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Publication numberUS1772955 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 12, 1930
Filing dateMar 28, 1929
Priority dateMar 28, 1929
Publication numberUS 1772955 A, US 1772955A, US-A-1772955, US1772955 A, US1772955A
InventorsJohn V Moore
Original AssigneeMoore Fabric Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Curvilinear elastic fabric
US 1772955 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 12, 193). J, v. MOORE 1,772,955

CURVILINEAR ELASTIC FABRIC Filed March 28, 1929 E L Ff Z JZ Y j ,za 2 IZ @reiterated ng. i12, i936 JGHN V. vIIIOQRE, 0F PAW'IUCKET, RHODE ISLAND, ASSIGNOR TO MUORE FABRIC COM- PARTY, @F PAWTUCKET, RHODE ISLAND, A CORPORATION 0F RHODE ISLAND CURVILINEAR ELASTIC FABRIC Application led March 28, 1929. Serial No. 350,870.

This invention relates to a curvilinear elastic fabric suitable for use in articles of apparel such as garters,garter belts or sanitary belts.

It is the object of my invention to provide a curvilinear elastic 4fabric particularly adapted to such uses and so constructed that it may be made in any narrow ware loom without substantial alteration thereof and that it may be woven at the same speed and with the same ease as ordinary straight elastic fabric.

A further object of the invention is to provide a fabric in which the curvature is produced and controlled by the relative sizes of certain threads which act as weft for the edge portions of the fabric.

fy invention further relates to arrangements |and combinations of parts which will be hereinafter described and more pa-rticularly pointed out inthe appended claims.

A preferred form of the invention and certain modifications thereof are shown in the drawings in which Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic plan view of a. portion of my improved fabric;

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view illustrating the sizes and relations of the several threads;

Figs. 3 and 4 are views similar to Fig. 2 but showing somewhat modified constructions; and

Fig. 5 is a plan view of a portion of curvilinear fabric, as produced by my invention.

Referring to Fig. l, my improved curvilinear elastic fabric comprises elastic warp threads 10, non-elastic binder warp threads 12, a lling thread F and additional nonelastic threads W and W to be described.

ln drawing the warp threads 10 and 12 into the harnesses, the warps are divided into a middle section A and two edge sections B and B. ln the middle section A, the warp threads 10 and 12 are raised or lowered after each insertion of a piek of filling, so that successive picks are bound in between the elastic and non-elastic warps, as in the usual straight elastic fabric. ln the edge portions B and B', however, the warp threads 10 and l2 are so dra-wn in the harnesses that they are raised er lowered only once in every two picks, re-

maining at rest during the intervening picks.

The special threads W and W are wound on separate spools so that a greater length thereof may be consumed in the Weaving of the fabric. These threads lV and W are separately raised or lowered in such manner that the filling F will loop around the threadsl/V andWwhenever the shuttle asses out of the corresponding edges o the fabric. As the shuttle returns, the threads W and 75 are drawn in by the filling F through the edge portions B and B in which there has been no crossing of thewarpthreads between the two flights of the shuttle.

When, however, the filling F has been drawn in far enough to encounter the warp threads 10 or 12 in the middle portion A, which warp threads have been crossed between the flights of the shuttle, the filling F then loops around these middle warp threads 10 or 12. lThe drawing-in of the special threads lV or W is thereby limited to the width of the edge portions B and B.

A fabric is thus produced in which the nlling F provides the weft for the middle portion A but the threads W and W in edect constitute the weft in the edge portions B and B. By suitably increasing or decreas-` ing the size of the threads W and W', relative to the size of the filling F, the threads may be crowded at one edge of the fabric or more loosely disposed at the opposite edge of the fabric, thus producing a marked and definite curvature of the woven fabric as indicated in Fig. 5.

ln- Fig. 2,1 have indicated the use of s yarn for the thread 1W in the section B, 40ls for 'the filling F in the section A, and 60's for the thread `W in the section B. The thread W will consequently. be more closely crowded into the fabric than the filling F, while the thread TW is less crowded than the filling F. The Woven fabric will thus receive a pronounced curvature, with the thread `W at the outer or longer edge of the fabric.

lf the section B is omitted, a narrower fabric will be produced, but of definite curvilinear form.

lf a less abruptl curvature is desired, the

lll

arrangement indicated in Fig. 4 may be used, in which BOs yarn is used for the thread W and lling F, and s for the thread W. In this case, the thread W will be more loosely inserted and will again be disposed at theshort or inner edge'of the curvilinear fabric, but the curvature will be less pronounced than in the construction shown in Fig. 2.

Another method of modifying the degree of curvature is indicated in Fig. 3, in which the sizes of the threads W and W and of the filling thread F are the same as in Fig. 2, but the harnesses' are so drawn that the threads W and lV are woven into the fabric on every fourth pick of the shuttle only, instead of on every second' pick as indicated in Fig. 2. On the intervening picks, the filling thread eX- tends to the extreme edge of the fabric, as in the usual method of weaving. A less abrupt curvature is thus attained.

The several arrangements shown in the drawings are illustrative of certain adaptations of my invention but it will be readily apparent that many other arrangements and combinations of threads and of different relative sizes thereof may be substituted. Instead of a single thread lV or lV', two or more such threads may be used.

The fabric above described may be very readily produced in any ordinary narrow ware loom, it being merely necessary to provide a support for the separate spools containing the threads W and W and, if desired, to provide a tapered takeup roll for the woven fabric. l

The only other preparation necessary for weaving my improved fabric is in the special drawing of the warp threads in the usual harnesses of the loom.

The lines along which the portions B and A and the portions A and B are joined may form natural fold lines, so that the edge portions of the belt will fold alone' these lines instead of rolling, a marked advantage for many purposes and especially for belts.

Having thus described my invention and the advantages thereof, I do not wish to be limited to the details herein disclosed, otherwise'than as set forth in the claims, but what I claim is 1. A curvilinear elastic fabric comprising elastic and non-elastic warp threads, a nonelastic filling thread, and an additional special thread, loops of the special thread at one edge of the fabric extending into the fabric a predetermined distanceand acting as weft therein, said loops of special thread and said filling thread being interlaced at a predetermined point in the width of the fab'- ric inwardly removed from the edge thereof, said looped special. thread being of different thread diameter from the fill' thread, whereby a predetermined curvaz'iurc of the fabric is attained.

curviiinear elastic .ci

elastic and non-elastic warp threads, a nonelastic filling thread, and additional special threads, loopsof the special threads at each edge of the fabric extending into the fabric a predetermined distance and acting as weft therein, said loops of special threads and said filling thread being interlaced at predeten mined points in the width of the fabric inwardly removed from the edges thereof, and said looped special thread at one edge of the fabric being of a different diameter from said filling thread, whereby a predetermined curvature of a fabric is attained.

3. A curvilinear elastic fabric comprising elastic and non-elastic warp threads, a nonelastic filling thread, and additional special threads, loops of the outermost special threads at each edge of the fabric extending into the fabric a predetermined distance and acting as weft therein, said looped threads and said f1lling thread being interlaced at predetermined points in the width of the fabric inwardly removed from the edges thereof, said looped threads in one edge portion of the fabric being of greater diameter and said looped threads in the opposite edge portion being of less diameter than the filling thread, whereby a predetermined curvature of the fabric is attained.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto affixed my signature.

JOHN V. MOORE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4004617 *Nov 26, 1974Jan 25, 1977J. P. Stevens & Co., Inc.Method for forming a double catch thread narrow weave
US4073320 *Nov 1, 1976Feb 14, 1978J.P. Stevens & Co., Inc.Double catch thread narrow weave fabric
US6659138 *Jan 11, 2001Dec 9, 2003Pd-Lapp Systems GmbhDevice for producing a tape having a curve, especially a curved flat line compound
US7901415 *Feb 8, 2002Mar 8, 2011Deutsche Institute für Textil-und FaserforschungTension-free elastic tape
US8152857Jan 28, 2011Apr 10, 2012Deutsche Institute Fur Textil-Und FaserforschungTension-free elastic tape
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/421, 139/386
International ClassificationD03D15/08
Cooperative ClassificationD03D15/08, D03D2700/0103
European ClassificationD03D15/08