanism.

1929. Serial No. 355,853.

Figure 5 is a detail showing an end view of the trip mechanism as installed in the railroad trackway.

Figure 6 is a detail of the trip mechanism showing a side elevational view.

Figure 7 is a sectional view of the road semaphore and showing the horn switch.

Figure 8 is a plan view showing the application of the invention to a double track.

Figure 9 is a detail of the cushioning memher in the operating line.

Like numerals of reference indicate corresponding parts in the various figures.

Referring to the drawings the warnings in this invention are, as has been mentioned hereinbefore, both audible and visible warnings, and are in the way of semaphores, one of which is a semaphore plate, indicated by the numeral 15, preferably of rectangular shape, and having displayed thereon the word Stop in self-luminous paint brought out on a red background, whence in the day time, the bright lettering for Stop is very vividly brought forth on the usual red danger sign.

The same thing occurs on the semaphore disc 16, on which also the word Stop occurs in self-luminous paint with a red background; other lettering may be added on both semaphores as may be thought advisable.

.The semaphore 15 is suspended from the arm 17 and this arm extends partly over the road from the post 18.

The plate is pivotally supported by the rod 19 in the pivot bearings 20 secured to said arm and the lever 21extends from said pivot rod so that in operating the lever 21, the plate 15 is swung upwardly and downwardly in turn for the Warning or clear signal.

.The connecting rod 22 is pivotally secured to the lever 21 and extends downwardly and is offset intermediately, and at the lower end is secured to the crank 23, and this crank is fixedly mounted on the shaft 24:, so that in the rotation of the shaft 24, the plate 15 is swung upwardly and swung downwardly by the movement of the crank 23.

The hub 25 is fixedly mounted on the shaft 24 and from this hub the sockets 26 and 27 extend at an angle of 45 one to the other,

and from the socket 2 6, the bar 28 extends and carries at-the end thereof the.weight 29, and from the socket 27 the flexible crank 30 extends, this flexible crank being in the form of a stiff helical spring which in itself forms the socket at the end for the staff 31, carrying at the end thereof the semaphore disc 16, so that when the cranks bring the plate and disc to their danger or signal position then the disc 16 is practically in front of the approaching vehicle, and if any vehicle oversteps its proper position in front of the danger signals, then all that can happen is the side pressure on the spring crank 30.

As this pressure continues, that is to say,

in an attempt to run through, the flexibly attached pin 32 from the inner end of the staff 31 forms an electrical connection, as this pin, which extends from the inner spring 33, extends through a ring contact 34, and this ring contact is connected by any suitable electrical connections to a siren electrical born 35, which is the audible signal; therefore as the motorist loses all caution in the attempt to pass the visible signal in the form of the semaphore disc, the siren draws his atten tion to his foolishness and the result is that he practically must stop as anyone who would not stop on such an occasion would pass through a gate.

The operating crank 36 is also mounted on the shaft 24, and is attached to the wires or cables 37, and these wires or cables 37 are connected to the trip levers 38 spring held by the springs 39 and pivoted in the tie brackets 40, these trip levers 38 being operated by the tread levers 41 pivotally supported from the same tie brackets.

The tread levers 41 are held by the trip levers 38 very slightly above the rails 42, so that the flange of the wheels on locomotives and cars of the train engage these treads to operate the trip levers and thereby operate the semaphores.

The cushion member 43 is formed of a casing having a swivel eye 44 on one end and the spring held eye rod 45 ext ending through the other end and supporting the encircling spring 46, between the shoulder 47 and the end of the cushion member 43.

The cables are attached to the eyes 44 and 45 and these cushion members take up the slack as well as minimize the effect of the operation on the semaphores, particularly the swinging semaphore plate.

The operating shafts 24, for there will be two of them, naturally, one on either side of the crossing, are connected by the sprocket and chain mechanism 48.

In the operation of this invention as the train approaches a level crossing it engages one of the tread levers, which in turn engages a trip lever, and this has the effect of moving the semaphore plate and also the semaphore disc into their warning positions over the highway.

It may be said in this connection that the disc may be a very light aiiair made of any suitable material so that there is actually no danger whatsoever in moving it over the roadway, besides the rate at which it moves to its position is so slow on account of its balancing weight that there is no sharp movement, such as would injure anyone standing at that place on the road, of course this disc can be made of rubber or it can be of canvas, with an extremely light frame, or such material as will positively be no menace in the operation. Besides it is flexibly supported at the inner end therefore it can in no way do much damage to persons or propertyand serves as a means of sounding a siren, which is of inestimable value as a final warning.

The arrangement of the treads is such as will leave quite suflicient space on either side of the cross-road so as to permit a comparatively long train to pass between and thereby avoid the danger of the tread levers being reset too quickly after the alarm signal is given and in the same way the alarm is given in ample time before the train shall actually traverse the cross-road.

It must be understood that this mechanical means of actuating the semaphore plate and semaphore disc may be replaced by electrical means, especially where the railways have the electrical installations necessary to operate mechanical devices for placing and resetting warning signals, and where such applications of the invention are made almost any skilled electrician may install the required actuating mechanism.

What I claim is 1. A level crossing signal comprising a standard having a bearing towards the lower end, an operatmg shaft journalled in said bearing, a crank suitably operated and mounted on said shaft, a hub having radial sockets and rigidly secured to said shaft, a semaphore arm secured in one of said sockets and carrying a stop sign and an arm carrying a counterweight and secured in the other socket.

2. A level crossing signal comprising a standard having a bearing towards the lower end, an operating shaft journalled in said bearing, a crank suitably operated and mounted on said shaft, and a trip arm spring-held to operating position and having cable connections to said crank, a hub having radial sockets and rigidly secured to said shaft, a semaphore arm secured in one of said sockets and carrying a stop sign and an arm carrying a counterweight and secured in the other socket.

3. A level crossing signal comprising a standard having a bearing, towards the lower end, an operating shaft journalled in said bearing, a crank suitably operated and mounted on said shaft, a hub having radial sockets and rigidly secured to said shaft a semaphore arm flexibly mounted in one of said sockets and spring-held therein and carrying a stop sign and an arm carrying a counterweight and secured in the other socket.

4;. A level crossing signal comprising. a standard having a bearing towards the lower end, an operatm shaft journalled in said bearing, a cra suitably operated and mounted on said shaft, a hub having radial sockets and rigidly secured to said shaft, a semaphore arm engaged by a helical spring secured in one of the sockets and havlng a flexibly attached in extending from an inner spring and efectricall connected to an audible signal, said semap ore arm carrying a sto sign and an arm carrying a counterweig t and secured in the other socket.

5. A level crossing signal comprising a standard having a bearing towards the lower end, an operatm shaft journalled in said bearing, a cran suitably operated and mounted on said shaft, a hub having radial sockets and rigidly secured to said shaft, a semaphore arm secured in one of said sockets and carrying a stop sign and an arm carryinga counterweight and secured in the other socket, and a connecting rod offset intermediately and secured at the lower end to a crank rigidly held to said shaft and pivotally secured at the upper end to a lever having a suspension stop sign and pivotally supported from said standard.

Signed at Montreal, Canada, this 26th day of March, 1929.

LEO SOMMER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6267332Jan 7, 2000Jul 31, 2001Robert E. AlmbladRailroad safety system
Classifications
U.S. Classification246/293, 200/276, 246/294
International ClassificationB61L29/00, B61L29/26
Cooperative ClassificationB61L29/26
European ClassificationB61L29/26