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Publication numberUS1772815 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1930
Filing dateFeb 14, 1930
Priority dateFeb 14, 1930
Publication numberUS 1772815 A, US 1772815A, US-A-1772815, US1772815 A, US1772815A
InventorsMandrich Nicholas P
Original AssigneeMandrich Nicholas P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable monoplane
US 1772815 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 12, 1930. N. PIMANDRICH ADJUSTABLE MoNoPLANE Filed Feb. 14, 1930 4 Sheets-Sheet Inventor ug- 12, 1930 N. P. MANDRlcH DJUSTBLE MONOPLNE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 14, 193 O Aug. 12, 193ol Filed Feb. 14, 195o 4 Sheets-Sheet Inventor A torney g- 12, 1930- N. P. MANDRicH 1,772,815

ADJUSTABLE MONOPLANE Filed Feb. 14, 1959 4 sheets-sheet 4 Y characters Patented Aug. 12, 1930 ,PATENT OFFICE NICHOLAS MANDBICH, 0F BROOKLYN, NEW 'YORK ADJUSTABLE MoNorLANn i Application led :Februaryv 14, 1930. Serial No. 428,409'.

This invention relates t0-aeroplanes and is particularly adaptable to monoplanes. i

An object of the invention is to provide a monoplane that is designed with special adjlstments to improve the safety of the aeroane. p Another feature of the invention is to provide for regulation of the wingsat increased or decreased speeds and to further provide a short fuselage and extensible wings, which would be more readily controlled.

A further feature of the invention is to provide a triangular nose wing, rockable lon a horizontal axis, the apex ofwhich is in alignment with the nose of the fuselage to prevent diving at the take-olf or landing, and at the same time to provide for` safe control in the event of motor trouble. j

Further objects of the invention are to provide in a manner as hereinafter set forth, an-

aeroplane of the character referred to, that is strong, compact and durable, thoroughlyire-` liable for its intended purpose, very easy in lts method of assembly. and comparatively inexpensive to manufacture and operate.

With the foregoing and other objects in View, the invention consists in the novel arrangement, combinationof parts as will be hereinafter more specifically described and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, but it is to be understood that changes, varlations and modifications may be resorted to, Without departing from the spirit of the claims hereunto a pended.- j

In the rawings, wherein like reference denote corresponding parts throughout the several views Figure 1 is a side elevation of the aeroplane in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is 'a top plan view thereof.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary horizontal section, taken substantially on lines 3-3 of F igure 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary vertical section through the stationary transverse Wing, taken substantially on the line 4 4 of Figure 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 5 is a transverse section in detail,

and taken substantially on line 5--5 of Figure 2 and looking in the direction of thel arrows.

Figure 6 is a' longitudinal vertical section in detail, and taken substantially on line 6-6 of Figure 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 7 is a vertical longitudinal section in detail, through the fuselage andwing taken substantially on the line 7-7 of Figure 2 -and looking in the direction of the arrow. and Figure 8 is a transverse vertical section in detail, taken through the longitudinal wing and fuselage, substantially on the line 8-8 .of Figure 2 and looking in the direction'of the arrows.

Referring to the drawings in detail, 9 indicates generally a cigar shaped fuselage, disposed longitudinally with the blunt end forward'and the pointed end to the rearward. On the blunt end l0 of the fuselage is supported the motor 11, projecting forwardly from which and rotatably connected therewith is the main propeller 12, the intermediate portion of the fuselage 9 being used for carrym'g passengers or freight andis provided with windows 13 and a door 14.

Forwardly of the central compartment is the cockpit 15, having a forward wall 16'and an instrument boardl? at the upper end of the forward wall. At the upper portion of the cockpit, there is provided Window panels 18 that extend around three sides of `the cockpit to provide vision from all angles.

At the rear of the fuselage is a vertical upstanding iin 19, to the trailing edge of which is rockably connected the rudder 2O and on each side of the rudder are the elevating planes 21 that are rockably connected at their leadi2n2g edges to oppositely disposed lateral The rudder and elevator planes are conwill be inoved tothe left and vice versa.

plurality of brake levers 46 are pivotally lage at equal distances. From the trailing edge of the portions of the stationary wing 23 extend the conventional ailerons, 24, 25, and these ailerons are rockably connected to the trailing edges of the extending portions. The ailerons may be controlled by any conventional means w'ithin the reach of the pilot in the cock it 15. The upper face26 and lower face 27) are suitably spaced from each other by channel bars 28, 29, which are coextensive with the leading and trailing edges thereof. The space between the upper and lower faces of the wings provides a transverse pocket 30 Vthroughout the entire length of the wings.

The ends of the stationary transverse wing 23 are open to receive the extensible sections 31,` 32, which slide in and out of the pockets 30. Along the lwebs of the channel bars 28, 29, there are mounted a plurality of spaced rollers 33, 34, which bear against the leading and trailing edges of the extensible sections 31 and 32. At the opposite ends of the stationary wings, there are also a series of roll-l ers 35, 36, which are secured to the ribs on the upper and lower faces 26, 27, respectively that bear against the upper and lower faces of the lateral wing sections so as to facilitate the movement of the wing sections with ease and dispatch. The longitudinal ribs 37 of extensible wing sections 31. and the longitudinal ribs 38 of extensible wing sections 32. extend beyond the confronting ends of these wing sections into the pockets 30 of the stationary wings. These oppositely extending rib extensions 37 and 38 are disposed between each other, so as not to interfere with their movement; A cone clutch 39 ismounted on the lower portion of a threaded. rod 40 and is th'readably supported on a bracket 41, which bracket is secured to the channel'bar 28.. Connected to the cone clutch 39 is-a hand wheel 42, that extends. into the attachment for moving the cone clutch 39 up or down. A transverse rod 43 is slidably mounted on the channel bars 28 and 39 and is formed at the forwardv end with plates 44, in which there is a slot 45. The cone clutch 39 extends through the opening or slot 45, so that when the cone is moved upwardly the rod 43 mounted adjacent their upper ends as at 47, and these brake 1evers46 have cam surfaces 48 on their upper ends that engage with the rib extensions 37 and 38. There is one brake leverA for each rib extension. The lower ends ofthe plurality of brake levers are connected with the transverse rod 43, so that when the cone. clutch moves the rod, the cam fa'ces 48 will bear against or retract from the rib extensions.-

- It therefore follows that the wing extensions 31 and 32ma be locked by the brake levers inany desire position. A pair of rack 49, 50, have teeth along their inner longitudinal edges which engage with a pinion 53, that is secured to a vertical shaft 54, that isjournaled through a pocket 30 in the wings. The

lower end of the shaft 54has mounted there# on a hand wheel 55, which is in the cockpit of the aeroplane within reach of the pilot. The in'ner ends of the rack bars are each provided with abutment lugs 56., 57, which abut against the cross bars 51, 52, to limit the outward movement of the respective extensible extensions 31, 32. The outer ends of rack bars 49, 50, are respectively connected to the confronting endsv of extensible sections 32, 31. In view of the,foregoing,- it will be seen that movement of the hand wheel 55, causes rack bars 49 and 50 to move inwardly causing the extensible sections to move inwardly into the pockets or outwardly therefrom as desired.

To theleading edge of the stationary transverse wing 1'23 is-rockably connected the `triv angular shaped wing indicated generally at 59. The trailing edge ofthis triangular wing is mounted on a shaft 60 that is supported coextensive with the leading edgeof the stationary transverse wing 23, on brackets 61, the inner ends of which are vsecuredto the channel bars 2 .n

The wing 59 is in the shape of an isosceles triangle, the face of which forms the trailing edge, and the apex thereof the leading edge. The apex of the wing is located adjacent the 4nose of the fuselage. The upper face 62 of the triangular wing is fiat and the lower edge 63 of the triangular wing is flat. These fiat faces decline forwardly from the trailing tol A which there isa miter gear 69. This miter gear 69 engages with a miter pinion 70, on the end of the rod 71 and is journaled through an opening in the forward wall 16 of the cock pit 15. On the inner end of this rod 71 is a hand wheel 72 that is operated' by the pilot. Depending from the lower face 63 of the wing 59 is a bar 73, which extends through an opening in the fuselage, and the inner end of this bar "73 is calibrated as at 74, to give the angle of inclination of the triangular win 59. The calibrations on the rod 73 are behind a glass panel 75 mounted in the instrument boardl 17 so that the calibrations may be-seen by the pilot.

35 These brackets are v of the fuselage and forwardly of the center the inclination of the triangular wing 59.

A longitudinal wing is indicated generally at. 7 6. The leading edge of th-e longitudinal Wing 76 merges with an intermediate portion of the trailing edge of the stationary trans- 10 verse wing 23. The longitudinal wing 76 is materially longer than the width of the transverse wing and also materially longer than the altitude of the triangular wing 59. The longitudinal median of the wing 76 is along the center line of the fuselage and coincides with the center of the transverse wing and the altitude of the triangular wing. This Wing 76 is disposed tangentially with respect to the upper wall of the fuselage and is suitablyY supported thereby. The longitudinal wing 76 is Atransversely curved as will be clearly understood by referring to .Figure 8 of the drawing. The trailing edge of the longitudinal wing terminates forwardly of the vertical wing 19 that supports the rudder. On the top of the wing 76 is a hingedly connected door 77 by which access may be had to the interior of the fuselage.

Depending from the rear end of the fuse-l lage 9 is a tail skid 10. Supported laterally from the sides of the fuselage are a pair of angular struts 79, 80, on the lower ends of which are supported ground engaging wheels 81.

intermediate the ends thereof. To each strut 79, 8C, are connected the lower ends of supporting brackets 83 and the upper ends ofithese brackets are connected to the lower face 27 of the stationary horizontal section 23. Mounted on the brackets 82 and 83 are internal combustion engines 85, 86, that drive the auxiliary propellers 87, 88. The propellers 87', 88, are disposed laterally of the main propeller 12 and rearwardly therefrom. Furthermore, the propellers 87, 88, areV disposed under the triangular wing 59. Y

l It is to be understood that various changes ff' in the shape, size and arrangement of parts may be resorted to, without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

Having described the invention, what is claimed as new is:

1. An aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a transverse extensible wing secured to the top of the fuselage, and projecting from both sides thereof, a triangular wing rockably con- 50 nected along its base to the leading edge of o said transverse wing, and a stationary 1ongitudinal wing extending from an intermediate portion of the trailing edge of said tra v in 5 ns ersew g An aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a

transverse extensible wing secured to the top o f the fuselage, and projecting from both sldes thereof, a triangular wing rockably connected along its base to the leading edge of saidtransverse wing, and a stationary longitudinal wing extending from an intermediate portion of the trailing edge of said transverse wing, said longitudinal wing being transversely curved.

3. An aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a transverse extensible wing secured to the top of the fuselage, and projecting from both sides thereof, a triangular wing rockably connected along its base to the leading edge of said transverse wing,j and a stationary longitudinal wing extending from an intermediate portion of the trailing edge of said transverse wing, said longitudinal wing being transversely curved, upper and lower faces of said triangular wings oppositely declined from the trailing to the leadin edge.

4. An aeroplane comprising a fuse age, a transverse extensible wing secured to the to of the fuselage, and projecting from bot sides thereof, a triangular wing rockably connected along. its base to the leading edge qf said transverse wing, and a stationary longitudinal wing extending from an intermediate portion of the trailing edge of'said transverse wing, said extensible wing formed with'a central stationary section having a pocket extending throughout its length, and lateral wing sections movably mounted in the pocket. 5. An aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a transverse extensible wing secured to the top of the fuselage, and projecting from bot sides thereof, a triangular wing rockably connected along its base to the leading edge of said transverse wing, and a stationary longitudinal wing extending from an intermediate portion of the trailing edge of said transverse wing, said extensible wing formed with a central stationary section having a -pocket extending throughout itsil'ength, and lateral wing sections movably mounted in the pocket, rack bars extending inwardly from each lateral section, a pinion supported in the stationary section between the rack bars, and means for turning the pinion to move the lateral sections.

6. An aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a transverse extensible wing secured to the top of the fuselage, and projecting from both sides thereof, a triangular Wing roclrably connected along its base to the leading edge of said transverse wing, and a stationary longitudinal wing extending from an intermediate portion of the trailing edge of said transverse Wing, said extensible wing formed with a central stationary section having a pocket extending throughoutV -its length. and lateral wing sections movably mounted in the pocket, and means supported in the stationary wing section for moving said lateral sections.

7. An'aeroplane comprisinga fuselage, a

transverse extensible wing securedto the top the Wing on its axis, and means depending of the fuselage, and projecting from both from the triangular Wlng 1 nto the fuselage sides thereof, atriangular Wing rockabl confor registering the inclination of the Wlng.

nected along its base to the leading e ge of said transverse wing, and a stationarylongitudinal Wingextending from an intermediate portion of the trailing edge of said transverse Wing, said extensible Wing formed with a central stationary section having a pocket extending throughout its length, and lateral Wing sections movably mounted in the pocket, and means supported in thefuselage and engaging the triangular Wing for tilting the Wing on its axis. t

8. An aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a transverse extensible wing secured to the top of the fuselage, and projecting from hothI sides thereof, a triangular Wing rockably connected along its base to the leading edge of said transverse Wing, and a stationary longi' tudinal wing extending from an intermediate portion of the trailing edge of said transverse wing, said extensible Wing formed with a cen-- tral stationary section having a pocket exe tending throughout its length, and lateral wing sections movably mounted in the pocket, extension bars projecting interiorly of the stationary wings from the confronting` ends of the lateral sections and locking means engageable With said extension bars to hold the lateral Wings in adjusted position.

9. An aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a transverse extensible Wing secured to the to of the fuselage, and projecting from bot sides thereof, a triangular Wing rockably connected along its base to the leading edge of said transverse Wing, and a stationary longitudinal Wing extending from an intermediate portion of the trailing edge of said transverse Wing, said extensible Wing formed with a central stationary section having a pocket extending throughout its length, and lateral wing sections movably mounted in the pocket and means supported in the stationary wing section for moving said lateral sections, extension bars projecting interiorly of the stationary Wings from the confronting ends of the lateral sections and locking means engageable with said extension bars to hold the lateral wings in adjusted position.

10. AnA aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a transverse extensible wing secured to the top of the fuselage, and projecting from both sides thereof, a triangular wing rockably connected along its base to the leading edge of said transverse wing, and a stationary longitudinal wing extendin from an intermediate portion of the trailing edge of said transverse wing, said extensible wing formed with a central stationary section having a 'ocket extending throughout its length, and ateral wing sections movabl mounted in the pocket, and means supported7 in the fuselage and engaging the triangular wing for tilting In testimony whereof l aix my signature.

'NICHOLAS` P.- MANDRICH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2941752 *Dec 31, 1953Jun 21, 1960United Aircraft CorpAircraft with retractable auxiliary airfoil
US6098927 *Nov 19, 1998Aug 8, 2000Gevers; David E.Multi-purpose aircraft
US6834835Mar 12, 2004Dec 28, 2004Qortek, Inc.Telescopic wing system
US7789343Jul 24, 2007Sep 7, 2010The Boeing CompanyMorphing aircraft with telescopic lifting and control surfaces
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/218
International ClassificationB64C3/54, B64C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB64C3/54
European ClassificationB64C3/54