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Publication numberUS1772583 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1930
Filing dateMay 23, 1928
Priority dateMay 23, 1928
Publication numberUS 1772583 A, US 1772583A, US-A-1772583, US1772583 A, US1772583A
InventorsBarrett Edward F
Original AssigneeBarrett Edward F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game and game apparatus
US 1772583 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' prescribed rules. t

Patented Ang la, 1930- PATE T OFFICE 1 rEDWARD F. BARRETT, ,OFBUZFFALO, NEW YORK.

' 7 Application aiema i'es,

- This invention relates to games and game apparatus'and proposes-a game board having a checkered playing surface upon which sets of movablepieces are arrangedfor manipulation in a manner similar in a general way to the games of checkers, chess and the like.

An object of the invention is to combine the game of checkers and modified featuresofthe game of chess into a noveland highly enter- 10 taining game, the playing of which involves care and skill rather than chance. 1' v A further object is to arrange the. game board so that it is instantly available for the playing of the game of checkers as well as the game herein described and without the con fusion ordinarily attending the provision of auxiliary playing spaces. l

The invention contemplates a game board having a centrally located checkered surface such as is used for the playing of the ordinary and well known game of checkers and, in addition, a marginal area comprising asingle row of side and" end spaces which encom passes the centrallyrlocatedsurface and is spaced from suchsurfacesufiiciently to out: line it clearly. a a r r The end marginal spaces are checkeredto' conform to the checkered arrangement of the 7 central surface and these end spaces together. with the central surface, constitute the major playing'field whilexthe sidemarginal spaces constituteauxi'liary fields and are utilized for e the new or addedpieces which 'are intended for manipulation' over all fields according to The preferred form' of apparatus, is illustrated in the accompanying drawings,where- Figure 1 is 'a planfview of the game board 40 with the movablelpieces' ofoneset in position.- Figures'Q, 3 and 4 are side elevationsi'respectively ofrthe movable pieces-hereinafter termed captain, aide and checker piece.

The game board,Jasillustrated, is provided with a centrally disposed checkered surface 1 which is similarto the usual'playing surface utilized for the game of checkers. The surface 1, therefore, comprises a total of sixtygfour spaces arranged in the form of a light and dark.

G aeme em]; visfrrnim'rus 1928'. Serial in. 280,081.

square having eight spaces on each side. This surface isfurther arranged so that each diagonalrow of spaces is distinguishable from the next adjacent row and for thispurpose, the diagonal rows are alternately colored w The game board is also provided with end marginal spaces 2 which are "preferably spaced a slight, distance away from the surface 1 and laterallycoextensive with such si'i'rf'ace. The spaces 2 are preferably colored in the same manner asthe spaces of the surface 1 and arrangedto conform to and extend the checkered arrangement of the surface 1 for the full length of the board. 7 l

@The side margins of the "game board are provided with spaces 3 which are slightly spaced from'both the centralsurface 1 and the end marginal spaces'2. The side marginal spaces 3 and the central surface 1 are each divided into opposing halves by'a common center line 4 extending from one side of the board-to the other. The side marginal spaces 3on theoneside' of the centerline 4 are preferably given a light color and those on the other sideof the center'line4 a dark color;

In playing the game, the central checkeredv surface 1 andthe. end marginal spaces 2-con sti tute the majorplaying field'while the side I marginal spaces 3 constitute the auxiliary fields, the board, of course, being'divided into opposing halves by the center line 4. Each side or half of themajor playing field is pro vided" with a set of twelve movable pieces such as the usualc'hecker pieces 5, it bein understood, of course, that thepieces of eac set are colored so as to be distinguishable from the pieces of theother set, the color combination preferably being light and dark. The light pieces are initially arranged on alternate'spaces of thethree end rows as, for

instance, on the dark spaces of the end marginal row and the next two rows of the sure facegl. The dark pieces are similarly arranged on the dark spaces of the other side of the regular playing field. i JThesideS orhalves of the auxiliary field's lying! on one side of the center line 4 areassigned to a set of movable pieces, preferably consisting of three members, namely. a captain 6 and two aides 7, and the other sides or halves are similarly assigned to a like set, the pieces of the respective sets being colored light and dark. The light captain 6 is initially placed in an auxiliary field on a dark corner space of the board this space being known as the homeposition and preferably lying to the left of the player. The light aides 7 are initially placed on the dark corner and the next adjacent dark space of the opposite auxiliary field, that is to say to the right of the player. The dark captain and aides are similarly arranged on the other sides and in the light spaces of the auxiliary fields, the captain of one set and the aides of the other set being placed in the same auxiliary field. I The arrangement, as stated, is preferred but it obviously can be varied somewhat as desired. Asa measure of convenience the spaces for the initial positions of the captain and the aides may bear suitable distinguishin outlines 6F and 7 respectively.

egame is to be played with the idea of capturing the opposing captain or preventing his escape from his own home position, or capturing and occupying his home position, the first player to accomplish any one of these objectives winning the game.

The rules of the game are as follows: Each side is given one move at a time as in the game of checkers. The checker pieces 5 are'movable within the limits of the major playing field only and these pieces are governed entirely by the well known rules of the game of checkers. r The aides 7are movable along the particular auxiliary field spaces in which they are initially located but only up to the center line 4. They are also movable over the regular playing field but having once left their auxiliary field they cannot be returned to it or moved to the other auxiliary field. The aides may leave the auxiliary field by moving straight out or diagonally but they must in any case be moved to a dark space. The aides may also leave the auxiliary field by jumping an opposing piece. Obviously the jump must made diagonally. The aides cannot move from the auxiliary field directly across the center line either by a jump or otherwise but they must be moved to the major playing field beforethey can cross the center line. Once the aides aremoved to the regular playing fieldtheyare governed by the checker rules governing kings. The main purpose of the aides is to'clear the way for the captain 6. Thecaptain is movable into or out of any of the auxiliar field spaces and over the major playing fie d. It may leave any auxiliary field by moving straight out or diagonally but must, of course, be moved to a dark space. The captain may move from either auxiliary field directly across the center line only by jumping an opponent; otherwise he must'be moved out upon the major field before crossing the center line. When the ca tain is located upon the major playing fiel he is governed by the checker rules relating to kings. In addition he has a special privilege in that he is not obliged to jump an opponent if b doing so he will be placed in a position lea ing to his immediate capture.

It will be understood that the playing rules and conditions may be varied considerably, those described havingbeen found to provi e an enjoyableand interesting game.

I claim as my invention 1. A game board of the class described having a playing surface divided into spaces comprising a major playin field and auxiliary playing fields, each 0 said fields being divided into opposing parts by a common line, the spaces of the major playing. field being arranged V in parallel diagonal rows wherein each row has means distinguishing it from the next adjacent row, and the spaces of the auxiliary playing fields being arranged along the side margins of the major playing field, the auxiliary side fields on one side of the dividing line having means distinguishing them from the similar fields on the other side of the. line as and for the purpose set forth. i i

2. A game board of the class described having a playing surface divided into spaces comprising a major playing field and auxiliary playing fields, each of said fields being divided into opposing parts by a common line, the major field consisting of a centrally disposed checkered arrangement suitable for playing the game of checkers and oppositely disposed end spaces arranged to conform to and extend the checkered arrangement of the centrallydisposed spaces, and the auxiliary field consisting of spaces arranged along the side margins of the regular field, the auxiliary fied spaces on one side of the dividing line having means distinguishing them from the spaces on the other side of the line.

3. In a game apparatus of the class described a game board having a playing surface'divided into spaces comprising a major playing field and auxiliary playing fields, each of said fields being divided into opposing parts by a common line, the spacesof the major playing field being arranged in parallel diagonal rows wherein each row has means distinguishing it from the next adjacent row and the spaces of the auxilia play ing fields being arranged along the si e margins of the major playing field, the auxiliary fields on one side of the dividing line having means distinguishing them from the auxiliary fields on the other side of the dividing line, in combination with sets of movable pieces for said regular playing'field and other sets of movable pieces for said auxiliary fields. .l

4. In a game apparatus of the class described a game board having a playing surface divided into spaces comprising amajor a playin field and auxiliary playing fields,

each 0 said fields being divided into opfposeld ing parts by acommon line, the major consisting of a centrally disposed checkered arrangement suitable for playing the game of checkers and oppositely disposed end nation With sets of movable pieces for said major playing field and other sets'of movable pieces for said auxiliary fields.

5. In a game apparatus of the class described a game board having a playing surface divided into spaces comprising a major playing field and auxiliary playing fields,

eachof said fields being divided into oppos ing parts by a common line, the spaces of the major playing field being arranged in parallel diagonal rows wherein each row has means distinguishing it from the next adja:

cent row and the spaces of the auxiliary playing fields being arranged along the side margins of themajor playing field in combination with distinguishable sets of movable pieces for opposite sides of the regular playing field and sets of movable pieces for opposite sides of the auxiliary fields, the latter 7 sets having means distinguishing them from each other and from the major playing field sets.

In testimony WhGIGOfI hereby aflix my signature.

EDWARD F. BARRETT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2456098 *Nov 30, 1946Dec 14, 1948Albert H WheelerGame board and playing pieces therefor
US2760778 *Mar 15, 1955Aug 28, 1956Benton David WAmusement device
US3709498 *Sep 13, 1971Jan 9, 1973P ListonBoard game apparatus comprising play programming means
US4261574 *Dec 26, 1979Apr 14, 1981Rogers Jr Thurmond JBoard game
US4364568 *May 5, 1980Dec 21, 1982Tracy George TMethod of playing a strategy game
US4613134 *Oct 3, 1985Sep 23, 1986Tobin Gerard JMethod of playing a board game utilizing a board with different zones
US4696478 *Nov 1, 1985Sep 29, 1987Farrell Robert FNeutral zone, piece-capture game
USD645259 *Jun 19, 2009Sep 20, 2011Dsm Ip Assets B.V.Film sheet for use in antiballistic articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/260, 273/288
International ClassificationA63F3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/02
European ClassificationA63F3/02