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Publication numberUS1770200 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 8, 1930
Filing dateMar 7, 1929
Priority dateMar 7, 1929
Publication numberUS 1770200 A, US 1770200A, US-A-1770200, US1770200 A, US1770200A
InventorsDaniel F Comstock
Original AssigneeComstock & Wescott
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building construction
US 1770200 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 8, 1930 D. F.IcoMsTocK I r:1,FZ/170,200

BUILDING coNsTUcTIoN Filed March 7, 1929 Patented July j 8, 1.930

nlvgJNrrEu STATES j'PATEN'r oFFlcE c DANIEL r. coiusT'ocx, or EosToN,` MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNoE To comsTocx a coTT, mc., or EoSToN, MASSACHUSETTS, A conronATIoN or MASSACHUSETTS :BUILDING v('IONSITRU'.CTION' Application me@ march, 7,

It is well known that vacuum insulation is many times more effective than other forms of insulation and this type has been used eX- tensively in thermos bottles and other small articles of tubular form wherein the shape is such as to. withstand the atmospheric pressure on opposite sides of the evacuated walls. The obj ect of the present invention is to make this type of insulation available for wall construction and more particularly to providesuch insulation in the form of flat slabs which may be setfedge to edge in walls, thereby to form a vacuum insulated wall of any desired dimensions.

Wall construction of the type referred to involves a number of problems foreign to the art of vacuum bottles, chief of which are-the following. Owing to the fact that the `units must be flat instead of tubular the flat sides must be bridged at frequent intervals by braces adapted to counteract the atmospheric pressure on opposite sides of the slabs and thus prevent the flat sides from collapsing toward each other. The opposite sidesv of the slabs must be sealed throughout a long distance (along each of their four edges), instead of merely around a small neck as 1n the case of thermos bottles, thereby making it imperative to'avoid seals of conducting material which would conduct a disportionate amount of heat. The slabs must be constructed sol that they may be transported and mounted in a wall without substantial danger of breakage and preferably'so that if the vacuum walls are accidentally broken after slabs do not collapse but still function as insulators comparable to the types now in use fdr refrigerator and building walls.

According to this invention the slabs preferably comprise two plates of glass, or other insulating material, sealedl together around their peripheries with an evacuated space therebetween containing the aforesaid pressure counteracting bridges, and insulating material on the outside of each plate and surrounding 'the aforesaid peripheries. The

,I i j glass plates may be integrally united either i lby fusing them together around their edges 5 04 after being separately'formed or by blowing the slabs have been incorporated in a wall the 1929. Serial No. 345,074.

a slab with parallel sides. The layers of insulation on opposite sides of the glass body or core have margins projecting beyondthe edges of the core and the spaces between the projecting margins may be7 lled with insulating material, preferably integral wit-h the aforesaid layers. While this insulation housing for the glassl core may be formed in various ways,asfor example. in the form of a continuous integral one piece covering' of molded material such as ground cork, it is preferably formed in two sheets of cork, fiber board, asbestos board, or other insulating material, in whichcase the aforesaid margins may be` made thicker so that they meet around 65 the core, thereby avoiding the necessity ofl using separate filling material around the periphery of the core. In any case the layers of insulation on opposite sides of the core are united together to form a unitary structure. 1While the layers may vbe united through the medium of the core, as by adhesion to the core, vthey are preferably united directly together around the periphery of the core.

'The invention is also preferablyv characterized -in that the insulation housing for the glass core is of such nature that it may bel nailed or screwed in place in the wall structure, thereby facilitating the process of erection and insuring permanency and rigidity of the resulting wall.

For the purpose of illustration typical embodiments of the invention are shown in the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is an elevation of a single unit; gig. 2 is a section on line 2--2 of Fig. 1,.; an Y Fig. 3 is a .partial section of a modification.

The particular embodiment shown in Figs. 1 and 2 comprises twoL glass plates 1 and 2, which are rectangular asushown in Fig. 1, and whichare fused together around-.their lperipheries as shown in Fig.V 2. The opposing faces of these plates are spaced apart to provide 'a space'3 which is evacuated 1n any suitable way. The/particular means for preventing the plates 1j and 2 from collapsing shown in Figs'. 1 and 2 comprises protuberances 4 which. project inwardly from each I portions which project/beyond the periphery,

of the core meet along the plane 7. The parts 6 may be secured together in any suitable way, as for example by cementing themtogether around their margins, or by cement- 'ing each sheet to the core, or in both ways.

The modification shown in Fig. 3 is similar to that illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, ex-

-sulating material"v seale cept in the following particulars. The pressure counteracting means is in the form of columns 4c', which may', be formedro any suitable insulating material such as wood, and held in place in anysuitable manner, as by cement. A Instead of silvering the opposing faces of the glass vplates 1 and 2, the space therebetween may be -filled with finely divided material, either in powder or rous form, such as for example a mixture of silocel and comminuted carbon. The insulation covering in Fig. 3 is shown as a one-piece enclosure molded around the core of any suitable insulating material susceptible to a molding operation, as for example celotex.

. I claim: 1

1. An insulation slab for use in buildingl `insulating walls, comprising two plates of insulating materlal sealed together around their peripheries with an.evacuated space therebetween anda layer of insulatin material on the outside of each plate, sai layers being united beyond said peripheries to form a unitary'structure which may readily be transported and'attached in position in a Wall. Y

2. An insulation slab-for use in building insulating walls, comprisin two plates o together around their peripheries with an evacuated space therebetween, insulating bridges distributed throughout said'evacuated space to counteract pressure o n the outer faces of the plates, and a layerof insulating material on the outside of` each-plate, said layers lbeing united beyond said peripheries. to form a unitary structure which may readily be transported and attached in position in a wall.

3; An insulation slab-for use in building insulating walls, comprisingtwo glass plates integrally united around theirv peripheries side of each plate and surrounding said peing ture which mayv readily be transported and attached in position in a wall.

Y 4. An insulation slab for use in building insulation walls, comprising two plates of insulation sealed together around :their peripheries with an evacuated space therebey tween, anda layer of material on the out-' side of each plate extending beyond said peripheries, the space between said layers outside said peripheries being filled with: insulating material, and said parts being secured together to, form a unitarystructure which may be safely transported and mounted in a wall.

5. An insulationvslab for use in building insulation walls, comprising two plates of insulation sealed together around'their peripheries with an evacuated space therebetween, and insulating materiall onthe out- S5 ripheries, the material on oppositesides being united beyondsaid peripheries to form a unitary structure whichmay be safely trailsportedand mounted( in position in a wa 6. An insulation slab for use in building insulation walls, comprising'two plates lof glass integrally united around their peripheries with an evacuated space' therebetween,

a layer of insulation on the'outside of each 2 plate with mar ins-projecting beyond said peripheries, an insulation ymaterial iilling the space between said projecting margins, said insulation being united together lto. form a housing for the glass. v

7. An insulation slab for use in-building walls, comprising two plates of glass inte` grally united around their peripheries with an evacuated space therebetewen, a layer of insulation on the outsidev of each plate with margins projecting beyond said peripheries, and insulation material lling the space between said projecting margins, said insula-v. tion material being integral with said layer insulation and 'all of said insulation being united together to form a housing for the lass.

Signed by me at Boston, Mass., this 13th day of November, 1928. v

- DANIEL F. COMSTOCK.

with an evacuated. space therebetween and a layer of insulating material on the outside of each late,- said layers being united beyond sai peripheries to form a unitary strucl

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3245195 *Jun 15, 1964Apr 12, 1966Evacuated Insulation Res LtdMethod of producing heat insulating panels
US5157893 *Jun 12, 1990Oct 27, 1992Midwest Research InstituteCompact vacuum insulation
US5175975 *Mar 23, 1992Jan 5, 1993Midwest Research InstituteCompact vacuum insulation
US5256858 *Aug 29, 1991Oct 26, 1993Tomb Richard HModular insulation electrically heated building panel with evacuated chambers
US5643485 *Nov 21, 1994Jul 1, 1997Midwest Research InstituteCooking utensil with improved heat retention
US8679599 *Mar 29, 2011Mar 25, 2014Corning IncorporatedLight-weight strengthened, low-emittance vacuum insulated glass (VIG) windows
US8821999 *Nov 5, 2008Sep 2, 2014Corning IncorporatedVacuum-insulated glass windows with glass-bump spacers
US8955358 *Mar 21, 2014Feb 17, 2015Corning IncorporatedVacuum-insulated glass windows with glass-bump spacers
US20120247063 *Mar 29, 2011Oct 4, 2012Richard Robert GrzybowskiLight-weight strengthened, low-emittance vacuum insulated glass (vig) windows
US20130105496 *Oct 31, 2012May 2, 2013Lg Electronics Inc.Refrigerator
US20140202209 *Mar 21, 2014Jul 24, 2014Corning IncorporatedVacuum-insulated glass windows with glass-bump spacers
DE975079C *May 10, 1953Aug 3, 1961DetagVerfahren zur Herstellung von Doppelisolierglasscheiben
WO1989009860A1 *Apr 13, 1989Oct 19, 1989Midwest Research InstCompact vacuum insulation
WO1991019867A1 *Jun 12, 1991Dec 26, 1991David K BensonImproved compact vacuum insulation
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/576, 65/58, 52/612, 184/27.4, 52/788.1
International ClassificationE04B1/80
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/803, Y02B80/12
European ClassificationE04B1/80B