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Publication numberUS1772601 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1930
Filing dateJan 5, 1929
Priority dateJan 5, 1929
Publication numberUS 1772601 A, US 1772601A, US-A-1772601, US1772601 A, US1772601A
InventorsDunham Berman S
Original AssigneeDunham Berman S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Thumb-sucking preventer
US 1772601 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

a- 1930. B. s. DUNHAM 1,772,601

THUMB SUCKING PREVENTER Filed Jan. 5, 1929 Patented Aug. 12, 1930 BEnMAiv s. DURHAM, or TOLEDO, onIo i rnuMn-suoxme rnnvnn'rna Application filed January 5, 1929. Serial No.330,509.

This invention relates to devices for pre venting a baby from sucking its thumb or fingers,and an object is to provide asimple and l efficient device of this character Which may be. readily and conveniently applied to the arm of an infant, and with which there is no liability of chafing the skin, but'isso designed as to permit the natural movementof the arm up to a predetermined point sufiiciently spaced from the head as to interfere withthe infant placing its thumb orfingers in its mouth. Another object ofthis invention is to provide a new and improved device 7 of the above character having the features of construction and arrangement hereinafter described. 1

An outstanding characteristic of this invention. resides in the provision. of athumbsucking preventerfwhich consists generally in a pair of sleeves, one of which is attached to the arm above the elbow and the other below the elbow. Connecting the sleeves there is a pivotal joint which isfpositloned substantiallyin line with the axis of the elbow joint, so that bending movement of the arm, simulating a hinge in its action, isimparted to the pivotal connection between the sleeves. Associated withthepivotal connection is a stop which limits the swinging or hinge- 30 like movement of the arm' toward the head,

thereby enablingthe infant to move its arm in a free and natural way up to a certaln point where further movement isprevented so that j I thethumb cannot berpla'ced in the mouth "3 without assuming a forced and somewhat cramped or uncomfortable position, I

.For purposes of illustratlon, andjnot of limitation, one embodiment of the invention shown on the accompanying drawings, in 4 Which: j

' Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a thumb-suck ing preventer, the arm of an infantbelng 1n-, dicated by the 19 and dashlmes;

Fig. 2 is aside elevation showlng the device straightened out and more clearly illustrating the hinge connection;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged transverse section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged section on the line -44 ofFig. 2; and 1 i Fig. 5 is a side elevation of the device show ingthe lacing-and the covering for the metal parts. r

The illustrated embodiment of the invention comprises a device'for preventing an infant from sucking its thumb and fingers, and as shown, consists of a pair of metallic frame members A and B, similarly shaped and constructed. Each member consists of side members 1 and 2 and end members 3 and 4. 6'0 The end members 3 and 4 are curved in or 'der to fitjsnugly against the arm aboveand below the elbow. Projecting fromthe end member 4 is an arm 5 curving slightly away from the plane of the end member 4 and terminating in a disc-like end portion 6. The end portion 6 of one of the arms 5 is formed with a slot 7 and projecting fromlthe end portion of the other arm 5- is a rivet 8 extending into the slot 7. A plate 9 is disthat other pivotal joints and stop arrangementsmay be used to advantage, and will an;

be considered as embraced within the purview of this invention.

Enclosing the frame members A and B and the pivotal joint is a fabric covering 11, and, as shown in Fig. 3, the fabric consistsv of as three plies of canvas, which is wrapped around the framework heretofore described 13 for holding the sleeve in position. The

hinge connection heretofore described is also encased in a fabric covering-"14, whichconw plied to the inner side of the arm so that the lacing can be conveniently adjusted on the outsi By inner side of the arm, I mean the side of the arm toward the body when the arm is in the anatomical position, the arm being extended parallel to the side of the. body with the palm facing forwardly. Instead of applying the device to the inner side of the arm it may be applied to the outer side, if desired. 7

By applying the device either to the inside or outside ofthe arm, the pivotal connection thereof is positioned substantially in line with the axis of the elbow joint so that hinge movement of the arm imparts substantially corres onding movement to the device. This provi es forfree and natural movement of the arm at all times, and operates only to limit themovement of the forearm toward the head so as to prevent the infant fromplacin its thumb and finger in its mouth.

rom the above description, it will be apparent that the members connecting the cuffs 0r sleeves are disposed laterally in relation to the elbow point on either its medial or external surface when the arm is in anatomical position. When in this position, the axis of the movable joint of the two members coincides substantiall with the axis of the natural hinge joint 0 the elbow.

Thus disposed and thus applied, in whatever position of flexion or extension the arm may assume, the cuff members remain at an equidistant position from the axis of the elbow joint and at the identical position, m relation to the enclosed parts of the arm, at which the cuffs were applied.

In priordevices, in which the attachment of the connecting members have been disposed to'the back or the front of the elbow joint, it is apparent that there is an alternate pulling and thrusting force on the cuffs accompan ing each flexion and extension movement. 0 the arm. The resultant change in the longitudinal position of the cuffs in relation to enclosed tissues of the arm, accomanying each movement of the arm, is profi'uctive of an undesirable pull or rubbing action on the underlying skin.

In accordance with this invention, there is no liability of the sleeves rubbing, irritating or annoying the infants skin, because the ivotal connection between the frame part is properly positioned with respect to the elbow, and does not interfere with the natural to movement of the skin at the elbow. Failure to provide for such movement has been one of the reasons for the lack of success on the part of similar devices heretofore proposed.

Although I have shown and provided a construction which is the best form known to me at this time, it is to be understood that numerous changes in details of construction and arrangement may be effected without departing from the spirit of the invention, especially as defined in the appended claims.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A thumb-sucking preventer comprising a pair of rigid plate members curved for partially embracing a side of the arm above and below the elbow respectively, flexible fabric cuff enclosingand sccuredto each plate member for holding the same inplace on the side of the arm, a strap rigid with each plate member and extending therefrom longitudinally of the arm, a pivotal connection between the free end portions of said straps adapted to be positioned at the axis of elbow, and a stop associated with said pivotal connection for limiting the movement of said cufl' members toward each other.

2. A thumb-sucking preventer com rising a pair of rigid plate members curved or partially embracing a side of the arm above and below the elbow respectively, a flexible fabric cuff enclosing and secured to each plate member for holding the same in place on the side of the arm, a strap rigid with each plate member and extending therefrom longitudinally of the arm, a pivotal connection between the free end portions of said straps adapted to be positioned at the axis of the elbow, a stop associated with said pivotal connection for limiting the movement of said cuff members toward each other, and a flexible fabric covering for said straps and pivotal connection.

3. A thumb-sucking preventer comprising a pairof rigid plate members curved for partially embracing the arm above and below the elbow respectively, said plate members being of skeleton form to reduce to a minimum the amount of rigid surface engageable with the arm, a flexible fabric cuff enclosing and secured to each plate member for holding the same in place on the side of the arm, a strap rigid with each plate memberiend extending therefrom longitudinally ofthe arm, a pivotal connection between the free end portions of said straps adapted to be positioned at the axis of the elbow, and a stop 1 associated with said pivotal connection for limiting the movement of said cuff members toward each other. j r

In testimony whereof I have hereunto signed my name to this specification.

BERMAN S.DUNHAM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2959168 *May 8, 1957Nov 8, 1960Shook Ross O SKnee brace
US3074723 *Mar 22, 1960Jan 22, 1963Clement EstyGolfing practice aid
US3189073 *Jun 13, 1962Jun 15, 1965Todd Robert HArm purse and hand purse
US4614181 *Nov 7, 1984Sep 30, 1986Rehband Anatomiska AbHinge for knee joint bandage
US5403002 *May 18, 1993Apr 4, 1995Brunty; Steven H.Throwing arm training device
US5509426 *Jun 9, 1994Apr 23, 1996Sowerby; Frederick O.Arm brace
US6762687Jun 20, 2002Jul 13, 2004David PerlmanBiofeedback device for treating obsessive compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSDs)
US7476102Jun 9, 2006Jan 13, 2009Maples Paul DContamination avoiding device
US8585588Nov 18, 2010Nov 19, 2013Nohands, LlcMethod and system for preventing virus-related obesity and obesity related diseases
US8591412Nov 18, 2010Nov 26, 2013Nohands, LlcMethod and system for preventing virus-related obesity and obesity related diseases
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/881
International ClassificationA61F5/50
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/50
European ClassificationA61F5/50