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Publication numberUS1771400 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 29, 1930
Filing dateNov 1, 1927
Priority dateDec 30, 1925
Publication numberUS 1771400 A, US 1771400A, US-A-1771400, US1771400 A, US1771400A
InventorsDaubenspeck William J
Original AssigneeIgnition Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spark plug
US 1771400 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 29, 1930. w. J. DAUBENSPECK 1,771,400

SPARK PLUG Original Filed Dec. 50, 1925 Ali m2 F1 30 ing' igure 5; and

Patented July 29, 1930'- UNITED, STATES PATENT OFFICE J. naoanivsrncx, or CLEVELAND, gnio, ASSIGNOR TO THE mnrrion mu, racrunme COMPANY, or CLEVELAND, onro, a conronmron or 01:10 7

sranx PLUG Original application died December 30, 1925, Serial No. 78,362. Divided and this application Med 1 November 1, 1927.

lug valves or admitting air for cleansingv and coolingand for mixture with the explosi've charge. I The annexed drawing and the following description set forth in detail certain means embodying my invention, such disclosed means, however, constituting but two of the various forms in which the principle of the invention may be illustrated.

- shown in In said annexed drawing:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view, partially in elevation, of my improved spark plug, showing therein one form of an improved valve and valve support;

Figure 2 is a transverse horizontal section,

taken in the plane indicated by the line 2-2,

F' are 1; v I

igure 3 is a plan view of the elements Figure 1, certain parts beingre moved;

Figures 4; and 5 are detailed views of the form ofnvalve and valve sup ort shown in re 1, the valve supportv eing omitted i res 6 and 7 are detailed views of a modi ed form of valve and valve su ort.

As pointed out in my application, I r. No.

7 8,362, from which the subject matter of this application has been divided out, and re-- ferrin'g to the annexed drawing in which the same parts-are designated by the same respective ordinals in the several views,r'an.

annular s ark pl shell or body member 5 is formed with ii fiiexagonal to ber IQ is concentrically secured in the bodyg by a nut 11 engaging an internally-three portion 6 a and a lower externally-threade -plu por-- Serial No. 230,292.

wall the top portion 6 of the body 5. As 'I L shown in Figures 1, 2 and 3, valve inlets 1 4 are angularly disposed in the body 5 and coins.

municate with. the cha'mber 15 at their inner .ends and at their outer ends communicate! with ch'ambers28 disposed intermediately the airinlets 14 and the other inlets 24' extending to the outer surface-of the plug body portion 6. Theseinlets 24 are section than the inlets 14 and contain the -b a larger crossstems 22 of valves having heads 21 adapted to seat upon theoutere wall portions 29 of the chambers 28 and adapted-to be recipro cated between the inner wall portions 30 of said chamber and said seat portions 29. AS1

pass into the inlets 14: by the valve ead 21 when the latter is in its open" position and in contact with the inner wall portion 30.- The valve is contained within an annular cage or valve support 201press-fitted into openings'32 formed in -the top of the body .7 1

portion ,6. The piston suction stroke opens the valves and permits suction drawn jets of cleaning and cooling air'to be directed against the porcelain and to whirl in the chamber 15 and about the electrodes 8 and 9. so

The piston compression" stroke 'closes the valves upon the seats 29. An outer annular.

groove.17' formed in the porcelain 10 and connecting spiral grooves "18 cooperate. to

deflect and whirl the air in the chamber '15. 35

The ordinary electrode insulating porcelain is made relatively large to carry of! heat from combustion;v whereas, the air cooled and air cleaned porcelain herein shown mbiybe made relatively small. 7 n the form of valve structure shown 1 n Figures 6 and 7, the valve support 1s screw-threaded 'as at 26 for the purposes of adjustably securin the same in the valve body 5,,the outer ace'of the cage 25 being 05 formed with transverse slots 27 to receive a screw-driver, the valve head portion 31 also being formed with the transverse slot 23'to permit, as is also true of the .form of valve shown in Figures 4 and 5, the adjustment,

5 wall of the. body opening 32, as plainly indicated by the reference characters 33, this bottom wall serving to sto the suction-' drawninward movement of t e valve. F

It will be noted from the foregoing description that the reciprocating valves are formed with longitudinally-extending peripheral portions 22 and 31 which are spaced from the walls of the 'air openings formed in the cages 20 and 25 and other peripheral portions 21' which are adapted, in the open-posiof said air openings and, in the closed posi-. tion of. the valve, to be seated on saidwalls.

Thisrform of spark plug and valve may be "manufactured very economically, the valve members adding only slightly to the cost.

When used as an air valve 1n connection with.

the operation of spark plugs of internal oombustion engines, the suction stroke of the pissecured, so that provision for the passage of air from the space 24 to the space 14 is made through the medium of the transverse channel 23 formed in the inner face of the valve portion 31. The outer ortion' of the valve stem 22 rejects somew at beyond the face of the va ve support 20 or 25 so as to permit iqin'spection ofthe valve operation from the outside of the spark plug body. This outwardly-extending valve end portion also peren' by ressing' mite the valv'e-t o be held against this projecting end, erebyt e valve seat and channels can be-eleaned by a plying hot fies therethrough' and where'b the valve can tested. Also, by means o this projectingx valve end, the valvecan'beagitated if it s owe a tendency to stick.= An economically -produeed' ve of long 11 and sensitive satisfactoryoperation is obtained bythe means hereinbefore'described and shown in the accompanying drawing, and whenthe-said valve 'structure is used in connection with the operation of's'park in internal combustion en es, the result is to obtain a leaner combusti 1e mixture which is even more effective than a richer mixture in the same on me not provided, with my imr proved air vs vs, etlectinga very valuable c tion of the valve, to be spaced from the walls ton causes the automatically reciprocating open position, its inner face 34 is adapted to contact with the bottonrwall of the body structure within which the cage or is saving in fuel cost and a material reduction of the combustible fuels in the exhaust, re-' sult'ing also in the followin other'favorable results: providing air for t e cylinder mix: ture to more completely burn the less com bustible vapors in the cylinder; providing a surplus of oxygen, especially at "the spark plug to insure complete combustion of all caron atthis point; maintaining the s ark plug clean, and cool; removing accumu ated, car 0 n from the engine iston tops and the valve tops ahd the manifo d; obviating shortcircuitin "of the'ignition current; avoiding pro-ignition; greatly improving the quic pickup and power and general operation of the engine; and greatly reducing the work and time necessary to start a cold engine.

What I claim is:

1. An improved spark plug construction comprising a shell and an insulator therein with an annular space between the insulator and the shell, an open-ended cage fitted in the outer wall of said shell and adapted to form a valve support, a reci rocating member dispose m the cham r of said so port and formed with longitudinal perip e'ral ortions spacedfromthe walls of said cham r and other peripheral adapted in the inner osition of said valve member to be spaced cm the walls of said chamber'and in the outer position of said valve member to be seated on said walls, and a passage communicating with the interior of saidcage and said annular space, said passage bein formed with an outer enlarged portion 0 greater-[longitudinal magnitude than the length of the seating portion of said valve member to permit the reciprocation of the latter, the outward movement of said member closing, said passage by the seatin of the valve member on said cage walls, s'ai insulator being formed with outer peripheral grooves adjacent said annular space for proucing 'a whirling actionv of the air within the shell.

2.'An improved spark'plug construction comprising a shell and an insulator therein with an anular space between the insulator and the shell, an open-ended cage fitted in the outer wall of said shell and-adapted to form a valve support, a reciprocating valve disposed in the chamber of said support and formed with longitudinal peripheral portions spaced from the walls 0 said chamber, an intermediate connecting diagonal surface portion adapted in the inner position of said valve to be spaced from the walls-of said chamber and in the outer position of said valve to be seated upon said walls, and a passage communicatin with the interioraof said of greaterlongitudinal magnitu ban the length of theseating portion of said valve member to permit the reciprocation of-the valve rtions I 6 cage and said anh er space, said passage be- 7 ing' formed with an outer enlarged portion latter, the outward movement of said member closing said passage by the seating of the valve member on said cage walls, said insulator being formed with outer peripheral grooves adjacent said annular space for producing a whirlingaction of the air within the shell.

3. A spark plug comprising a shell and an insulator therein with a substantial annular space between the insulator and the shell, said shell having a valved passage leading from the exterior surface of the shell to said annular space and said insulator being provided with a groove in'a portion of its surface forming one wall of said annular space.

4. A spark plug comprising a shell and an insulator therein witlia substantial,annular space between the insulator and the shell, said shell having a valved passage leading from its exterior surface to said annular space and said insulator being provided with a groove in a portion of its surface situated in line with said passage.

5. A spark plug comprising a shell and an insulator therein of such size and form as to provide a, substantial annular space bet-ween the insulator and the shell, said shell having a valved passage leading from its exterior surface to said annular space and said insulator being provided with grooves in a portion of its surface situated below said passage.

6. A spark plug comprising a shell and an insulator having a portion within said shell of such size and form as to provide a substantial annular space between the insulator and the shell, said shell having a valved passage leading angularly through the shell from its exterior surface to said annular space and said insulator being provided with grooves in a portionof its surface situated below and in line with said passage.

7 A spark plug comprising a shell and an insulator having a portion within'said shell of such size and form as to provide an annular space between the insulator and the shell, said shell having a valved passage leading angularly through the shell from its exterior surface to said annular space and said insulator being provided with a spiral groove in line with said passage.

8. A spark plug comprising a shell and an insulator having a portion within said shell of such size and form as to provide a substantial annular space between the insulator and shell, said shell having a valved passage leading from its upper exterior surface to said annular space and said insulator being provided with grooves in a portion of its surface forming one wall of said annular space and situated below said passage.

9. A spark plug comprising a shell and an insulator having a portion within said shell of such size and form as to provide an annular space between'the insulator and shell, said shell having a valved passage leading angularly from its upper exterior surface to said annularspace and said insulator being pro? vided with a spiral groove in a portion of its surface forming one wall of said annular space and in line with said passage. 7

10. A spark plug comprising a shell and an insulator thereirr of such size and form as to provide a substantial annular space between the insulator and the shell, said shell having a plurality of valved passages leading angularly from its exterior surface tosaid annular space and said insulator being provided with a plurality of spiral grooves in line with said passages.

11. A spark plug comprising a shell and an insulator therein of such size and form as to provide an annular space between the insulator and shell, said shell having a plurality of valved, passages leading from its exterior surface to said annular space and said insulator being provided with annular and spiral grooves below said passages.

12. A spark plug comprising a shell and aninsulator having a portion therein of such size and form as to provide an annular space between the insulator and the shell, said shell having a passage leading from its exterior surface to said annular space, said passage being adapted to permit the entry of fluids into the spark plug and to prevent the escape of gases from the spark plug, and said insulator being provided with a spiral groove near said passage.

13. 'A spark plug comprising a shell and an insulator having a portiontherein of such size and form as to provide an annular space between the insulator and the shell, said shell having passages leading from 'its exterior surface to said annular space, said passages being adapted to permit entry of fluids into R the spark plug and to prevent the escape of gases from the spark plug, and said insulator having annular and spiral grooves near said passages.

14. A spark plug comprising a. shell and an insulator having a portion therein of such size and form as to provide an annular space between theinsulator and the shell, said shell having a passagegadapted to permit the passage of fluids intb the annular space and said insulator being provided with a groove in a portion of its surface forming one wall of said annular space and near sald passage.

15. A spark plug comprising a shell and an insulator having a portion therein of such size and space as to provide an annular space between the insulator and the shell, said shell having a passage adapted to permit entry of atmospheric air into the annular space when the pressure in the annular space is reduced below atmospheric pressure and said insu- 'lator being provided with a groove in a portion of its surface formingone wall of said annular space and below said passage. I

16. In a spark plug, the combination with a shell having a valved passage leading from its exterior surface to its interior surface, of an insulator having a portion of such size and form within the shell as to provide a substantial annular space between the insulator and the shell, said insulator being provided with a spiral groove in a portion of its surface forming one wall of said annular space and situated near said passage.

17. In combination with a substantially cylindrical shell having a valved passage leading from its exterior surface to its interior surface, an insulator having a portion of such size and form Within the shell as to provide a substantial annular space between the insulator and the shell and having an annular groove in a portion of its surface forming one wall of said annular space and situated near said passage.

18. In combination with a substantially cylindrical shell having a valved passage leading from its exterior surface to its interior surface, an insulator having a portion of such size and form within the shell as to provide a substantial annular space between the insulator and the shell and having annular and spiral grooves in a portion of its surface forming one wall of said annular space and situated near said passage.

Signed by me this 31st day of October,

WILLIAM J. DAUBENSPECK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4232242 *Aug 7, 1978Nov 4, 1980Hsu Yun TSparking plug with efficient air supplying system and a removable sitting device
US4383198 *Jun 8, 1981May 10, 1983Hosking John HFuel injection spark plug
US7011768Jun 16, 2003Mar 14, 2006Fuelsell Technologies, Inc.Mixing sodium hydride, aluminum and (n5-C5H5)2TiH2, heating the mixture to a temperature above 182 degrees C. to form a doped sodium alanate
US7169489Dec 4, 2002Jan 30, 2007Fuelsell Technologies, Inc.Hydrogen storage, distribution, and recovery system
US7279222May 21, 2004Oct 9, 2007Fuelsell Technologies, Inc.Solid-state hydrogen storage systems
US8066946Jan 30, 2007Nov 29, 2011Redmond Scott DHydrogen storage, distribution, and recovery system
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/31.00S, 137/533.31, 313/11.5, 313/120, 313/143
International ClassificationH01T13/14, H01T13/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01T13/14
European ClassificationH01T13/14