Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1769753 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 1, 1930
Filing dateMar 11, 1927
Priority dateMar 11, 1927
Publication numberUS 1769753 A, US 1769753A, US-A-1769753, US1769753 A, US1769753A
InventorsYancey Reuter Sara
Original AssigneeYancey Reuter Sara
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Garment buckle
US 1769753 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v Jul 1, 1930. s, Y, RE TER 1,769,753

GARMENT BUCKLE Filed March 11, 1927 v 33) AW Gum/14 v I Patented July 1, 1%30 SARA YANCEY REUTEB, OF NEW YORK, N.

GA MENT BUCKLE Application filed March 11, 1927. Serial No. 174,507.

My invention relates to garment fasteners and more particularly to such fasteners when applied to shoulder straps.

boulder straps on womens underwear 5 are usually sewed unto the garment and, if soiled or rumpled, must be ripped off to be replaced by fresh straps which againmust be sewed unto the garment. Furthermore,

the shoulder straps often have to be adj Listed, namely, lengthened or shortened, in accordance with the dress worn over the undergarment, and such adjustment can not be made when the straps are sewed on.

One of the objects of my invention is to provide means whereby shoulder straps may be en 'ily removed and interchanged without sewing. Another object is to enable one to lengthen or shorten the straps without detachin them from the garment and without removing'the garment, i. e. the adjustment may be made on the person wearing it. Other objects will become apparentfrom the detailed description which follows.

Referring to the drawing, Figures 1 to 5 are front views of several forms of my invention. Figure 6 isa cross section of the form shown in Figure 5 taken along the line 66. Figure 7 is a cross section of the form shown in Figure 1, with a shoulder strap in position. Figure 8 is a similar cross section of the forms shown in Figures 2 and 3.

My device maybe'described as a buckle or garment clip and it may be made of coinparatively stiff wire, as in Figures 1, 2, 3 and 5, or stamped out of sheet metal, as in Figure 4-.

When wire is used, I prefer to shape the wire to form three substantially;parallel bars 1, 1, 1, two of which have open ends. Thus, in Figure 1, the outer bars 1 and 1" are open, while in Figures 2 and 3, the mid dle bar 1 and oneof the'outer bars are. open. at one end. I he bars are properly spaced to allow a ribbon or strap to pass between them, the spacing being effected in various; ways of which the illustrations given in the drawing serve as good examples. Thus, i'i Figure 1, the spacing of the bars is plished by the formation of loops 2, th central portionwhereof, 3, is fialft led an provided with holes 4 t irough which a needle and thread may be passed to sew the buckleunto the garment. In'Figure 2, the loops 2, 2 are-smaller and closed, providing the necessary holes i for the same purpose as that of the holes 4 in Figure 1.

The openings in the bars need not be located at their ends but may be arranged to be at any other convenient place, as, for instance at the centers of the bars, such an arrangement being shown in Figure 4. Nor do I intend to have the invention confined to an arrangement three bars, since, obviously, more than three parallel bars maybe employed. Furthermore, while I prefer to 5 have openings in two of the three bars, I may also use an arrangement wherein only one bar has such an opening. The purpose of the opening is to enable one to slip the ribbon or strap into the space between two '70 consecutive bars, which operation becomes diflicultwhen all the bars are closed and the buckle is sewed on a garment. One opening of this kind will facilitate the operation, to some extent, while two openings in the case of three bars will be generally preferable. The number of openings should be increased with the number of bars.

It will be seen that at leasttwo of the barsare fixedly connected to, an adjacent 3 bar at one end. In the case of'three bars, two of thern'are so connected to the third one at one end. Thus, in Figures 1 and 5, the outer bars 1 and 1 are fixedly connected to the central bar 1 at one end, by means he of the corresponding end loops, the bar 1', in Figure 5, being, in addition, removably connected to the second end loop. In Figures 2 and 3, the outer barl and the central bar 1 are each fixedly connected to the sec- 50 end outer bar 1 at one end each, by means of the corresponding end loop. In Figure l, as in Figures 1 and 5, the split portions of the bars 1 and 1 are each fixedly eonnected to the central bar 1 at one end only, "through the end connections of the buckle.

To counteract the possibility of an execs sive tendency of the bars to come'together under the pull exerted by a strap, as will be c ear after the operation of the device is ex- "30 buckle out of sheet metal.

plained, I may form the loops 2 as in Figure 3, i. e. give the loops at double turn, as is bein done in safety pins, whereby the open end bars have a tendency to spread outward until pulled into parallelism by the action of the strap under tension.

I my also rovide my buckle with a snap catch, such, E)! instance, as is shown at 5 in Figures 5 and 6, whereby the open end of a bar may be closed after the ribbon or stra is in position. In these figures, such a catc is shown only for the bar 1", but, ohviously, I may provide a similar closing for the bar 1.

Instead of using wire, I may stamp the In Figure 4, is shown such a buckle. The openings in the bars 1 and 1" are shown in the middle of each bar this form being preferred in the case of sheet metal, although, of course, the openings maybe made at other points, as he'reinbefore mentioned. in Figure 4, the loops 2 are replaced by the and pieces 2.

To avoid rusting and discoloration, the buckle may be enameled or made of rust proof material, or it may be covered with any'suitable material. The end pieces or hope 2, which project beyond the bars, may be ornamented, if desired.

The application of my buckle or clip in practice will now be briefly explained.

Having reference, first, to Figures 1 and 7, the buckle or clip is sewed unto the gar- #6 went by passing a thread through the holes tondenc under the bar 1 and over the bar 1'.

4 in the end pieces or loops 2. To attach the strap to the garment, the loose end 7 of the strap is first slipped sidewise into the space between the bars 1 and 1', passing Next, through the opening at the end of bar 1", the loose end of the strap is slipped sidewise into the space between the bars 1' and 1', folded around the bar 1 and, again, slipped sidewise under the bar 1 through the opening at the end thereof, folded over the bar 1 and, finally allowed to loosely fall, concealing1 the bars. The pull on the strap, from w 'ch the garment now hangs, will be in the direction of the arrow in Figure 7. The strap will hold fast because of the snubbing effect due to the winding path around the bars. The harder one pulls, the faster does the strap hold in the clip. The snubbing effect is enhanced by the tendenc of the open end bars to be drawn to.- get r. To counteract this tendency, if excessive, as, for instance, when the wire is not sufiiciently stiff, I may use the form of device illustrated in Figure 3, the spring effect of the loops 2 in this case opposing the of the bars to be drawn together. strap is comparatively thick, and

When t the snubbing effect is sufficient to hold the it? pos tion against any pull, the form In the form shown of device illustrated in Figure 4, wherein the bars have little, if any, resiliency in the plane of the buckle, will be found to meet all the needs of the occasion.

The modus operandi in the case where the middle bar is open (Figures 2, 3) will be obvious from the foregoing, the modification of procedure being clear from Figure 8.

To adjust the length of the strap in all cases, one only has to pull it loose from the barswhen there is no tension on the strap, which may be readily done, and move the strap in one or the other direction until the strap is of desired length, after which a pull on the strap will again cause it to become fast in the buckle.

I claim:

1. A buckle adapted for the passage of a ribbon therethrough comprising a plurality of substantially parallel members and means for holding said membersin spaced relation to one another fixedly connecting at least two of said members to an adjacent member at one end only, said ineansbeing .sufliciently resilient to permit some or all of said members to be drawn together to the limit allowed by the thickness of said ribbon.

2. A buckle adapted for the passage of a ribbon therethrough comprising three substantially parallel members and means for holding said members in spaced relation to one another fixedly connecting two of said members to the third one at one end only, said means being sufiiciently resilient to permit at least two of said members to be drawn together into contact with the intervening portion of said ribbon.

3. uckle comprising, a plurality of at least three substantially parallel bars between which a ribbon may be passed, and resilient means for spacing said bars, said spacing and the resilienc of said means being such as to permit sait bars to be drawn together to the limit allowed by the thickness of said ribbon.

4. A buckle comprising three bars between which a ribbon may be passed, and means for holding said bars spaced substantially parallel to one another, said means being sufiiciently resilient to permit some or all of said bars to be drawn together into contact with the intervening portion of said ribbon.

5. A buckle adapted for the passage of a ribbon therethrough, comprising three substantially parallel bars, means fixedly connecting at least one of said bars to an adjacent bar at one end only for holding said bars in spaced relation to one another, and means for separably connecting said last mentioned bars at the other end, said spacing means being sufiiciently resilient to per- Wit some of said bars to be drawn to gether into contact with the intervening portion of said ribbon.

6. A buckle adapted to be attached to a piece of fabric, comprising a plurality of substantially parallel members for the passage of a ribbon therethrough, means connecting said members except for an opening across at least one of them for resiliently holding said members in spaced relation to one another, and means for securing said buckle to said fabric at said spacing means.

7. A buckle for the passage of a ribbon therethrough and adapted to be attached to a piece of fabric made of a single piece of wire bent to form three substantially parallel bars for the passage of a ribbon therethrough, the ends of said wire being open when said ribbon is passed between said bars, and means for securing said buckle to said fabric at the bends of said wire.

8. A buckle made of a single piece of wire formed into three substantially parallel bars, the ends of said wire being open, and means for separably closing one of said ends.

9. A buckle made of a single piece of wire formed into three substantially parallel bars'fixedly connected by cross members but leaving the ends of said wire open, and a separable connection between at least one of said ends and the adjoining one of said cross members.

10. The combination with a strap to be attached to a garment, of a buckle for the passage of said strap therethrough comprising a plurality of substantially parallel members, means for holding said members in spaced relation to one another fixedly connecting at least two of said members to an adjacent member at one end only, means for separably connecting at least one pair of the last mentioned adjacent members at the other end, and means for securing said buckle to said garment at said spacing means.

11. The combination with a strap to be attached to a garment, of a buckle for the passage of said strap therethrongh comprising three substantially parallel bars, means fixedly connecting all but twoends of said bars,said end connecting means being adapted to resiliently hold said bars in spaced relation to one another, and means for securing said buckle to said garment at said connecting means.

12. A bucklemade of a slngle piece of wire formed into three parallel bars and two substantially complete end loops fixedly connecting two of said bars to the third one, each at one end only, said loops constituting means for attaching said buckle to a. garment.

13. A buckle made of a single piece vof wire formed into three parallel bars and

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4907369 *Oct 22, 1987Mar 13, 1990Vomfell Anton LMulti-purpose stake
US5201099 *May 27, 1992Apr 13, 1993Masterlink Marketing Inc.Seat belt adjuster
US5935044 *Dec 4, 1995Aug 10, 1999Brewster; Lorie K.Method and apparatus for securing brassiere straps
US7051407 *Oct 4, 2004May 30, 2006Yu-Li HsuBrassiere strap clasp
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/198, 24/308
International ClassificationA44B11/02, A44B11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA44B11/02
European ClassificationA44B11/02